Ellevest’s “What The Elle” Newsletter. The Ellevest site as a whole is my favorite resource for women-specific investment research and advice. They have content about the gender pay gap, how to invest responsibly, how to negotiate for a raise, and every financial topic in between. Their co-founder and CEO Sallie Krawcheck has a monthly newsletter called “What The Elle” that gives insights into everyday investing and financial advice for women.
As you near your retirement, you should start moving some of your risky investments to safer avenues such as Debt Mutual Funds. But don’t give up investing in equities yet. Inflation will have a huge impact on your savings once you retire and equities are the only investments that can save you in the long run. Ensure that you have set up different income sources so that you don’t run the risk of lower returns from one income source.
2. Most banker chicks I have met are hardcore nerds. They went to the best high schools in their respective countries. They are top 10% of their class. If they were here for their MBA, they went to top notch undergraduates either in the US or in their home countries. I haven't forgotten about American born Chinese (ABC). All of these banker chicks went to Ivy League.

thank you for your comment. i have been making some peripheral observations based on my older sibling's friends and classmates who are considering IB related works after college. based on my non representative samplings, those who are going into IB --at least the applying stage-- are typical alpha male loud mouth who try to get ahead by stepping on others. others are turned off by this. thus i want to assess on my own if IB community is actually looking for competitive folks that are competitive in that manner. i want to hear the facts or real experiences, instead of PC talk.


Define your goals: Get to the heart of what's important to you by thinking critically about investment goals. Sabbia mentioned preparing for personal retirement, saving for children's educational needs, or leaving a charitable gift for the next generation as potential goals. She also mentioned a key difference in how women invest. "While women care about performance, they also look for their investments to align with their values, goals and priorities," Sabbia said. "In fact, more than half of women investors are interested in or engaged in impact investing, generating financial returns along with social returns." Sabbia mentions that whether it's for your own family or a meaningful cause to help others, having clear goals that link to a clear strategy is key to success. And the ripple effect from that empowerment could extend far beyond your own backyard. Increased participation in investing could benefit communities overall. "If more women can actively take control of their financial future all along the way, it would not only benefit them, but also their families and our society overall,” said Maddy Dychtwald, co-founder and senior vice president of Age Wave.
You’ve heard the stats that there are more CEOs named John in the U.S. than there are women CEOs? You don’t want to fall behind the Johns where you work, and that’s what will happen if your company isn’t willing to invest in you. Fortunately, you’re now armed with lots of bragging points and a great sense of the market value of what you do, which will help you seek out the next great opportunity and negotiate your new offers like a pro.

BOSTON — When it comes to saving and investing one's hard earned money, who has greater overall success: men or women? If your immediate reaction was "men," then a new study from Fidelity Investments® may come as something of a surprise—and you wouldn't be alone. In fact, when asked who they believed made the better investor this past year, a mere nine percent of women thought they would outperform men1. And yet, a growing body of evidence, including an analysis of more than eight million clients from Fidelity2, shows that women actually tend to outperform men when it comes to generating a return on their investments.
Open your first ANZ Online Saver account and you'll receive an introductory fixed bonus rate of % p.a. for 3 months, on top of the ANZ Online Saver standard variable rate (currently ).  After 3 months, the ANZ Online Saver standard variable rate, applicable at that time, will apply. The introductory fixed bonus rate is only available on the first ANZ Online Saver account opened by customers who have not held an ANZ Online Saver in the last 6 months. In case of joint account holders, the introductory fixed bonus rate offer will only be received if all customers are eligible.
Against this backdrop, countless talented female bankers have emerged in positions of power and influence in the last ten years, and contributed to the region's thriving status. Going by the strong network of up and coming female financiers, women will continue their march on high finance in Asia. finews.asia names the region's top twelve most influential female bankers.
“The more women manage funds, the more funds get channeled into issues women care about,” says Nathalie Molina Niño, CEO of Brava Investments. “When someone brings on one female fund manager, we’re talking about potentially billions of dollars that get moved in a different direction.” She says that questions like “How many of your fund managers are women?” used to be rare in the industry, but now that more and more people are asking, large institutions are getting nervous—mostly because the answer is often “none” or “few.”
My boss once told me to always have the strength to admit when I’m wrong. There’s nothing more intimidating than realizing you’ve made a mistake, and it takes a lot of confidence and courage to admit it. Just remember that we’re all human, and it’s better to own up to mistakes rather than hide them. (Plus they rarely stay hidden). It really builds respect and trust among a team.

It probably shouldn’t be surprising that women aren’t investing as much: The financial industry is still one of the biggest old-boys’ games in town. Don’t believe it? Check this ratio: Financial advisors and traders are 86% to 90% men. That leaves the 70% of women who say they would prefer to work with a female Financial Advisory without all that many options.

One senior woman at a European bank argued that the push to promote more women is itself problematic. "The senior men have now got a cover for promoting the younger women who flirt with them," she said. "They know they have to promote X number of women each year, so they look around and they promote the women who kiss up to them most instead of the women who are the most competent. It's the same as the old boys' network, with flirtation instead of familiarity."
although it sounds great---i am not being argumentative--that more females are getting into fields previously dominated by males, i think it is still an uphill battle thus important to get a feel to the environment and culture. there may be unwarranted traditions, but there may also be some practical considerations, that is, some fields are better suited for one sex vs the other for understandable reasons. say, most top surgeons are males. heck, most top OB GYNs are males!

Like Olivia Ott’s, my perception of asset management and finance is not an extremely positive one. Although I really like economics and do consider going into finance, I feel like it is still a male-dominated industry. Sheryl Sandberg says that we women have to “lean in” in the workplace, but that is easier said than done. Even in school, I feel uneasy to speak up in a class dominated by boys, imagine the same scenario, but in the workplace!

MS. TURLINGTON BURNS: Yes, I did finish high school, thankfully. And then that made it a little bit easier, and then I went to NYU and studied Comparative Religion and Eastern Philosophy, which actually also plays a role culturally in the work that we do now. And then later, once I became a mom, I went back to school for Public Health. So, I did do a little bit of advocacy before going back to school or during the first time I went back. My father had lung cancer and I had been a smoker in my early 20s, and so my first public health—I know, and I have a grandfather from North Carolina and tobacco—
When it comes to the day-to-day decisions of their bosses, women describe environments that are biased against them. Though some men do report observing bias, far fewer of them see it than women do. Women (9 percent) are about twice as likely as men (4 percent) to say that they see their company’s management withhold opportunity or promotion from women. Women (8 percent) are also about four times as likely as men (2 percent) to believe women are excluded from networking and social opportunities, such as after-work drinks or golf outings.
Investment banker and VP Tamara Stasny says it’s important to pay attention to who the clients really are to determine how they can get value for their businesses. Stasny brings with her a vast amount of experience in the energy sector, including owning an energy company herself. Stasny says she “can relate to the clients, because I put the sweat equity in. It’s very personal.”
It’s a phenomenon some money experts call “the female financial paradox”: Women are a growing economic force, expected to add $6 trillion in earned income globally over the next five years, according to new research by The Boston Consulting Group released in 2013. Yet many women lag behind men when it comes to using those assets to plan and build financial security for the future.
Here’s what’s interesting about being a good investor. By and large, it’s not about doing research on stocks, or having a good gut instinct, or knowing what’s going on in the biotech industry. For people to build wealth in the long term, there is one trait that matters the most: being disciplined. It’s important to know that trying to time the market—selling before you think it’s going to crash, buying when you think it’s going to rally—is historically very unsuccessful. What’s more successful is having a financial plan and sticking to it regardless of what’s going on.
Saul M. Simon, a certified financial planner with Simon Financial Group in Edison, N.J., recommends women investors start investing at work in their 401k or 403b retirement plans. Every dollar that goes into these plans reduces current income taxes. In addition, the money grows tax-deferred, and in many cases the employer matches a portion of your investment.
2. Make “friends” with risk. Women prefer to preserve wealth even if it means giving up higher returns. Take a 51-year-old attorney (who preferred not to give her name) as an example; she has consistently contributed the maximum allowed by her law firm’s retirement plan. “I know I should be investing in stocks, but I don’t want a repeat of 2008. My money is parked in a money market fund, where I know it’s safe.”
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