I always hear about the frat-like feel, models and bottles etc .. But where do the girls fit in here ? What is the male to female ratio like ? Do the females hang out separately from the males, or do they join in on the bottle popping ? What about the females on the higher ranks of this career ? What do you think is generally the kind of girl that goes for this field ?

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Women Who Lead invests in the stocks of 169 companies, as of December 8, 2017*, including many that you probably interact with on a daily basis. These include Coca-Cola, McDonald’s, IBM, Mastercard, and PepsiCo. The fund also includes shares in the pharmaceutical giant Pfizer, calculator and semiconductor producer Texas Instruments, as well as defense company Lockheed Martin.
Says Bourke, “In the first part of 2014, we completed four oil and gas deals totaling $350 million. We found, even in the heart of the oil patch, traditionally known as a male dominated industry, it is more the exception than the rule that both the decision to sell as well as the selection of the most appropriate buyer was a joint decision involving a central female stakeholder. It makes business sense to direct deliberate attention to building an investment banking firm that leverages the talent and experience of the female workforce.”
MS. TURLINGTON BURNS: Sure. So, I have a thirteen-and-a-half-year-old daughter, and that was the baby that you saw in the video. When I delivered her, actually after I delivered her, I experienced a post-partum hemorrhage. I had a perfectly healthy pregnancy, and there was absolutely no indication during my pregnancy that I would have a complication like that. But luckily, I was in a birthing center within a hospital in New York City, and a team of providers that worked seamlessly together to make sure that my complication was managed and I was fine, and my daughter was fine. However, in the weeks after this experience I learned that globally in 2003, the global estimates for a pregnancy and childbirth-related complications and deaths were beyond half-a-million. And that just really struck me, like, "Why do I not know this? I can't believe I went into this experience not knowing this." And I felt like I had to learn more about why this was happening. And I learned that most of these deaths are preventable. Which beg the question, "Well why if we know how to save these lives, are we allowing these lives to be lost?" Which continues to be a goal in uncovering, you know, in many, many countries, including this one, why are we allowing women to die when we know how to make sure that they don't?
Well, the vision that people in general have about this market is one of a bunch of heartless, greed peolpe seeking more and more proft, in order to get richer. But it’s not like this. Of course, it’s in some e way about “making” money, yet it can be done without damaging people and can be used to generate good for the world. To train the future business leaders to know the imortance of it, and to select people using as a criteria their will to help the world, making it a better place, is a way to reinforce this perspective.
This report is not intended to be a client-specific suitability analysis or recommendation; an offer to participate in any investment; or a recommendation to buy, hold, or sell securities. Do not use this report as the sole basis for investment decisions. Do not select an asset class or investment product based on performance alone. Consider all relevant information, including your existing portfolio, investment objectives, risk tolerance, liquidity needs, and investment time horizon.
MS. TURLINGTON BURNS: It's a huge problem, and it's going to get worse. We have done a series of films called "Giving Birth in America" where we look through state-by-state at maternal healthcare. And one of the first films that we did was in Montana and there, you know, we had a family, a Caucasian family, highly educated, lots of kids, but that lived far away, just lived in a large state in a rural part of the state, and so when an emergency happened they were far away. I mean the woman survived, but it was, it was almost as if you could be in Sub-Saharan Africa and have the same problem. If you have a post-partum hemorrhage, you could bleed to death in under two hours if you don't get to care. So, you can see some of the same challenges as you do anywhere. I think what's most important is really having many levels of trained health providers, so community health workers, doulas, midwives, nurses, and doctors when necessary. Sometimes in the United States we have a tendency to over-medicalize birth, and so you might rush to a doctor who you don't necessarily need to see.
Free tools designed for women. Fidelity.com/itstime was designed to provide insights and next steps around the life events that matter most to women, whether you're about to get married, changing careers or caring for aging parents. Available here are talks and workshops, articles, checklists, and other guidance targeted to help navigate financial challenges.
As CEO of the Marketing Zen Group, we work with clients in a variety of industries, finance being one of them. Recently, I was pleasantly surprised to learn that one of our clients, Allegiance Capital Corporation, a premier middle-market investment bank, had launched a proactive initiative to attract more women for business development and investment banker roles. I was very curious to learn more. What compelled them to encourage women in an industry which has historically been known to be a “boys only” club?
Here, we have a ways to go. Maybe you’ve heard of the gender pay gap. Frustrating, right? And costly. But there are more gaps at play: Women pay more for the debt they carry than men, and they don’t invest as much as men do. As a result, women retire with two-thirds the money of men…even though we tend to live years longer. Don’t believe me? Check the gender mix at your local nursing home: 80% of women die single, and they’re also 80% more likely to be impoverished in retirement than men. Yuck.
Note that even the reported numbers (which are sobering as P. Brown has stated above) appear to generously overstate the actual number of women in investment roles. This is due to lack of transparency and confusing websites on the part of private investment firms. If one were to further breakout non-investment professionals who are often listed on the investment team pages, the result would likely show ~0% to 5% of senior "investment professionals", defined as those making investment decisions, in the field of private equity are women. *For example, Blackstone includes women on the investment team pages who are serve in administrative and portfolio operations functions (i.e., women who don't make investment decisions) such as Chief Administrative Officer. Counting the number of women in the Private Equity department on the investment team without Administrative or Portfolio Operations roles, Blackstone's Private Equity (www.blackstone.com/the-firm/our-people -> Private Equity, Tactical Opportunities, Infrastructure) teams' female representation appears closer to 0% to 3%. Professor Lietz's study includes data on the largest Private Equity funds' female representation:
All this will have big implications for asset managers. Take risk-profiling. Surveys show that men’s attitudes to risk are typically more gung-ho, whereas women are more likely to buy and hold, which leads advisers to conclude that men are less risk-averse. And men are more likely to say that they understand financial concepts, which might seem to suggest that they are more financially literate.
At this age, women are usually married and might even have children. They have the additional responsibility of caring for a family. Women must remain invested in Mutual Funds and should also hold Life Insurance policies. One Life Insurance policy for each earning member in the family is a must. It is also important to invest for your children’s future. Mutual Fund Systematic Investment Plans (SIP) are a good way to start. You can, of course, choose the Sukanya Samridhi Yojana, if you have a girl child. And you can choose to invest in real estate. However, it will be prudent to buy a home to live in before investing in real estate. Taking a joint Home Loan will give you higher eligibility. Some banks give concessional interest rates to women. Make use of this.

If you’ve invested long enough, you know that stock markets are prone to bubbles and busts (the sharp drop early in 2016 was an example of the latter). The problem for most of us is that we tend toward euphoria during bubbles and depression during busts. As a result, we often make the wrong decision at the wrong time—-that is, we tend to buy when we’re euphoric and prices are high, and sell when we’re depressed and prices are low.
MS. TURLINGTON BURNS: It's a huge problem, and it's going to get worse. We have done a series of films called "Giving Birth in America" where we look through state-by-state at maternal healthcare. And one of the first films that we did was in Montana and there, you know, we had a family, a Caucasian family, highly educated, lots of kids, but that lived far away, just lived in a large state in a rural part of the state, and so when an emergency happened they were far away. I mean the woman survived, but it was, it was almost as if you could be in Sub-Saharan Africa and have the same problem. If you have a post-partum hemorrhage, you could bleed to death in under two hours if you don't get to care. So, you can see some of the same challenges as you do anywhere. I think what's most important is really having many levels of trained health providers, so community health workers, doulas, midwives, nurses, and doctors when necessary. Sometimes in the United States we have a tendency to over-medicalize birth, and so you might rush to a doctor who you don't necessarily need to see. 

Communicate. If you have questions, your friends and family probably do too. Not only is it time for money to stop being a taboo conversation topic, but ensuring you're on the same page with your loved ones about financial goals and responsibilities can be critical. Fidelity has numerous resources to help have these conversations with parents, partners and kids.
And if you’re new to the table, bring a friend. Murphy has recently criss-crossed the country speaking to groups of women about their money. She notes that one thing that helps reluctant women get involved is to do it with a friend. Events where the invite has said “bring a friend” draw standing room-only crowds, she says. “Women love talking to each other about their experiences and once they get started they do very well. There’s an unwarranted confidence gap that doesn’t play out.”
We had both a female and male managing director who attended and gave us tips and funny anecdotes on the topic. The event was particularly directed to first year analysts to help us feel more confident at work. The event also gave junior women the opportunity to meet with female directors and socialise with other women from different departments within the bank.

However, after talking to more professionals in the finance field and reading articles like this, I have regained my faith in finance and became a co-leader for the finance club at my high school. My biggest concern is the one depicted in this article: the club has an extreme lack of female members (we only had one last year). As you have mentioned, this is unfortunate as diversity fosters more informed decisions. Similarly, Kelly Loeffler of Intercontinental Exchange, who was quoted in the KWHS article titled “Career Insight: Advice from New York Stock Exchange President Stacey Cunningham”, believes that gender should not be a limiting factor for the expression of intellectual curiosity. You mentioned how you felt uneasy in male-dominated classes, and as a male, I never had to go through the same feelings, but I certainly want to change this limiting atmosphere in academic settings. I think your mentioning of Kylie’s Cosmetics is a perfect example of how more female members could allow the male-dominated industry to make more informed and wise investments. Yet even though we recently had a female member take upon a leadership position, many other female classmates I’ve talked told have told me that the finance industry was “disgusting” and filled with greedy, misogynistic men. 

As I stated in my previous comment, I truly believe that the cultural scars and its consequent lack of representativity is the biggest cause of the few women acting in this kind of competition and going tho this area in the university. Problems like the time some girls have to spend cleaning the house because their parents say they must do it exists of course. But as I already said (previous comment) I myself, a boy, have obligations that spend some of my time, which I could use to study even more (of course, I do this by my own will, but see: in the case of selfish parents that really do care more about if the house is clean of not than if their daughter has good grades or a medal in an olympiad, I think they would prefer to show of themselves due to their daughter award. Anyway, actually they, fortunately, are not majority). Other way to conclude that the problem is in this area (STEM and similar) and not in the girls or their condition is to see that in fact there are many girls having excellent grades and getting into great universities. I’m currently trying to apply to good universities abroad and many of the exemples I have (and follow) of people who did it and got extraordinary results are women (actually, I think that the best results I know are of girls). But many of them simply do not chose this area. And so I think that we can blame this lack of representativity, which comes from a long time ago but is being grativaly erased by groups like “Olympic Girls” and “Girls Who Invest”.
Investment of capital makes the global economy run, every day. The U.S. would have struggled to create a national economy post World War II without money invested by asset management firms to build its highway infrastructure. Renewable energy sources such as solar and wind would not be a reality today, and in certain parts of the developing world, people would still be without clean drinking water if not for investment in water treatment facilities.
I always hear about the frat-like feel, models and bottles etc .. But where do the girls fit in here ? What is the male to female ratio like ? Do the females hang out separately from the males, or do they join in on the bottle popping ? What about the females on the higher ranks of this career ? What do you think is generally the kind of girl that goes for this field ?
As mentioned, this has been answered many times. From investment bankers I know, most of the media's portrayal is exaggerated. Yes hours are long and you have to be driven to win. But that doesn't mean you go around swearing and yelling in people's faces - usually IBankers do the opposite. You need to have a competitive drive and be a people's person. The industry has many females nowadays just like engineering. You are far from alone if you choose to do IB. If you are acquiescent and fear being a in a tough, competitive environment, then you shouldn't go into IB whether you are boy or girl. Stop assuming girls are somehow weaker than males and therefore are unfit in IB. There are guys and girls who do well and don't do well in IB.
thank you again. i am going to copy and paste that post for future reference and may indeed trouble you further for some guidance in the future so thanks in advance for your generousity. intuitively your comments ring to me. it is probably true in many fields that female coworkers are being accepted more and more, ON THE CONDITION that they are proven to be assets to the team and to prove one's worth, one probably has to come in earlier and leave later to be better prepared and ready to help at any moment and possibly rely on some maternal instincts to be mindful of the big picture. still, it won't hurt to know that generally speaking, the work environment in IB is not so hostile to females that it is uphill battle day in and day out even if one's work speaks competently for oneself. thanks for providing the clarity and reassurances.
I was partially being sarcastic. However, I think the comment probably holds some merit, as unfair as it may be. In addition, I don't think that it relates only to finance, but in business in general. I think from a hiring standpoint, for whatever reason, appearance absolutely can play a role in the decision-making process. I also think that, again for whatever reason, it probably plays a bigger role when the hiring decision pertains to a female.
For those who doubt that women can be successful investment bankers, there are a few examples such as Marisa Drew, a co-head of Global Markets at Credit Suisse, who has worked in investment banking for over twenty-five years, starting her career as an analyst back in 1986. Another good example is Mary Callahan Erdoes, who has been serving as the chief executive of JPMorgan Asset Management since 2009 where she oversees more than $2 trillion. Ruth Porat also deserves a mention, having worked as chief financial officer and executive vice president of Morgan Stanley between 2010 and 2015, when she decided to leave the bank for Google where she became the tech giant’s first female CFO.

October 14, 2018, JAKARTA –  An important editorial on widening women’s access to financial services by Taimur Baig, Chief Economist of DBS Bank and member of Women’s World Banking’s Southeast Advisory Council, has been published in a special IMF edition of The Jakarta Post. The 2016 Financial Inclusion Survey, carried out by the Financial Service […]


In the meantime, FirstCapital is looking for an analyst. We have a very open, inclusive, collaborative culture, which I and my fellow directors have worked hard to establish and to foster. See the video here from some of my colleagues. Male or female, if you like what you do, but not the environment you are in, don't leave the industry, send me your CV!
“We were then left with a chunk of that cash plus some Unilever share options. That’s the point where Jennie really wasn’t interested,” says Mr Byrne. Initially he invested in a low-cost “tracker” fund that simply mirrored the performance of the FTSE 100 index, but after building up his confidence he put money in funds run by professional managers, which have delivered better returns.
But fees are tricky, and a lot of them are hard to find. For instance, sometimes you’re charged for the trades made on your behalf. This is typical when someone is buying and selling individual stocks on your behalf. A lot of the financial products you may be invested in—mutual funds, exchange-traded funds, and so on—also charge a fee. For instance, Wealthsimple invests exclusively in exchange traded funds; they have much lower fees than mutual funds but they do still have a fee.
MS. MELANNE VERVEER: Well, good afternoon everybody. It's a real personal pleasure for me to be here today. I can't tell you how inspired I was listening to Christy, and if she has proven anything it's that one person can make a difference. So, I think that's the lesson to take out of that. And thank you to Bank of America for all that you do in making not just this possible but so much more.
Remember that there are many different definitions of "retirement." You don't have to attain some preconceived ideal. To reference our survey again, though the largest percentage of our respondents said they planned on a traditional retirement (i.e., leaving the workforce entirely between ages 65 and 70), a significant portion also reported making the forced or unforced choice to put off retirement or transition to a second career.6
Women are different from men in many ways, one of which is their interests. They could offer an insight into an investment that a man would have otherwise not thought of – say, for instance, Kylie’s Cosmetics which today is worth $900 million. This might be a stereotypical argument, but I am pretty sure that a heterosexual man would not have thought of investing in such a company, whereas a woman might have. Therefore, an asset management business that integrates and welcomes women into the workplace could possibly have unique insights and advantages over its competitors that do not do so.

Correct you also see this through entry criteria for them being massively lowered (have seen the typical psychometric test scores getting lowered by30-50pc), so the average that enters IBD will be much lower. HFs and to a much lesser extent PE firms really could not care less about diversity policies so will just hire meritocratically (in an ideal world anyway) and given the average women out of banking may be a worse candidate than the average guy your conversion to PE/HF may well be lower. This is just simple statistics not some great discrimination scheme.

Women approach risk differently than men do. Studies show that men are more inclined to behave like baseball sluggers, who swing for the fences, even if it means running the risk of striking out far more often. Women, by contrast, are more like contact hitters, who are satisfied with a string of singles. These tendencies show up in various forms. For example, a 2013 study by Fidelity Investments found that men were much more likely than women to hold 100% of their assets in stocks. Openfolio’s data show that portfolios owned by men are subject to far wider swings in value. The problem is that investors who strike out frequently because they’re always trying to smash home runs can undermine their results.
I certainly agree with your analysis. As you and some of the GWI scholars have mentioned, the finance industry is often depicted with its misogyny, corruption, and greed. I think this skewed and incomplete depiction of the finance industry is a huge obstacle in diversifying employment in the industry in terms of both race and gender. My relationship in finance began when I interned at a private equity firm in Shanghai, China two years ago. I overheard a private equity manager say it was “fortunate” that many Chinese workers were being burnt, as it helped the sales of a medical company that the firm invested in. It was like a scene straight out of the Wolf of Wall Street, steering me away from the money-driven industry.
As  banks' claims to diversity are blown apart by the figures emerging from the UK's gender pay gap reporting requirements, how does it feel to be a woman in finance? Do you buy the Goldman story that men and women are paid equally for equal work and it's just a question of getting more women into senior slots, or do you get angry and point to more insidious issues?
“TFS Scholarships was inspired by my own father’s experience as an inner-city high school principal, and grew out of the realization that more could be done to support students searching for college scholarships,” said Richard Sorensen, president of TFS Scholarships. “For more than 30 years, TFS has helped students achieve their higher education aspirations by making it easier to find essential funding for college.”
Be judicious about reporting it. If it happens during an on-campus interview, talk to your college career office. They’ll determine how to address it with the company and can anonymize their report. It’s harder to report harassment if it happens at an informal event and you’re not an employee of the firm. As much as I hate to let guys get away with this behavior, you may have to let it go for the time being if that’s the case. Calling the firm to report him runs the risk of branding you as a potential liability – but you can tell other women in your network about it so they know to watch out.
Investing itself, we’re in favor of. (You might have picked up on that, since we’re a company named Ellevest.) Especially investing in low-cost, well-diversified investment portfolios. That’s because — we’ve said it before, and we’ll keep saying it — we really, really need to fix the gender investing gap. Women don’t invest as much as men — we keep 71% of our money in cash (in other words, out of the market). This is part of the reason that we retire with two-thirds the money of men (even though we live longer).

But anyway, so I think the first thing is we have to say that is our expectation. It's our expectation that, you know, nearly everybody, 70% of the jobs in this state damn near are going to require post-secondary education, not necessarily a baccalaureate degree, but at least two years of education with a credential after high school, an associate's degree, some kind of stackable credential, a skill. Certainly the jobs at this organization are, certainly the jobs that you all are creating as entrepreneurs and leaders require skill and knowledge.


If you’re the big spender type, the Wally app is just for you. This app not only helps you plan, manage and categorize your finances, it also gives you insight into your spending and saving habits and how you can improve to achieve your financial goals through its algorithm. The downside? The app doesn’t have a desktop money management feature or a blog section to keep you intrigued about money.
‘It’s not really relevant whether you are a man or a woman in investment banking,’ said Lorraine. ‘You are one of the team from the beginning.’ Macquarie Capital’s Tara agreed: ‘Men and women face very similar challenges; all employees have to evolve and make a successful transition from an analyst to being able to sell and generate money. It’s the same for men and women in that respect.’
Break the silence on money. " Our study found that 61% of women would rather discuss details of their own death over money topics ," Sabbia said. "This is impeding women’s financial empowerment and preventing them from taking needed action to build up wealth." Sabbia suggest that women with more advanced knowledge should encourage and lead open discussions with other women about financial and investing goals, concerns and fears.  Discussions could be in and outside of the workplace, by holding "investing 101" events or even more casual and intimate small group coffees or dinners. That sort of venue could help encourage women to share investing success stories, advice and actionable tips for getting started.

Whether your funds come from family, student loans, scholarships or your own wallet, you’ll need to budget for expenses like textbooks, housing and, yes, a social life. Knowing who’s footing the bill, what costs to expect and which ones you can live without — ideally before school starts — can reduce stress and help you form healthy financial habits for the future.

MS. URZAIZ: That's right. We wanted to be better, and decided that a way to prove that we're doing above and beyond what is in our hands we decided to become Fair Trade Certified, and not only that B Corp, for those of you who know what B Corp is, which means we do above and beyond. We're not only committed with our suppliers, that is the weavers, but also with the environment and with the community as a whole giving back.
To kick off FUND Conference in Chicago this Fall, it is our honor to host the second Women Investing in Women (WiW) event. This exclusive event will feature keynotes, fireside discussions, and panels that focus on advancing women-led companies and bridging the unacceptable gender gap in business. A working lunch will match attendees with the resources they need to grow their business. This is an opportunity to create powerful relationships and networks to generate deal-flow for women-owned companies and the investors, service providers and communities who support them.
Learn the basics: Sabbia mentions that the easiest first step is to simply expose yourself to trusted financial resources and education. This approach can be crucial to gradually bridging that confidence gap for women. "Whether it be conducting personal research, enrolling in an online class or consulting with an expert, spend some time learning investing fundamentals," Sabbia suggests.
But rather than pitch men and women and their typical respective styles against each other, we might look to the success of diverse teams across the business world for a far more productive use of this information. A widely circulated study undertaken by McKinsey & Company found that companies in the top quartile for gender diversity on their executive teams were 21 percent more likely to experience above-average profitability. And in February this year, it was discovered that funds managed by mixed gender teams attracted 6 percent more inflows than those run solely by men or women over three years. Diversity, it’s clear, is good for business.

We had both a female and male managing director who attended and gave us tips and funny anecdotes on the topic. The event was particularly directed to first year analysts to help us feel more confident at work. The event also gave junior women the opportunity to meet with female directors and socialise with other women from different departments within the bank.

If you’ve invested long enough, you know that stock markets are prone to bubbles and busts (the sharp drop early in 2016 was an example of the latter). The problem for most of us is that we tend toward euphoria during bubbles and depression during busts. As a result, we often make the wrong decision at the wrong time—-that is, we tend to buy when we’re euphoric and prices are high, and sell when we’re depressed and prices are low.

Communicate. If you have questions, your friends and family probably do too. Not only is it time for money to stop being a taboo conversation topic, but ensuring you're on the same page with your loved ones about financial goals and responsibilities can be critical. Fidelity has numerous resources to help have these conversations with parents, partners and kids. 

Although making a big career change can be a wonderful moment in your life, acting impulsively could really backfire. There are countless stories of people who made quick decisions to leave their current working worlds for new ones, only to discover that they were ill-informed and really had no idea what they were getting into and wound up being just as unhappy—or even unhappier—as they were before. Don’t become just another unfortunate member of this group. Plan wisely and carefully, and you’ll be setting yourself up for a real shot at positive and lasting change.
I studied economics and business administration at Paris-Dauphine University and I completed several internships in France during the course of my degree. After completing a Masters in Banking and Finance, I was interested in learning more about investment banking. I applied for an internship in debt capital markets at J.P. Morgan, where I really enjoyed the fast-paced and challenging environment on the desk.
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