A fiduciary is a company or organization that is legally bound to do the right thing by their clients. Not all brokers or investment firms classify as a fiduciary, so make sure to ask before officially signing with anyone. If you find a great firm that isn’t a fiduciary, just make sure that they put client security and well-being above personal gain.
Investment banker and VP Tamara Stasny says it’s important to pay attention to who the clients really are to determine how they can get value for their businesses. Stasny brings with her a vast amount of experience in the energy sector, including owning an energy company herself. Stasny says she “can relate to the clients, because I put the sweat equity in. It’s very personal.”
A raft of surveys indicate that women do more research, are better at matching their investments to their goals, trade less and remain calmer during market upheavals. If you’re unsettled by this year’s stock market swoon, you may be interested to know that, on average, the portfolios of female investors hold up better than those of their male counterparts during a downturn. An analysis of the 60,000 users of Openfolio, an online investment-sharing platform, found that in 2014, a stellar year for the markets, the women investors it tracks outpaced their male peers by an average of 0.4 percentage point. In 2015, a poor year for markets, women lost an average of 2.5%, compared with a loss of 3.8% for men. In both years, women on average achieved their results with smaller swings than men had, adding luster to their already impressive achievements.
The result is an investment gap. Fewer women take part in the financial market, and that hurts women’s total wealth over time, thereby exacerbating the gender wealth gap. It’s a vicious, sexist financial cycle. “If women earn less and don’t invest those earnings, the gap gets bigger and bigger,” Morrison says. But as Morrison proves, it doesn’t have to be this way.
11. Statistics Canada, “Occupation - National Occupational Classification (NOC) 2016 (693A), Highest Certificate, Diploma or Degree (15), Labour Force Status (3), Age (13A) and Sex (3) for the Labour Force Aged 15 Years and Over in Private Households of Canada, Provinces and Territories, Census Metropolitan Areas and Census Agglomerations, 2016 Census - 25% Sample Data,” 2016 Census (2017).
And the hot thing. First girls need to judge their "hot level" before they want try to leverage it. I've meet plenty of girls that think they're gorgeous because their friends tell them so. Girls will say other girls are attractive (in a straight way) by their personality, how "cute" they dress, how much weight they've lost, etc. Guys equate "hot'ness" to legs, tits, ass, & attractiveness of facial features (generally speaking). In all sincerity, if you haven't been known for those (the latter) things most of your life or haven't had a ton of the more desirable men in your social circles blowing you up all the time, then you probably won't have that type of power over the guys in your office. If those things do apply, just don't be a stone cold bitch, like the coupon cunt from from above, be nice, and you've got pretty good get out of jail card. IMO.
It’s real, and at the very least people are beginning to understand that the average woman makes between 78¢ and 80¢ for every $1 a man makes in the same job. To a woman earning $85,000 a year, that translates into lifetime costs of hundreds of thousands of dollars. The gap is not as bad for millennial women (at closer to 90¢), but it’s worse for women with disabilities (72¢), black women (63¢), and Latinas (54¢).
Investing is not some get-rich-quick scheme and there is always a degree of risk. But those women who are comfortable with that risk should not be deterred by the aggressive macho investor stereotype. The proof of the increasing success of women in the world of investing can be seen in the female-focused investment firms that have sprung up. As Alexander Taussig, the senior vice president for women investors at Fidelity, has said, "The myth that men are better investors is just that -- a myth."
MS. TURLINGTON BURNS: Sixty percent of women here give birth at home without a skilled provider by their side. And one in 83 women die in childbirth. That's a staggering number. Every time I hear these statistics I realize how lucky I was when I gave birth to my daughter. After giving birth I started to hemorrhage. Without the skilled care of my midwife and nurses I could have died. I had no idea that women still die in childbirth. Once I knew, I had to do something about it. Just imagine, you're about to give birth and you have no ride to the hospital. So, you have to walk five, 10, even 20 miles to reach care. Then when you finally arrive you find there's no electricity, no doctor, no midwife, no nurse. More than 300 thousand women die in childbirth every year. That's one woman every two minutes, and almost all of them, 98%, are preventable. For these mothers, we can be a light in the darkness.

MS. NELSON: So, Oulimata, I know that you are a Global Ambassador in this program, but you've also participated as a mentor for another program supported by Bank of America, the Cherie Blair Foundation's work with mentoring, particularly online mentoring. Can you talk a little bit about your experiences with both of those programs, first with the Cherie Blair Foundation?

From what I've seen as a dude, the women who are most successful are the ones who are competent, confident, and drama-free. The biggest mistake I've seen is women trying to imitate men. It's a mistake, because what a lot of people think "men" act like is usually not how the most successful men act. You've almost certainly got a massively better ability to read people than your male peers, better soft persuasion skills, and you look better. Be pleasant, be professional, and most of the younger guys wont' care. Can't speak for the older ones.

Ment Make Management

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