2. "Do I look like a handout? I am independent woman and I expect men to pay for dates and I also want someone who can take care of me, if I choose to be a full-time housewife." This is one of the most common lines that I have heard. I am always confused what does this actually mean. Do you want to be a full time housewife or not? How can you claim to be independent while expecting men to pay? No, I am not kidding.
It also may make sense to refinance your mortgage, if you can lower the interest rate on your home loan enough for it to be worth the upfront cost and the time suck it can take. Usually it’s only worth exploring if you plan to stay in your house long enough to pay off the fees from the new loan and you can get a rate at least 1% to 2% lower. (Refinancing is something to look into right now, by the way, before interest rates go up again.)
Stocks. They represent a part ownership in a company or corporation, also known as business equity. Basically, when a company performs well, the stock tends to increase in value. Stocks tend to be more volatile investments, meaning they can give you a high return on your investment long-term but tend to have larger swings in value in the short-term.
I shared this experience with other female colleagues in the office, who agreed that it was totally inappropriate and assured me I’d have their full support if I wanted to report this incident to my manager. My manager (who is a male) was also extremely supportive, reaffirming that this is not the kind of behavior we’d want to espouse with future managers and leaders of the firm. He escalated the situation to HR, who has noted this on this employee’s record. While I’m not sure if any further steps will be taken, I’m glad there was an open communication channel between me and my manager where my opinion was respected and handled with sensitivity. 
“She was impressed with Notre Dame’s faculty and students, and also our classroom and residential facilities,” Scott said of Dunlap, who retired as CEO earlier this year. “Her time on campus allowed her to visualize how this program could be implemented here at ND and how we could be the host for their second site — increasing the number of students GWI serves through their summer intensive program to 100. Kathleen was thrilled that Carl Ackermann would serve as the lead faculty instructor — especially given that he regularly wins awards for excellence in teaching the sophomore-level introductory finance course. She was also excited to learn that we were planning to have many of our female faculty teach during the program, as these women are exceptional role models for the scholars.”  
After setting up this organization and being a profitable business which makes us sustainable we realized that we were still not changing some habits in these families. Yes, they had a steady income but if the kid said, "I want to drop out of school when I'm 12," the mother said okay, fine, you don't want to go to school? Don't go to school. Or they were having Coca-Cola for breakfast, not that I have anything against Coca-Cola, but if they're suffering from diabetes maybe it's better that they have oranges, that they have orange trees in the backyard.
3. Make communication a priority. Some women shut down when it comes to talking about investing because they find the jargon too confusing to understand. But Bast believes that’s your cue to talk more about the life and family issues that drive your investment decisions, not less. “Knowledge really is power, especially when it comes to investing. If your financial advisor isn’t speaking clearly and answering your questions in the way you need, let him or her know. The more you know about your money, the more confident you may feel about your future."

I was partially being sarcastic. However, I think the comment probably holds some merit, as unfair as it may be. In addition, I don't think that it relates only to finance, but in business in general. I think from a hiring standpoint, for whatever reason, appearance absolutely can play a role in the decision-making process. I also think that, again for whatever reason, it probably plays a bigger role when the hiring decision pertains to a female.

Because women are more inclined to do research and more likely to exhibit patience than men, they’re well equipped to take the same disciplined approach to selling as they do to buying and are less prone to unloading their stocks during a market panic. Ketterer suggests establishing triggers that prompt the reevaluation of each holding. A trigger could be a set date (say, at the end of a quarter or the end of a year), or it could be a specific rise or fall in the share price. Ketterer sets a target price for each stock she buys and reevaluates it when the price approaches that level. A falling stock price is not a reason to sell, she says. But it may indicate that your initial analysis was flawed and requires review. “The greater the frequency of review of a company, its industry and the economic environment, the better,” she adds.
With more and more women are taking responsibility for their earnings and investments, the incorrect perception that all women are shopaholics and bad investors could well be a thing of the past. With inflation and taxes eating up a chunk of one’s salary, double income households are more the norm today. So, women have become savvier about savings, taxes, and investments when compared to a decade ago. Savings alone are never enough to meet a family’s financial goals. One needs to invest in order to get the best returns and the investments should be linked to goals.

Senior investment bankers spend a lot of time bonding with promoters, CEOs and fund managers. These investments yield results as the closer an advisor is to a client emotionally the more likely he/she is to get business from him. There is an innate feeling of brotherhood that comes into play here. Human beings are emotional creatures don't take fair decisions all the time. So people bond over drinks, sports, poker, travel, profanities etc. This is an area where women find it difficult to break in for obvious reasons. India is still sometime away from accepting women in this role. And this significantly impairs their ability to source business. Those who can get around this hurdle are sorted.
Given how un-fun paying taxes is, you can imagine that everyone would store all their extra money in retirement accounts if they could. But of course, the government doesn’t allow that. It limits the amount of money you can put in retirement accounts. For instance, in 2012, you can only contribute $17,000 to a 401(k) or 403(b) account (though that will be bumped up to $17,500 for 2013). Similarly, you can only put $5,000 into an IRA in 2012 (and $5,500 in 2013).
“The more women manage funds, the more funds get channeled into issues women care about,” says Nathalie Molina Niño, CEO of Brava Investments. “When someone brings on one female fund manager, we’re talking about potentially billions of dollars that get moved in a different direction.” She says that questions like “How many of your fund managers are women?” used to be rare in the industry, but now that more and more people are asking, large institutions are getting nervous—mostly because the answer is often “none” or “few.” 

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The men in the survey expressed a greater willingness to bet on exotic investments such as bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies to boost returns in their retirement savings accounts, such as 401(k)s and IRAs. Their cash was more likely to be funneled into investments with greater return potential, such as stocks, mutual funds and exchange traded funds (ETFs).
I cannot echo this enough. There is a female in a high level position at my firm and whenever she visits we go out for drinks where she spends the entire time trying to be one of the guys. Making stripper jokes, talking about football, etc. I mean not in a natural way either. It is constant during the entire conversation and obviously forced. Maybe some insecure little betas find it endearing. However,I find it annoying and it makes me think I can't trust anything she says since she's always putting on a grotesque facade. The world has changed so much I think it best to just be yourself. Yes there may be some misogynist leftovers from the Madmen days, but their numbers are dwindling and with that their power over your career.
Not only are these items expensive, but political currents in many industrialized nations are reducing the contribution government makes toward these items. Decisions in corporate America are going the same way, as employers and insurance providers offer more expensive and less comprehensive coverage. All of these trends can result in higher expenses for the elderly, as they are forced to pay increased copayments, higher premiums and increased out-of-pocket expenses.

MS. TURLINGTON BURNS: Well, I guess, I mean, mainly we started after the film came out. We were a resource. You know, who's doing what where was the way we sort of saw ourselves. And through that, I got to meet a lot of different organizations working in maternal health. Also, as a student of Public Health, you know, the world is fairly small in the maternal child health space. So, I started to get to meet a lot of incredible people who have been working their entire careers, Melanne being one of those people. And so, you know, having access to women who were leaders in these areas was incredibly inspiring. And then in terms of finding partners, I mean we started as a campaign, and then I learned that that wasn't completely fulfilling. I felt like I wanted to do more and I wanted to really connect people who were being moved by learning this information and wanting to do something that it was really hard for them to do that. So, I felt like ultimately starting an organization that I could have more control. Being able to put those pieces together and connect those dots was a lot more gratifying, not only for the community we were trying to bring along but also for the NGOs on the ground. And what I've found over time is that smaller, grassroots, community-led groups are the most exciting to work with because they truly do partner with you. And we have, as an organization, funded some larger initiatives, and you know, it's hard to get the phone picked up, and it's hard to—you know, there's a lot of turnover in the people who run the program, and you just want to, you want to have that human touch, and so, it's something that I really strive for with Every Mother Counts to continue to have that human touch. It's the most human of all issues that I can think of, and for people who have an experience or suffer a loss, or lose a loved one, or the healthcare providers that are trying to, you know, provide services every day, I think it's really important that all of those people feel, you know, respected, and have a voice, and that we can be there for them.
This kind of stuff is always interesting though. I can understand a male dominated workplace being very hostile to someone, but commenting on an attractive woman (or even a little rib to one's country...) shouldn't be near enough to constitute a case. From the details in the article? Hopefully Jefferies gets this garbage dismissed- seems like someone who was bored / shitty / entitled and wanted to get some quick cash because they couldn't handle a workplace with any more intensity than what's found on the set of Reading Rainbow.
Money Motivation: “I’m really interested in technology, and my interest in finance started with cryptoinvesting. Four years back I read the Bitcoin Whitepaper and I thought it sounded like an amazing technology. This was before everyone started talking about cryptocurrencies. People thought I was crazy buying bitcoin, but it ended up being a great investment because last December it jumped up to $20,000 and I had bought it around $1,000. I sold my bitcoin then and made $7,000. I still have .22 of a bitcoin just in case it goes up again. I started by learning the fundamentals. Right now there are so many different cryptocurrencies people are trying to buy in these initial coin offerings, but if you don’t dive into the fundamentals and understand how the technology works, you could get scammed and lose money. You shouldn’t put money into something that you don’t understand.”
MS. HAILE: We finance startups, again small and medium enterprises, also expand businesses. So, most of them are involved in agriculture, manufacturing, export/import, transport, communications, etcetera. Coming to the size of the loans, we have two loans, which we do like any other conventional commercial bank. We give loans because the bank is for both women and men because we don't exclude me, even though the bank is for women. Quite a good number of women are banking honestly with us because they love our objectives and what we're doing. So, in this respect the government of Ethiopia has set its own policy on collateral requirements, which is 100% plus. But for us, we have eased the collateral for women for this conventional part of the loan from 51 to 70. So, in this process out of, you know, we're a young bank, it's only three years, so out of the 942 borrowers 309, 33% are women, which we are very glad because we have waived that from 100% plus to 51 to 70. So, the loan size on average is 1.8 million U.S. dollars. Again, we have another loan, which we call the risk fund, the grantee fund, which voluntarily we have set aside a certain amount of money for those small and medium enterprises, mainly growth-oriented businesses, who need money but they don't have the collateral. So, this is the side of the loan which we provide, and so far we were able to give 610 businesses, women's businesses in this part of the loan. We have thousands of women on the line on that because of the problem of collateral. But lucky we were, a few months back we were able to sign grant fund from U.S. - - ten million U.S. dollars from the grantee fund. You know, when you improve working everybody comes to support you. So, now we are now ready to expand our loan on the risk fund side again, also working more on the conventional part.
One senior woman at a European bank argued that the push to promote more women is itself problematic. "The senior men have now got a cover for promoting the younger women who flirt with them," she said. "They know they have to promote X number of women each year, so they look around and they promote the women who kiss up to them most instead of the women who are the most competent. It's the same as the old boys' network, with flirtation instead of familiarity."
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While the past decades have seen a great advancement in the field of gender equality in the workplace, the title of James Brown’s classic song “It’s a Man’s Man’s Man’s World” still rings true when it comes to investment banking. Still, women have a lot to offer to the job and it seems that despite lagging behind other industries, Wall Street has finally started to realize it too.  

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Your goal, therefore, is to try to keep your emotions in check. Although there’s little direct data to suggest that women are less susceptible to market euphoria, they do seem a bit calmer during panics. The Vanguard Group looked at whether customers of its retirement plans were moving money out of stocks during 2008, when the U.S. market plunged 37%. Overall, the fund giant found, investors were fairly steadfast, but women were more so, proving to be 10% less likely to sell their stock holdings than men.
In some cases, educated, independent, breadwinning women seem to have an aversion to the idea of being an investor. About five years ago the Washington, D.C.-based Women's Institute for a Secure Retirement was running a series of investment seminars to help a group of nurses prepare for retirement. The institute was interested in part for research purposes, because nurses would be highly educated and, presumably, interested in investing.
Without investment, Facebook and Amazon might have been just interesting projects hatched in a dorm room or garage. Starbucks might still be just a few coffee shops in Seattle without investors who enabled the company to expand to over 20,000 stores worldwide today. The world's most innovative companies rely on investors to fund growth and expansion.

Women entrepreneurs continue to face significant disadvantages in business despite studies showing that their companies actually outperform all-male companies by 63%. Incredibly, female business owners receive only 3% of venture capital investments, significantly limiting the growth of their companies. Female founders of color receive a mere fraction of that amount. We at FUND Conference are determined to help change this.

In a recent survey by Morgan Stanley 84% of women said they were interested in “sustainable” investing, that is, targeting not just financial returns but social or environmental goals. The figure for men was 67%. Matthew Patsky of Trillium Asset Management, a sustainable-investment firm, estimates that two-thirds of the firm’s direct clients who are investing as individuals are women. Among the couples who are joint clients, investing sustainably has typically been the wife’s idea. Julia Balandina Jaquier, an impact-investment adviser in Zurich, says that though women who inherit wealth are often less confident than men about how to invest it, when it comes to investing with a social impact “women are more often prepared to be the risk-takers and trailblazers.”


Second, women are more successful investors. Terrance Odean and Brad Barber, who conducted the seminal piece of research on this phenomenon, showed women outperform men annually by about 1 percentage point. A study from Betterment, a computerized portfolio manager or “robo-advisor,” expands upon why. It looked at the accounts of around 60,000 investors, about one-quarter of them women. Female investors signed into their accounts 45% less frequently and changed their asset allocation 20% less frequently than male investors did.
Women are often more cautious than men, a quality which has become highly valued in the post-financial crisis world. Intuition is another valuable ‘female’ quality when it comes to investment decisions. And last but not least, women are often more goal-driven, knowing that they sometimes need to work twice as hard as their male colleagues to get ahead.
"As more women invest, we will demonstrate through a show of force that we believe in each other enough to invest in each other — whether we can invest $1 or millions. We will do this by choosing investments that advance women and help improve our world. We will commit 25% of our investment portfolios to “impact investments” by 2025." — Let’s Disrupt Money
Don't put your investments on long-term autopilot. One of women's strengths as investors is that they are less tempted to buy and sell in the short term, based on classic research by Brad M. Barber and Terrance Odean at the University of California-Berkeley. But at least once a year, you need to become an active investor, checking your asset allocation as you age and your needs change. That means changing your asset allocation when it's required, or hiring an investment advisor or an online investment platform to do it for you. "This was my own mistake in 2008. ... I didn't have cash, and I was fairly close to retirement," said Hounsell.
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