I'd have to agree with the above post. Don't act like a man. You're not , and it just looks weird. But that being said if you're super nice then you'd probably get taken advantage of, so for example, in an interview setting just be yourself. If you are super nice then you probably don't fit in the typical banking environment. After all, you don't want to land a job on the notion of you being someone completely different than you are. You will eventually get tired and want to quit becuase you can't stand to act like someone you're not.
Bonus interest is subject to eligibility. ANZ Progress Saver pays bonus interest (in addition to the current variable base interest) in respect of a particular month if the set minimum deposit (currently $10) and no withdrawals, fees or charges are processed to the account on or before the last business day of that calendar month, and after the last business day of the previous calendar month. Bonus and base rates are variable and subject to change.
To kick off FUND Conference in Chicago this Fall, it is our honor to host the second Women Investing in Women (WiW) event. This exclusive event will feature keynotes, fireside discussions, and panels that focus on advancing women-led companies and bridging the unacceptable gender gap in business. A working lunch will match attendees with the resources they need to grow their business. This is an opportunity to create powerful relationships and networks to generate deal-flow for women-owned companies and the investors, service providers and communities who support them.
MS. NELSON: All right. Katerina, I want to, I want to come back to you and some of what you were talking about about the power of mentoring and partnership, and also bring together a strand that Melanne was talking about earlier, the idea of needing networks, and how valuable networks are. And one of the things that we've found at Vital Voices, because ultimately what we are is a network of 15,000 women leaders around the world, across different sectors, as well as mentors and others, and what we've definitely seen is that there's something about women being part of a non-competitive and non-hierarchical network, that it encourages women leaders to take risks that they wouldn't have normally taken. Can you talk about, I mean did you have that experience? I mean I know you're sort of a risk-taker by design, as an entrepreneur you have to be. But I'm curious, I mean what's next for you and what has, what has been unleashed through gaining more support and mentoring?
He also found that cortisol levels rise during a market crash, increasing risk aversion among traders and exacerbating the decline. Since women have significant lower testosterone levels, Coates argues that they are less prone to the irrational exuberance associated with stock market bubbles. While the study by Coats is focused on biological factors, it is not the only study to draw similar conclusions with regard to the investment behavior differences between men and women.
MS. SARR: For me, it's funny because the most, the most impactful mentor I ever had was an American gentleman by the name of David from Texas, had he's been my biggest supporter, and he died in a plane crash in Texas two years ago, but he's been following me and even sometimes when I didn't believe in myself he gave me huge responsibilities as a CFO of a multi-million-dollar business. That was way before I joined the World Bank or the UN. But so, mentoring is extremely important. So, my ask tonight is for the men to really be our champions. We want them to be our he for she and say to other men I stand by my sister, I stand by my wife, I stand by my daughter. That's my first ask. My second ask is for the other women, you know, we tend to shy away sometimes from the activism but you just have to realize that you have a mandate. If every woman voted for a woman we will have plenty of women presidents around the world. So, you really, you really have a mandate to represent and to know that you are really, when you're sitting on that board meeting, when you're about to make, click that button that you're doing that on behalf of millions and billions of women around the world. They say that if every woman made a jump today we will have an earthquake. So, that's how powerful we are.
In the meantime, FirstCapital is looking for an analyst. We have a very open, inclusive, collaborative culture, which I and my fellow directors have worked hard to establish and to foster. See the video here from some of my colleagues. Male or female, if you like what you do, but not the environment you are in, don't leave the industry, send me your CV!
Maybe you haven’t been getting great signals that your boss would be terribly receptive to the idea of you asking for a promotion. If this sounds more like your reality, then it may be wise to concoct a more long-term plan. Spend the next several months—maybe even the entire next year—anticipating your boss’s needs, doing your job to the absolute best of your ability, and sowing the seeds for popping the big “promotion question” next year. Like we said earlier, sometimes you need a plan, and there’s nothing quite as defeating or draining as asking for a promotion before you’re ready and meeting rejection.
It also may make sense to refinance your mortgage, if you can lower the interest rate on your home loan enough for it to be worth the upfront cost and the time suck it can take. Usually it’s only worth exploring if you plan to stay in your house long enough to pay off the fees from the new loan and you can get a rate at least 1% to 2% lower. (Refinancing is something to look into right now, by the way, before interest rates go up again.)
Coming in, I expected that my colleagues would be ultra-Type A, all work/no play, super serious folks given the nature of our work. But I’ve been pleasantly surprised by the great relationships and friendships I’ve developed at work and the camaraderie on our floor. I also expected the job to be extremely difficult in terms of the learning curve and was worried about my ability to handle it. It certainly is challenging, but with the support of my colleagues and mentors, I can really map out how much I’ve grown and learned over the past year. Everyone wants each other to succeed.
The first thing I want to make clear is that women really are missing out right now. Investing is a huge wealth generator, and women, for one reason or another, tend to do it less. Seventy-one percent of the money women have is in cash, and any financial advisor will tell you, cash not only doesn’t earn a return; it actually depreciates over time thanks to inflation. The stock market, on the other hand, has returned an average of 9.5 percent for the past ninety years, even including the horrific downturn in 2007. The good news is a lot of companies are trying to figure out how to change that. Partly because it’s the right thing to do, partly because it’s good business.
One female VP in the investment banking division of a European bank, said that as male colleagues start families, they feel comfortable leveraging their new status to take additional time off, leaving her more overworked than before. "I'm being asked to cover for male bankers who are telling me they can't take on projects because of their families. I would like a family too, but the stress and overwork from compensating for colleagues' family time is killing my hormones."
i am not too sure what red flags really mean here, but glad to see your mention of "vast majority", which means that there are still some fields out there that are more men dominant and that loops back to my original question. i did not, mind you, say, it is men dominant or both sexes being equal in IB. I simply asked the question to get some feedbacks.
Formally known as Billguard, this financial planning app not only helps you create a budget, but they have a swipe-left, swipe-right feature where users can verify which of their expenses are theirs and which aren’t. Their specialty? Protecting their users from identity theft (more on this later). Features also includes helping users track their credit score. They also have Credit Card Optimizer feature, where users can track all of their credit card info, and helps users make better financial decisions with their credit cards. They also have a blog to keep you informed on all Prosper Daily’s updates along with useful financial tips.

MS. SPELLINGS: Well, it was a super fun partnership that was a partnership between President Clinton, President Bush, President H.W. Bush, his center, and the LBJ Library in Austin. So, in that Arkansas/Texas region we have four Presidential, Presidential Libraries. And the idea was to help develop mid-career, civically-engaged leaders, using those four presidencies as case studies in leadership around decision making, around vision and planning, around building coalitions and whatnot, and you all ought to get on the website because it looks like there's some presidential leadership scholar candidates in here. President Bush and President Clinton stewarded this. We were able to raise funds to underwrite this because we need to develop leaders in this space so they can have the skills necessary, particularly in that mid-30s to, you know, mid-50s where you're out of graduate school if you've gone, but there, and you've got plenty of runway. So, how do you become, how do you lead at that level? Who better to do that than two presidents?
MS. TURLINGTON BURNS: Well, the causes of death are the same. Post-partum hemorrhage is the leading cause, but—and you have sepsis, and different infections that might arise. You have hypertensive disorders, which you might see here in a different way than in other countries. We have a rising sort of chronic disease problem here in the United States, and so obesity, diabetes, those are our conditions that certainly impact the health and wellbeing of mom and her birth, and the child's birth as well. I think you would think that in our country where we spend more on healthcare than any other industrialized country per capita that we would have not the same lack of care, that access wouldn't be the problem and yet—
October 14, 2018, JAKARTA –  An important editorial on widening women’s access to financial services by Taimur Baig, Chief Economist of DBS Bank and member of Women’s World Banking’s Southeast Advisory Council, has been published in a special IMF edition of The Jakarta Post. The 2016 Financial Inclusion Survey, carried out by the Financial Service […]
Remember that there are many different definitions of "retirement." You don't have to attain some preconceived ideal. To reference our survey again, though the largest percentage of our respondents said they planned on a traditional retirement (i.e., leaving the workforce entirely between ages 65 and 70), a significant portion also reported making the forced or unforced choice to put off retirement or transition to a second career.6
I shared this experience with other female colleagues in the office, who agreed that it was totally inappropriate and assured me I’d have their full support if I wanted to report this incident to my manager. My manager (who is a male) was also extremely supportive, reaffirming that this is not the kind of behavior we’d want to espouse with future managers and leaders of the firm. He escalated the situation to HR, who has noted this on this employee’s record. While I’m not sure if any further steps will be taken, I’m glad there was an open communication channel between me and my manager where my opinion was respected and handled with sensitivity. 

If you’re looking for a way to automate your own investment strategy or want to start investing on a small-scale without using a broker or firm, an investment app might be the right platform for you. If you type in “investment apps” in the app store search tool, hundreds of options will pull up, but not all will help you grow your savings to hit a solid return.

First, you need to have a dream; second an idea of what your goal is and third, passion. Obviously having the skill set and working hard are important, but if you don’t have a dream and a goal, then don’t be surprised when you don’t get there. And if you don’t fill your dream with passion, then you can become disheartened about your career choice during the tough times. And there are always tough times in a cyclical business like finance.
The lack of confidence carries a big cost. For instance, more young women than young men defer retirement planning in their 20s, according to the Employee Benefits Research Institute. They take Social Security early, cutting their lifetime benefits. And financial advisors have long noted that wives often defer to their husbands, even though research shows that generally speaking, women are better investors than men.
Navigating a path to financial security is easier and more rewarding when it’s mapped out. Being prepared is the easy answer, whether married or single, we will encourage you to assert your vision and values about money and investing. We will help you create a safe money strategy through an ongoing series for women of wealth that is designed to engage and build confidence for all our female clients.
SHE doesn’t over-allocate its stocks in any one industry and is similar to a broad market fund, according to analysts, which is important for anyone who wants to diversify. SHE had a year to date return of 18.43% as of December 8, 2017. By comparison, Workplace Equality ETF (EQLT), a fund that holds the stocks of companies that support workplace equality of LGBT employees, had a return of 19.23% over the same time period.**

Before I started my job, I was more concerned about whether I would find my place here given the image of investment banking in the media over the past few years. But when I joined J.P. Morgan I was surprised by how nice everyone was. The people I work with are really friendly, normal and chilled out, and this is true from the other graduate analysts right through to high-level managing directors who are always willing to take the time to explain things and answer questions. We organise events for analysts and also have lots of networking activities, so it's a very inclusive environment.
MS. NELSON: Can we go a little deeper into the UN and partnerships? Obviously, the UN can't achieve its goals without partnership because that's the reason it was set up. Talk a little bit more about practically, where have you seen partnerships really work? With UN women, at the UN? You know, and has partnerships being highlighted as part of the sustainable development goals helped raise awareness that yeah not one sector can do it alone?
As an alternative, open a savings account with a high annual percentage yield (APY), which means you’ll earn interest based on how much you deposit into your savings account. According to Bankrate.com, a good APY is between 3 and 5 percent. Make sure when that your direct deposit hits, you’re automating your payments into your savings account that way you won’t forget. However, make sure it is not easily accessible to make withdrawals from your savings. If you feel you don’t have the self-control to not withdraw from your savings, here’s a few reasons why you should keep your checking and savings account at different banks, according to LearnVest.

Women entrepreneurs continue to face significant disadvantages in business despite studies showing that their companies actually outperform all-male companies by 63%. Incredibly, female business owners receive only 3% of venture capital investments, significantly limiting the growth of their companies. Female founders of color receive a mere fraction of that amount. We at FUND Conference are determined to help change this.
MS. CALABRESE BAIN: So, I can talk about a few of the ways that Bank of America has made some progress on this front because I think that there's always more that we can do around education. So, you know, we have a partnership with the National Association of Women Business Owners in 60 cities across the U.S. where we partner Bank of America/Merrill Lynch women chapter leaders in these local cities to really bring thought leadership, to bring education, sometimes to bring financing. But it is our way of understanding what is it that makes women business owners tick? So that how can we be more supportive? So, you saw a couple of things earlier on the screen. We've got a partnership with the Tory Burch Foundation Capital Program, which we started in 2014. We've been able to finance over 1,100 women, small business owners, and commit $25 million worth of capital, and we hope to see that program grow. We also work with our Community Development Financial Institutions. It's always a mouthful, but for those who are not familiar they really provide technical assistance and affordable loans across the U.S., and Bank of America is the largest investor of CDFIs. So, we're really thrilled with our participation with 240 lenders across the United States. So, thank you for all of the support and the partnership. Lastly speaking about one more program, through Andrea's support in supplier diversity and development, again this is another program where we can work directly with women and diverse owned businesses, and in 2016 actually invested over $2.6 billion in procurement spending.
MS. TURLINGTON BURNS: Sure. So, I have a thirteen-and-a-half-year-old daughter, and that was the baby that you saw in the video. When I delivered her, actually after I delivered her, I experienced a post-partum hemorrhage. I had a perfectly healthy pregnancy, and there was absolutely no indication during my pregnancy that I would have a complication like that. But luckily, I was in a birthing center within a hospital in New York City, and a team of providers that worked seamlessly together to make sure that my complication was managed and I was fine, and my daughter was fine. However, in the weeks after this experience I learned that globally in 2003, the global estimates for a pregnancy and childbirth-related complications and deaths were beyond half-a-million. And that just really struck me, like, "Why do I not know this? I can't believe I went into this experience not knowing this." And I felt like I had to learn more about why this was happening. And I learned that most of these deaths are preventable. Which beg the question, "Well why if we know how to save these lives, are we allowing these lives to be lost?" Which continues to be a goal in uncovering, you know, in many, many countries, including this one, why are we allowing women to die when we know how to make sure that they don't?
Women need to master the art of investing, in order to stay financially independent and also to ensure that their goals are always in line with the family’s goals. So, is there an age where women should start looking at investments? Actually, there is no particular age to start saving and investing. The earlier you start the better it is. This holds true whether or not you’re a woman.
A raft of surveys indicate that women do more research, are better at matching their investments to their goals, trade less and remain calmer during market upheavals. If you’re unsettled by this year’s stock market swoon, you may be interested to know that, on average, the portfolios of female investors hold up better than those of their male counterparts during a downturn. An analysis of the 60,000 users of Openfolio, an online investment-sharing platform, found that in 2014, a stellar year for the markets, the women investors it tracks outpaced their male peers by an average of 0.4 percentage point. In 2015, a poor year for markets, women lost an average of 2.5%, compared with a loss of 3.8% for men. In both years, women on average achieved their results with smaller swings than men had, adding luster to their already impressive achievements.

11. Statistics Canada, “Occupation - National Occupational Classification (NOC) 2016 (693A), Highest Certificate, Diploma or Degree (15), Labour Force Status (3), Age (13A) and Sex (3) for the Labour Force Aged 15 Years and Over in Private Households of Canada, Provinces and Territories, Census Metropolitan Areas and Census Agglomerations, 2016 Census - 25% Sample Data,” 2016 Census (2017).
This material contains the opinions of the manager and such opinions are subject to change without notice. This material has been distributed for informational purposes only and should not be considered as investment advice or a recommendation of any particular security, strategy or investment product. Information contained herein has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable, but not guaranteed. No part of this material may be reproduced in any form, or referred to in any other publication, without express written permission. PIMCO is a trademark of Allianz Asset Management of America L.P. in the United States and throughout the world. ©2018, PIMCO.
Ellevest’s “What The Elle” Newsletter. The Ellevest site as a whole is my favorite resource for women-specific investment research and advice. They have content about the gender pay gap, how to invest responsibly, how to negotiate for a raise, and every financial topic in between. Their co-founder and CEO Sallie Krawcheck has a monthly newsletter called “What The Elle” that gives insights into everyday investing and financial advice for women.
Our New Year’s resolutions can vary across an endless array of categories—from finding love, making new friends, and moving to a new city to acquiring a new hobby or skill set. Among the most popular resolutions that people make involve job- and career-related goals. However, while making a New Year’s resolution for career change and success can be the beginning of a wonderful new chapter in our lives, it’s really just the first step.
“TFS Scholarships was inspired by my own father’s experience as an inner-city high school principal, and grew out of the realization that more could be done to support students searching for college scholarships,” said Richard Sorensen, president of TFS Scholarships. “For more than 30 years, TFS has helped students achieve their higher education aspirations by making it easier to find essential funding for college.”
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