In your 40s you’re probably thinking about funding your kid’s higher education. If you think you haven’t saved enough for it, consider an Education Loan. This loan gives you tax benefits under Section 80E of the Income Tax Act. If not, loans against property or Fixed Deposit are a better option. These come at a lower interest rate. Never use your retirement savings to fund your child’s education because it will be difficult to rebuild those savings. Once you have used your savings to fund some of your goals, the money you were using to save for these goals should be redirected to your retirement savings. 
Investment banker and VP Tamara Stasny says it’s important to pay attention to who the clients really are to determine how they can get value for their businesses. Stasny brings with her a vast amount of experience in the energy sector, including owning an energy company herself. Stasny says she “can relate to the clients, because I put the sweat equity in. It’s very personal.”
Remember that there are many different definitions of "retirement." You don't have to attain some preconceived ideal. To reference our survey again, though the largest percentage of our respondents said they planned on a traditional retirement (i.e., leaving the workforce entirely between ages 65 and 70), a significant portion also reported making the forced or unforced choice to put off retirement or transition to a second career.6

So, if you’re eager to make a major job or career change… you guessed it, make a plan. Consider making a list of pros and cons for taking the plunge. If everything in your life is pointing to making a major change, figure out what new goal makes the most sense for you. Take an inventory of your skills and experience, along with your interests and aspirations, and figure out which careers/industries you best align with. Do you have any friends or family who have jobs that sound potentially intriguing to you? If so, ask them more about it. Do your research—the Internet is a great source of information for researching new companies and careers.
OP, I'm not saying this to be rude, but arguably the most important trait of a successful analyst is being resourceful. This question has been asked hundreds of times on WSO and always is answered the same way: if you work hard, no one cares if you're male, female, black, white, or a martian. Again, not trying to be rude, but this has been asked and answered ad-nauseum.

Krawcheck, Hounsell and Judith Ward, senior financial planner and vice president at Baltimore-based fund company T. Rowe Price, suggested a few steps for women to take if they are looking to overcome their fear of investing and build confidence. Women need the higher returns that come from investing, because they live, on average, almost five years longer than men.
MS. ALYSE NELSON: Well hello everyone, I'm Elise Nelson. I'm President and CEO of Vital Voices. Let me just first say how exciting it is to be here at the mothership of Bank of America. I heard it actually called that. Vital Voices, as you know, launched in partnership with Bank of America this really innovative partnership five years ago. So, it's quite special to be back here and to see so many people in this room who were really part of making it happen and looking at Zoe and Susan and of course Pam Seagle, and so many others who just made this a reality.
First up, a woman in one of the most male-dominated industries of them all: investment banking. Sure, we've heard the horror stories of 100+ hour workweeks, fraternity-esque hazing of entry-level employees, and of course, rampant sexual harassment. But it's probably not all The Wolf of Wall Street. To get the record straight, we're talking to an entry-level investment banking analyst. 

Betterment’s research found that in addition to taking a more hands-off approach, female investors were less likely to indulge in what Swift calls “erratic behavior,” meaning less likely to dump all of their stocks and go completely into bonds or vice versa. Although the majority of male investors in the study didn’t behave this way, men were nearly six times more likely than women to make this move.

Note that even the reported numbers (which are sobering as P. Brown has stated above) appear to generously overstate the actual number of women in investment roles. This is due to lack of transparency and confusing websites on the part of private investment firms. If one were to further breakout non-investment professionals who are often listed on the investment team pages, the result would likely show ~0% to 5% of senior "investment professionals", defined as those making investment decisions, in the field of private equity are women. *For example, Blackstone includes women on the investment team pages who are serve in administrative and portfolio operations functions (i.e., women who don't make investment decisions) such as Chief Administrative Officer. Counting the number of women in the Private Equity department on the investment team without Administrative or Portfolio Operations roles, Blackstone's Private Equity (www.blackstone.com/the-firm/our-people -> Private Equity, Tactical Opportunities, Infrastructure) teams' female representation appears closer to 0% to 3%. Professor Lietz's study includes data on the largest Private Equity funds' female representation:


Shelly Bell has lived many lives. She’s a computer scientist, a former high school teacher, a performance poet, a community organizer, a founder, and a CEO. She has two successful apparel printing businesses: MsPrint USA—through which she creates swag for clients like Amazon and Google with a team of women designers and printers—and Made By A Black Woman, which celebrates products made by Black women.

It is definitely doable. I am acquainted with one female at Barclays(some of you might know who I'm talking about) who has managed to wield a massive amount of influence over the company as an associate to where she is more or less a gatekeeper for MBA recruiting. She's very direct, very professional, and very people smart...and she didn't get to where she is by trying to by imitating someone else. She crafted and managed her own unique brand.
MS. CRONSTEDT: So, I, a year after participating in the program, sold my first business and simultaneously, I started a new one based on the knowledge and the tools that were given to me in the Global Ambassadors Program, which was a more successful company, just in short. Which was an online catering company that exists to this day, and that has--
11. Statistics Canada, “Occupation - National Occupational Classification (NOC) 2016 (693A), Highest Certificate, Diploma or Degree (15), Labour Force Status (3), Age (13A) and Sex (3) for the Labour Force Aged 15 Years and Over in Private Households of Canada, Provinces and Territories, Census Metropolitan Areas and Census Agglomerations, 2016 Census - 25% Sample Data,” 2016 Census (2017).
MS. VERVEER: And what about networks? Because I think the other thing that women tend to lack in many ways, and we see this in the economics sphere among entrepreneurs, but I think we also see it more broadly, which is the need to be able to come together to meet other people in our sphere, others who can help take an element of what we're doing and enable us to forge ahead. So, more of a concentration on networks as well, that development, which again I think is what the program represents.
Women used to get a bad rap on Wall Street. Industry observers maintained that women started too late, saved too little and invested too conservatively. But research is increasingly proving otherwise. Just as Little League pitching phenom Mo’ne Davis turned the phrase “you throw like a girl” into a compliment, author LouAnn Lofton says you should be flattered if someone says you invest like a girl. After all, says Lofton, who wrote Warren Buffett Invests Like a Girl, the nation’s best-known investor does.
Fidelity research among professional women across the country shows there's no shortage of interest in learning more about financial management and investment choices, with over 90 percent saying they want to learn more about financial planning8. For many, this stems from a need to play ‘catch up,' with a majority reporting a lack of opportunity to learn financial skills earlier in life.

If you’re looking to acquire new job skills in the new year, consider the following. Do you want to acquire skills that will make you more effective at your current job or a new one? Your answer to this question will help you determine which skills you should look at. Also, are you looking to invest money towards acquiring new skills? If so, there are a wealth of career and adult education/skill-development programs available across the country; a great place to start is researching the offerings at colleges and universities in your area. You’ll likely come across a wealth of options, both in class and online—you just need to decide which are right for you.
Top GWI Takeaway: “An important thing to realize is that there are certain types of financial firms and investment strategies focused on doing some sort of social good. We’ve been learning about ESG investing, which is Environmental, Social and Governance Investing [which refers to three central factors in measuring the sustainability and ethical impact of in investment in a business]. That is something directly designed to make things better, but through the use of financial tools. We also found out about foundations and investing for not-for-profits. All of that combined has shown me that there is still a way to be in finance and pursue some form of public service. I was very interested in law and politics from the social-good perspective, and I’m seeing those worlds align with finance.”
A fiduciary is a company or organization that is legally bound to do the right thing by their clients. Not all brokers or investment firms classify as a fiduciary, so make sure to ask before officially signing with anyone. If you find a great firm that isn’t a fiduciary, just make sure that they put client security and well-being above personal gain.
Nearly seven out of 10 (67 percent) female Millennials, for example, said their parents encouraged them to "save" money, versus just 58 percent of males. Similarly, only 29 percent of females surveyed said their parents "showed (them) ways to grow wealth." By contrast, 37 percent of males said their financial education was focused on wealth-building, the survey found.
It is a very demanding profession as one needs to devote all her time and attention to work alone leaving less time for family. So when people have kids and don't have someone back at home to rear them, it becomes a source of constant guilt and grief for everyone in the system. It becomes extremely competitive and political at the senior management levels as only a few people can be accommodated at that level. If one is not able to give her 100% to work for whatever reasons, it becomes difficult to compete. It finally boils to the candidate's personal rapport with the top management and conscious gender sensitivity on the part of the organisation to get over this hurdle. Most firms are found wanting on this factor though in recent times at least the established ones with a large work force are trying to be conscious about it.
MS. TURLINGTON BURNS: You're further ahead than I was. I ran my first marathon in 2011 and we were given ten spots for a very new charitable organization as part of the New York City Marathon. And I thought, "Well, I know some runners, and I can't not run it as the head of this organization." So, I signed up, and immediately when I started training I saw the connection between what we're trying to do, where there is need, and where there is really an intense barrier, which is distance, and how we can connect the dots there. So, I ran the first one and then I thought, "Oh yeah, I have two kids. I think I could do that two times." And then it just started to grow, and it's turned out that there are a lot of runners out there, or people who are just—I think people who are taking care of themselves and are active, healthy people, are more likely to care about the health and wellbeing of others, than your average person. So, we found that it's been a very connective, very community-building type of event, and people go couch to marathon, or they walk, cycle, you know, anything that you do already there's a way that you can contribute that effort towards other people.
“I listen to 20 hours of customer calls every month,” says Murphy. “Young people call and they’re trying to figure out what to do with their the money.” The answer – she says – is basic asset allocation often accomplished by putting with the help of a target date fund. “When things get more complicated they probably will want a financial advisor. But [at the start] let’s demystify it and if there is a simple investment solution focus on that. Betterment Data Scientist Sam Swift agrees. “We encourage people to be as passive as possible,” he says.
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MS. TURLINGTON BURNS: Well, they go hand-in-hand. I mean, no matter where I've traveled in the world, you know, that when a woman not only has opportunity, is able to go to school for longer, there is a correlation between, you know, her sexual debut, first child, marriage, all of those things, which impact her freedom. I find that, and you see it, and I think it was in the first film that came up that when a woman has economic independence, she's more likely to put those funds towards her family. She'll be more likely to take care, and seek care earlier than she would otherwise, and so, you just see the thoughtfulness that goes into that. And without it it's a lot harder, you know, If you don't have decision-making power, if you don't have, you know, you're literally waiting for someone else to make a decision whether your life is worth saving. So, no one should be in that position, and I think to have more opportunities and more equality—obviously a woman is going to be better off, and you're going to see the impact in her family and in her community more than you would otherwise.
In recent weeks, Knowledge@Wharton High School began noticing young women on the Wharton campus in Philadelphia, Pa., U.S., who were wearing hats and carrying bags inscribed with three simple words: Girls Who Invest. Since we happen to know lots of girls with this interest – thousands from around the world have participated in our annual KWHS Investment Competition for high school students – we decided to look further into this intriguing GWI sorority. Who were they? Why were they here? And were they truly stock market devotees?
WIN is a forum for full-time MBA women from top business schools around the country and investment professionals from sponsoring firms to gather, network, hear perspectives on investment careers and related topics from industry representatives, learn from distinguished women and men in the industry; and showcase their stock-picking skills in front of judges from sponsoring firms and obtain feedback on their pitches.  More than 60 women MBA students from top business schools and 65 representatives from top-tier investment management firms are expected to attend.
MS. TURLINGTON BURNS: You're further ahead than I was. I ran my first marathon in 2011 and we were given ten spots for a very new charitable organization as part of the New York City Marathon. And I thought, "Well, I know some runners, and I can't not run it as the head of this organization." So, I signed up, and immediately when I started training I saw the connection between what we're trying to do, where there is need, and where there is really an intense barrier, which is distance, and how we can connect the dots there. So, I ran the first one and then I thought, "Oh yeah, I have two kids. I think I could do that two times." And then it just started to grow, and it's turned out that there are a lot of runners out there, or people who are just—I think people who are taking care of themselves and are active, healthy people, are more likely to care about the health and wellbeing of others, than your average person. So, we found that it's been a very connective, very community-building type of event, and people go couch to marathon, or they walk, cycle, you know, anything that you do already there's a way that you can contribute that effort towards other people.
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“My biggest advice to women who want to save more money is to make more money,” said financial expert Nicole Lapin, the winner of GOBankingRates.com’s 2015 Best Money Expert competition. “When you stop looking at your financial life as something of deprivation and more of something as aspiration, that’s when you actually feel comfortable of taking control of your own finances.”
Who among us doesn’t want a loftier position with a more impressive sounding title and a higher salary, regardless of where we currently work? The truth is, this isn’t always an immediately attainable reality for everyone—maybe you’re just getting started at your current job and it’s too soon to start thinking about a promotion, or maybe the place you work at is small and there’s no clear upward trajectory. Whatever the reason, if you’re seeking a promotion and there’s no obvious path for growth for you in your current job, perhaps this means you should make a more drastic change as part of your New Year’s resolution planning.
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