MS. CRONSTEDT: So, I think that sometimes you're too afraid or scared to ask somebody for help, to be your mentor, but we've learned today and in the program during this week is that you can simply ask. And it can be just a question, and you can have a mini mentor just for that simple thing that you're asking about. It could be something you need for your business, a connection that you might need. So, maybe there is an opportunity for mini mentoring around us all the time, and I would really promote that, do that, ask the questions, say what you need, and it is around us, and I think I've had many more mentors that I actually think that I've had. They're around us. Yeah. 

Don’t attempt to boil the ocean. “The industry has been set up to make investing feel scary,” Katchen says. “The old boys club wants you to believe that you need them to tell you what to do with your money, but the basics are simple: Don’t spend more than you make, save regularly, and get into the markets, that’s the essence of what it’s all about.”
Barbara Swenson has several years work experience in the areas of accounting, real estate investing, marketing, financial management, insurance, and independent book publishing. She’s written numerous articles for AllBusiness.com, and is a Contributing Writer for Retailing Insight. She was also a Contributing Editor for the international magazine Magical Blend, and has penned articles for Aquarius and NAPRA Review magazines. She has written and published 25 personal transformation books in the last twenty years. Barbara holds a Bachelor of Arts from California State University Sonoma (with honors), and a Masters Degree in Science from California State University Sacramento (with honors). She lives in the Sierra foothills with her husband and son, two huge white dogs, and four cats.
Senior investment bankers spend a lot of time bonding with promoters, CEOs and fund managers. These investments yield results as the closer an advisor is to a client emotionally the more likely he/she is to get business from him. There is an innate feeling of brotherhood that comes into play here. Human beings are emotional creatures don't take fair decisions all the time. So people bond over drinks, sports, poker, travel, profanities etc. This is an area where women find it difficult to break in for obvious reasons. India is still sometime away from accepting women in this role. And this significantly impairs their ability to source business. Those who can get around this hurdle are sorted.
MS. TURLINGTON BURNS: Well, I guess, I mean, mainly we started after the film came out. We were a resource. You know, who's doing what where was the way we sort of saw ourselves. And through that, I got to meet a lot of different organizations working in maternal health. Also, as a student of Public Health, you know, the world is fairly small in the maternal child health space. So, I started to get to meet a lot of incredible people who have been working their entire careers, Melanne being one of those people. And so, you know, having access to women who were leaders in these areas was incredibly inspiring. And then in terms of finding partners, I mean we started as a campaign, and then I learned that that wasn't completely fulfilling. I felt like I wanted to do more and I wanted to really connect people who were being moved by learning this information and wanting to do something that it was really hard for them to do that. So, I felt like ultimately starting an organization that I could have more control. Being able to put those pieces together and connect those dots was a lot more gratifying, not only for the community we were trying to bring along but also for the NGOs on the ground. And what I've found over time is that smaller, grassroots, community-led groups are the most exciting to work with because they truly do partner with you. And we have, as an organization, funded some larger initiatives, and you know, it's hard to get the phone picked up, and it's hard to—you know, there's a lot of turnover in the people who run the program, and you just want to, you want to have that human touch, and so, it's something that I really strive for with Every Mother Counts to continue to have that human touch. It's the most human of all issues that I can think of, and for people who have an experience or suffer a loss, or lose a loved one, or the healthcare providers that are trying to, you know, provide services every day, I think it's really important that all of those people feel, you know, respected, and have a voice, and that we can be there for them.

Phil Town is an investment advisor, hedge fund manager, 3x NY Times best-selling author, ex-Grand Canyon river guide and a former Lieutenant in the US Army Special Forces. He and his wife, Melissa, share a passion for horses, polo, and eventing. Phil’s goal is to help you learn how to invest and achieve financial independence. You can follow him on google+, facebook, and twitter.

Making investing a habit—a bit out of every paycheck—is also smart and may be a means of further reducing risk. That’s because sometimes you may be “buying high,” and sometimes you may be “buying low.” But over time, these may even out…and reduce the time it can take for your portfolio to recover from any market downturn (since during the stock plunge, you’ll be “buying low”).
The WII Summit seeks to bring together HBS alumni, industry professionals, and current MBAs for a day of open discussion about the current topics affecting the buy-side community. It is an unparalleled opportunity to meet and network with industry peers and senior women in an open forum and exchange perspectives on how to drive a successful career in investing.
The best place to start investing is in a 401(k) retirement account, if your employer offers one. The tax advantage will help your money grow faster, and if your employer provides a match, all the better! (That’s free money.) If you have the ability to contribute up to the match, do that first—since your contributions are pretax, they can help lower your tax bill. Next, look to an individual retirement account outside work. IRAs have a further tax benefit, but not all of them have the same effect on your tax bill. IRAs are great if you want to put more toward your retirement. If you don’t, then invest in outside brokerage accounts.
I write contracts that are a little bit more involved in terms of tax and accounting stuff but also it’s a contract that helps the company raise money with certain objectives. So if you borrow money from the bank for a mortgage your credit rating goes down, same with the company’s. I do something with bonds that make them have ‘equity like; features, it’s called a hybrid. Basically what I do is create very funky bonds. [Laughs] That’s what I say in my Instagram profile because no one understands. It’s bonds, but it’s very funky.
But Stash’s analysis does find that male and female Stash users behave quite differently when markets become volatile. Stash examined its users’ behavior on two especially volatile days for markets in 2018—Feb. 5 and Feb. 8, when major stock indexes suffered big losses, moving into what Stash defines as correction territory. On those days, the men panicked: Men who use Stash were 87% more likely than women, on average, to sell an investment. That behavior continued through the following week, with the men remaining 76% more likely than the women to sell an investment.

Investing in companies that make products or deliver services that you use can be a great way to discover winning investments when the firms are still young and have the potential to grow rapidly, says Nicole Sherrod, managing director and head of trading at TD Ameritrade. She invested early in Amazon.com (AMZN), Apple (AAPL) and Disney (DIS) because they provided products or services that she, as a working mother, couldn’t live without. All of the stocks have had great runs in recent years at one time or another. “When you see a product that’s really unique or is flying off the shelf, find out who makes it,” Sherrod suggests. “You’re choosing products every day, so you have tremendous exposure to great companies.”
Money Motivation: “Coming from a liberal arts background, I wanted real-world knowledge about finance. My parents aren’t in finance and I don’t have much of a background in finance. With econ as my major and learning theoretical things, it was worrisome to me. Am I going to be way behind everyone else? But [the guest speakers we have met during the program] told us that you learn everything on the job.”

If you’re looking for a way to automate your own investment strategy or want to start investing on a small-scale without using a broker or firm, an investment app might be the right platform for you. If you type in “investment apps” in the app store search tool, hundreds of options will pull up, but not all will help you grow your savings to hit a solid return.

MS. ALYSE NELSON: Well hello everyone, I'm Elise Nelson. I'm President and CEO of Vital Voices. Let me just first say how exciting it is to be here at the mothership of Bank of America. I heard it actually called that. Vital Voices, as you know, launched in partnership with Bank of America this really innovative partnership five years ago. So, it's quite special to be back here and to see so many people in this room who were really part of making it happen and looking at Zoe and Susan and of course Pam Seagle, and so many others who just made this a reality.
Whether or not the results are predetermined by biology, the investment approach favored by the fairer gender is a time-tested, traditional approach to investing often referred to as "buy and hold." The strategy is simple: Investors identify a promising investment, purchase it and hold it for a long period of time, regardless of short-term market conditions.
11. Statistics Canada, “Occupation - National Occupational Classification (NOC) 2016 (693A), Highest Certificate, Diploma or Degree (15), Labour Force Status (3), Age (13A) and Sex (3) for the Labour Force Aged 15 Years and Over in Private Households of Canada, Provinces and Territories, Census Metropolitan Areas and Census Agglomerations, 2016 Census - 25% Sample Data,” 2016 Census (2017).
I'd have to agree with the above post. Don't act like a man. You're not , and it just looks weird. But that being said if you're super nice then you'd probably get taken advantage of, so for example, in an interview setting just be yourself. If you are super nice then you probably don't fit in the typical banking environment. After all, you don't want to land a job on the notion of you being someone completely different than you are. You will eventually get tired and want to quit becuase you can't stand to act like someone you're not.
Another reason why women may not be as aggressive as men when it comes to investing is because they are more conservative — they like to hang on to their cash, explains Cary Carbonaro, CFP and Managing Director of United Capital of NY and Author of the "Money Queen's Guide for Women Who Want to Build Wealth and Banish Fear". “When I tell my clients they should have an emergency fund, the men will tell me, ‘But I want my emergency fund in the market,’ and meanwhile the women will have five times the emergency fund they need, sitting in the bank, not doing anything. For some reason, women are afraid of losing money, while men seem to be afraid of losing out by not playing the market.”
I come from a completely non-traditional background when I was applying but ended up getting in the industry anyways. After you get in, at the junior level, hard work, have a good attitude/personality, motivation, adaptable and being smart at work (like let other ppl know you did the work..) will get you ahead, not if you are a girl or boy or loud mouth or not.
MS. TURLINGTON BURNS: So many audiences that I speak to are thinking about the same, if they're moms they're like, "How do I get my kids to understand how the world works and to understand some of these issues that we're grappling with?" And I think like I said earlier just to be exposed to the world in as many communities and different types of people and cultures the better, as early as possible. So, we were doing some trips to visit grantee partners in the field and it makes a huge impact for anyone who has not traveled, but anyone to go and have that firsthand experience to meet people and to learn, you know, really at the frontlines what's going on, but to have your child with you is also extraordinary. So, last year we led our first mother-child trip, and I'll say mother-child because it was supposed to be mother-daughter but there was one brave 12-year-old boy who came with his mother. And this year we have another group going down to Guatemala again, mostly 16 and 17-year-old girls, but there will be another brave 14-year-old young man whose mother is an obstetrician who has come with us on a few different trips. So, he's probably going to be a little bit more informed than the average 14-year-old.
MS. SPELLINGS: Absolutely. Well, to set the table, and probably a lot of people in this room know this, but you know, this city, and Raleigh not, is the worst in the United States of America for economic mobility. Raleigh is a tiny bit better, but not much. And so, the gaps are wide here in North Carolina. Here's the good news about that, is because likewise Wake County and Mecklenburg County are some of the highest educated counties in the nation with, you know, 50% higher education attainment with a statewide average in the low 40s. And so, the gaps are very, very wide, and I think, you know, people used to ask me this all the time, if I could wave a magic wand I would start with higher expectations of our children, all of our children, rural children, black children, brown children, poor children. You know? If half the school lunches served today in school cafeterias were tainted and people got sick we would be outraged, it would lead the news today here in this community or nationally. Half of the kids, poor kids getting out of high school nobody seems to, that doesn't matter that much because that's our expectation that it's okay that those children are left behind, to use an old-fashioned parlance that you might have heard before.
Those are the questions we sought to answer through a survey conducted by CNBC and LinkedIn. This look at challenges facing women on Wall Street is the first in a series of surveys aimed at highlighting some of the big issues facing women in the workplace. We polled over 1,000 men and women who work across the financial services industry in banking, capital markets, financial services, investment banking and investment management in the U.S. The survey was conducted between April 18 and 27. Participants were invited on a random basis and self-reported gender.
And I'm thrilled to be joined by some of our past mentees and current mentors for a discussion really about the power of partnership. You know, I think that there's something really profound going on in our world today, and I think that if you look around the world, and it was echoed in all these discussions that we just had, that women are really reaching the highest levels of leadership. And I think they're getting there and they're realizing that, you know, they came a lot further than they anticipated. They have a lot more power, they have a lot more reach than they ever thought would be possible for them in their lives. And the first thing they think is, "How am I going to give back? How am I going to pay this opportunity forward? Engage more people?" And they don't just want to write a check, they really want to give of their time and their resources. They want to open up their networks.

MS. JILL CALABRESE BAIN: Sure, well first I want to say I'm humbled to share the stage with these two women, and all of their tremendous accomplishments. So, ladies, thank you. You know, the state of the state is actually good. There is about ten million small businesses owned by women in the United States. It's actually the fastest growing segment of the small business population, and it represents about a third of all small business owners nationally. We have the privilege of banking about 1.2 of those, 1.2 million of those women today, so it's about 40% of what it is that we do at the bank. And when we looked at the survey the news is actually pretty good. I mean women are fairly confident in the economy today and where they believe the economy will go in the next 12 months. However, there's still some hesitation around revenue growth and long-term economic growth. And so, when we look at that it's about 44% of the women feel really confident, which is good but that's down from about 54% last year. So, we always look at access to capital. Access to capital is something that plagues both men and women. But they tend to look at sources of capital differently, and we see that women, at least in the survey that we just recently completed, only about 7% actually think that they will pursue financing in 2017, which is a little lower than their male counterparts. And sometimes what we see it's the confidence factor. They feel like they need all of the information before they even ask the question, which we know that that's not the case and we want to be able to support those women.
However, after talking to more professionals in the finance field and reading articles like this, I have regained my faith in finance and became a co-leader for the finance club at my high school. My biggest concern is the one depicted in this article: the club has an extreme lack of female members (we only had one last year). As you have mentioned, this is unfortunate as diversity fosters more informed decisions. Similarly, Kelly Loeffler of Intercontinental Exchange, who was quoted in the KWHS article titled “Career Insight: Advice from New York Stock Exchange President Stacey Cunningham”, believes that gender should not be a limiting factor for the expression of intellectual curiosity. You mentioned how you felt uneasy in male-dominated classes, and as a male, I never had to go through the same feelings, but I certainly want to change this limiting atmosphere in academic settings. I think your mentioning of Kylie’s Cosmetics is a perfect example of how more female members could allow the male-dominated industry to make more informed and wise investments. Yet even though we recently had a female member take upon a leadership position, many other female classmates I’ve talked told have told me that the finance industry was “disgusting” and filled with greedy, misogynistic men.
Because women are more inclined to do research and more likely to exhibit patience than men, they’re well equipped to take the same disciplined approach to selling as they do to buying and are less prone to unloading their stocks during a market panic. Ketterer suggests establishing triggers that prompt the reevaluation of each holding. A trigger could be a set date (say, at the end of a quarter or the end of a year), or it could be a specific rise or fall in the share price. Ketterer sets a target price for each stock she buys and reevaluates it when the price approaches that level. A falling stock price is not a reason to sell, she says. But it may indicate that your initial analysis was flawed and requires review. “The greater the frequency of review of a company, its industry and the economic environment, the better,” she adds.
But many still hesitate to reach out for help. Women across all generations are less likely to reach out to an adviser than men, with six out of 10 saying they have never consulted with a financial professional. Among this group, the top reason why was feeling like they didn't have enough money. Other barriers holding women back from addressing their finances: not knowing where to start and simply not making it a priority11.
Annuities are issued by Jackson National Life Insurance Company (Home Office: Lansing, Michigan) and in New York, annuities are issued by Jackson National Life Insurance Company of New York (Home Office: Purchase, New York). Variable products are distributed by Jackson National Life Distributors LLC. May not be available in all states and state variations may apply. These products have limitations and restrictions. Contact the Company for more information.
We spoke to women working across U.S. and European investment banks about their reaction to the figures. Some were resigned and described them as as a fact of life. Others agreed with Goldman - that the UK government isn't comparing like with like because a high proportion of women in finance occupy non-front office jobs like personal assistants. Others, however, were angry. And the reasons for their anger weren't always those discussed in sanitized accounts of women's grievances.
MS. VERVEER: It's been part of our journeys. But I often think that women may not think about this being a place for them, not just running for office, elective office, which is probably the hardest challenge of all if one looks at any of the data out there today, but certainly service at the national level, at the local level, school boards, town collectives that come together to solve problems. This has obviously been a huge reward in your life. You've demonstrated exceptional leadership skills. Help us understand why this is a real opportunity for women and the rewards of this.
Stocks. They represent a part ownership in a company or corporation, also known as business equity. Basically, when a company performs well, the stock tends to increase in value. Stocks tend to be more volatile investments, meaning they can give you a high return on your investment long-term but tend to have larger swings in value in the short-term.

I was partially being sarcastic. However, I think the comment probably holds some merit, as unfair as it may be. In addition, I don't think that it relates only to finance, but in business in general. I think from a hiring standpoint, for whatever reason, appearance absolutely can play a role in the decision-making process. I also think that, again for whatever reason, it probably plays a bigger role when the hiring decision pertains to a female.
Bourke also understands the importance of relationship-building in investment banking. “Because our business is one that values both results and relationships, and because wisdom typically surfaces when like-minded people are challenged by new and different thinking, both Allegiance and our clients resoundingly believe that a diverse workforce will always outperform one that is overly homogenous.”
Opinions represent WFII’s opinion and are for general informational purposes only and are not intended to predict or guarantee the future performance of any individual security, market sector or the markets generally. WFII does not undertake to advise you of any change in its opinions or the information contained on this website. Wells Fargo & Company affiliates may issue reports or have opinions that are inconsistent with, and reach different conclusions from, this report.
MS. NELSON: All right. Katerina, I want to, I want to come back to you and some of what you were talking about about the power of mentoring and partnership, and also bring together a strand that Melanne was talking about earlier, the idea of needing networks, and how valuable networks are. And one of the things that we've found at Vital Voices, because ultimately what we are is a network of 15,000 women leaders around the world, across different sectors, as well as mentors and others, and what we've definitely seen is that there's something about women being part of a non-competitive and non-hierarchical network, that it encourages women leaders to take risks that they wouldn't have normally taken. Can you talk about, I mean did you have that experience? I mean I know you're sort of a risk-taker by design, as an entrepreneur you have to be. But I'm curious, I mean what's next for you and what has, what has been unleashed through gaining more support and mentoring?
Study after study has shown that women are less aggressive than men when it comes to investing. There are various arguments about why this is so. One theory is that that lower earnings from smaller paychecks result in a more conservative approach, as women try not lose what little they have. Another suggests that biology and the maternal instinct play a role, arguing that the protective instinct often credited to mothers makes them more reluctant to take risks.  Potential reasons aside, the more conservative approach to investing is generally associated with a variety of traits, including greater risk aversion, more concern about losses and less frequent trading. According to popular logic, these are all negative attributes to have when your objective is to make money in the financial markets. 
As I stated in my previous comment, I truly believe that the cultural scars and its consequent lack of representativity is the biggest cause of the few women acting in this kind of competition and going tho this area in the university. Problems like the time some girls have to spend cleaning the house because their parents say they must do it exists of course. But as I already said (previous comment) I myself, a boy, have obligations that spend some of my time, which I could use to study even more (of course, I do this by my own will, but see: in the case of selfish parents that really do care more about if the house is clean of not than if their daughter has good grades or a medal in an olympiad, I think they would prefer to show of themselves due to their daughter award. Anyway, actually they, fortunately, are not majority). Other way to conclude that the problem is in this area (STEM and similar) and not in the girls or their condition is to see that in fact there are many girls having excellent grades and getting into great universities. I’m currently trying to apply to good universities abroad and many of the exemples I have (and follow) of people who did it and got extraordinary results are women (actually, I think that the best results I know are of girls). But many of them simply do not chose this area. And so I think that we can blame this lack of representativity, which comes from a long time ago but is being grativaly erased by groups like “Olympic Girls” and “Girls Who Invest”.
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