"When it comes to thinking about women in powerful positions, we are too often blinded by the daggers of the mind, infected by the malignant mind bugs that mire us in the prejudices of the past," IMF Managing Director Christine Lagarde once famously said. "We need a 21st century mentality for women’s economic participation. We need to flush away the flotsam of ingrained gender inequality."
According to Veris Wealth Partners and Catalyst At Large, investment-advice firms, by last June $910m was invested with a gender-lens mandate across 22 publicly traded products, up from $100m and eight products in 2014. Private markets are hard to track, but according to Project Sage, which scans private-equity, venture and debt funds, $1.3bn had been raised by mid-2017 for investing with a gender lens.
As mentioned, this has been answered many times. From investment bankers I know, most of the media's portrayal is exaggerated. Yes hours are long and you have to be driven to win. But that doesn't mean you go around swearing and yelling in people's faces - usually IBankers do the opposite. You need to have a competitive drive and be a people's person. The industry has many females nowadays just like engineering. You are far from alone if you choose to do IB. If you are acquiescent and fear being a in a tough, competitive environment, then you shouldn't go into IB whether you are boy or girl. Stop assuming girls are somehow weaker than males and therefore are unfit in IB. There are guys and girls who do well and don't do well in IB.
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Well, well, well. After being locked out of the financial world for centuries, women are now besting men when it comes to investing returns. Not only do women consistently earn higher returns than men (by 40 basis points on average), they were also able to add more to their account balances over time (12.4 percent compared to 11.6 percent ), according to a study by Fidelity.

MS. SPELLINGS: Well, it was a super fun partnership that was a partnership between President Clinton, President Bush, President H.W. Bush, his center, and the LBJ Library in Austin. So, in that Arkansas/Texas region we have four Presidential, Presidential Libraries. And the idea was to help develop mid-career, civically-engaged leaders, using those four presidencies as case studies in leadership around decision making, around vision and planning, around building coalitions and whatnot, and you all ought to get on the website because it looks like there's some presidential leadership scholar candidates in here. President Bush and President Clinton stewarded this. We were able to raise funds to underwrite this because we need to develop leaders in this space so they can have the skills necessary, particularly in that mid-30s to, you know, mid-50s where you're out of graduate school if you've gone, but there, and you've got plenty of runway. So, how do you become, how do you lead at that level? Who better to do that than two presidents?
Zachary Cohen is an accomplished finance professional with over 18 years’ experience as an investment banker, project manager and corporate executive with aggregate deal and pitch experience totaling over $2.1 billion USD. Over the course of his career in finance, he has also worked at such firms as Merrill Lynch, ConocoPhillips, CB Richard Ellis, DPFG, InveStellar Corp., and Silver Fern Management. He has advised dozens of companies on a wide range of corporate finance and strategic initiatives.
MS. SMITH: Awesome. Well, thank you so much. This has been I think quite a treat for everyone, and we really appreciate you coming in. I know you've got a packed schedule and you're leaving shortly. So, thank you again and let's give Christy a round of applause. [Applause] And now, now I have the pleasure, as Christine mentioned earlier, we have an action-packed panel. So, now we have Melanne Verveer coming up who I'm sure everyone knows, but most recently a book, an ambassador, so many things. And Margaret Spellings, the President of our UNC systems. So, Melanne is going to interview I think Margaret, or maybe Margaret will interview Melanne, and it will be really fantastic. So, ladies, come on up.
Women live, on average, five to seven years longer than men (depending on when they were born). Their money has to stretch longer, and if they are married, it is important to note that some of the biggest health care costs are incurred in the year prior to death, so if they survive their husbands, it is possible that their financial resources may be reduced by medical expenses. Married women tend to suffer significant losses in income when their spouse dies.
If you’re looking to acquire new job skills in the new year, consider the following. Do you want to acquire skills that will make you more effective at your current job or a new one? Your answer to this question will help you determine which skills you should look at. Also, are you looking to invest money towards acquiring new skills? If so, there are a wealth of career and adult education/skill-development programs available across the country; a great place to start is researching the offerings at colleges and universities in your area. You’ll likely come across a wealth of options, both in class and online—you just need to decide which are right for you.
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thank you again. i am going to copy and paste that post for future reference and may indeed trouble you further for some guidance in the future so thanks in advance for your generousity. intuitively your comments ring to me. it is probably true in many fields that female coworkers are being accepted more and more, ON THE CONDITION that they are proven to be assets to the team and to prove one's worth, one probably has to come in earlier and leave later to be better prepared and ready to help at any moment and possibly rely on some maternal instincts to be mindful of the big picture. still, it won't hurt to know that generally speaking, the work environment in IB is not so hostile to females that it is uphill battle day in and day out even if one's work speaks competently for oneself. thanks for providing the clarity and reassurances.
Every investor makes mistakes. Sometimes it is an error of commission: You buy a real stinker. Sometimes it is an error of omission: You hang onto a loser, or a winner, for too long. But knowing what and when to sell is at least as important as knowing what to buy. “You have to know when to pull the plug,” says Sarah Ketterer, chief executive of Causeway Capital Management and the longtime comanager of her firm’s flagship fund, Causeway International Value (CIVVX).
Most of our female clients are savvy women who have recently become responsible for managing money on their own, even though they are very astute, they realize that they do not have enough experience and confidence to make good financial decisions. Discussions focused on PE ratios and comparing the performance of different investments are not a priority, women want information about reaching their goals and future planning. 

Betterment’s research found that in addition to taking a more hands-off approach, female investors were less likely to indulge in what Swift calls “erratic behavior,” meaning less likely to dump all of their stocks and go completely into bonds or vice versa. Although the majority of male investors in the study didn’t behave this way, men were nearly six times more likely than women to make this move.


Second, women are more successful investors. Terrance Odean and Brad Barber, who conducted the seminal piece of research on this phenomenon, showed women outperform men annually by about 1 percentage point. A study from Betterment, a computerized portfolio manager or “robo-advisor,” expands upon why. It looked at the accounts of around 60,000 investors, about one-quarter of them women. Female investors signed into their accounts 45% less frequently and changed their asset allocation 20% less frequently than male investors did.
Now Instagram is easier for me because it doesn’t take a lot of time. It’s a way of having an outlet without having the commitment of a blog. Instagram is just tidbits of your life and I like to go back and see what I was doing a year ago. You have this wave of memories coming at you. I wanted to have some way to record what I did. I do have a photographic memory so having a photo to me is very important because it brings different memories of that day and what happened.

Investment of capital makes the global economy run, every day. The U.S. would have struggled to create a national economy post World War II without money invested by asset management firms to build its highway infrastructure. Renewable energy sources such as solar and wind would not be a reality today, and in certain parts of the developing world, people would still be without clean drinking water if not for investment in water treatment facilities.
MS. NELSON: Lots of great, great advice. I think you know often times people underestimate the power of mentoring and think oh that's sort of soft, but actually what I have seen in 20 years of working with Vital Voices is that it's a strategy, it works. My mentor here, she always hates that I acknowledge her, but my mentor here Melanne, I know I wouldn't be in the job that I'm in without her. And I think that mentors are the people who don't just pull you up, but also are the ones that are willing to stand behind you and believe in you, maybe even sometimes as you said, you know, before you believe in yourself.
Americans as a whole are drastically under-saved for retirement. According to a recent report by the Economic Policy Institute, nearly half of all families have no retirement-account savings at all.1 Women are disproportionately impacted by this shortfall for a number of reasons. Consider the socioeconomic factors that are creating obstacles for women in America today:
“My biggest advice to women who want to save more money is to make more money,” said financial expert Nicole Lapin, the winner of GOBankingRates.com’s 2015 Best Money Expert competition. “When you stop looking at your financial life as something of deprivation and more of something as aspiration, that’s when you actually feel comfortable of taking control of your own finances.”
In the survey, 79 percent of Hispanic and African American respondents said it is in the best interest of the firms to focus on hiring minority advisors to better reflect their overall client base and the population at large. Seventy-three percent of Hispanics and 79 percent of African Americans believe it’s in the best interest of clients to have a more diverse advisor force.
I was partially being sarcastic. However, I think the comment probably holds some merit, as unfair as it may be. In addition, I don't think that it relates only to finance, but in business in general. I think from a hiring standpoint, for whatever reason, appearance absolutely can play a role in the decision-making process. I also think that, again for whatever reason, it probably plays a bigger role when the hiring decision pertains to a female.
Women are different from men in many ways, one of which is their interests. They could offer an insight into an investment that a man would have otherwise not thought of – say, for instance, Kylie’s Cosmetics which today is worth $900 million. This might be a stereotypical argument, but I am pretty sure that a heterosexual man would not have thought of investing in such a company, whereas a woman might have. Therefore, an asset management business that integrates and welcomes women into the workplace could possibly have unique insights and advantages over its competitors that do not do so.
Most women don’t think they know enough about investing to properly grow their savings; therefore, they wait to start investing until they feel they’re more financially stable and believe they can risk the possibility of losing money. A common misconception around investing is that you have to be an expert in the industry to succeed when the reality is that there are so many tools and resources that make easy to start investing with as little as your pocket change.
It is definitely doable. I am acquainted with one female at Barclays(some of you might know who I'm talking about) who has managed to wield a massive amount of influence over the company as an associate to where she is more or less a gatekeeper for MBA recruiting. She's very direct, very professional, and very people smart...and she didn't get to where she is by trying to by imitating someone else. She crafted and managed her own unique brand.
Investing is not some get-rich-quick scheme and there is always a degree of risk. But those women who are comfortable with that risk should not be deterred by the aggressive macho investor stereotype. The proof of the increasing success of women in the world of investing can be seen in the female-focused investment firms that have sprung up. As Alexander Taussig, the senior vice president for women investors at Fidelity, has said, "The myth that men are better investors is just that -- a myth."

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