Then I had a second child about two years later and I would say after I delivered him, that's when I started to really think about what could I do and how could I do it. I was able to visit, while pregnant with my son, I visited Central America, which is where my mother is from, with CARE, the non-governmental organization. And in all of the visits that we did during the time that I was down there with them we came across One Water Program. It was a clean water project, and a lot of women were coming to get access to clean water, and getting like a little bit of ante-natal care or a little post-natal care while they were there. And because I was pregnant and because so many of the women were pregnant or had small children on their backs that's where I had the "Ah-ha!" moment of had I had my daughter in this community, far away from a hospital or, you know, paved roads, or clean water and sanitation, or you know, there were so many factors that I could see how it could have played out very differently had I been there or anywhere else for that matter.
Those are the questions we sought to answer through a survey conducted by CNBC and LinkedIn. This look at challenges facing women on Wall Street is the first in a series of surveys aimed at highlighting some of the big issues facing women in the workplace. We polled over 1,000 men and women who work across the financial services industry in banking, capital markets, financial services, investment banking and investment management in the U.S. The survey was conducted between April 18 and 27. Participants were invited on a random basis and self-reported gender.
Before she invests in a stock, Persaud asks a series of questions: Is the company well established, and does it have clear competitive advantages? Is it profitable and capable of generating enough cash to pay a healthy dividend? Can you buy the shares for a reasonable price? Affirmative answers to all of those questions are likely to result in investments that provide competitive returns with a minimum of volatility.
In recent weeks, Knowledge@Wharton High School began noticing young women on the Wharton campus in Philadelphia, Pa., U.S., who were wearing hats and carrying bags inscribed with three simple words: Girls Who Invest. Since we happen to know lots of girls with this interest – thousands from around the world have participated in our annual KWHS Investment Competition for high school students – we decided to look further into this intriguing GWI sorority. Who were they? Why were they here? And were they truly stock market devotees?
As a female Baby Boomer, I'll admit that this realization was a little scary. We all see the statistics on the number of Baby Boomers retiring every day – shouldn't I be ready to join that movement any day now? But I quickly discovered I was not alone in my fears. Talking with my close friends, I was amazed to find that many of us were in the same boat. Of course, when you consider the many unique challenges women face in retirement planning, it's not surprising that my female friends shared my same fears and difficulties.
Nearly two-thirds of women polled say females are less likely than males to reach leadership roles. Only 56 percent of men and 37 percent of women agree that males and females are equally likely to become leaders in their industry. What's holding women back? Almost no one says the biggest obstacle is women opting out of leadership positions. Rather, it comes down to how quickly employees are promoted. Fewer than half of women (47 percent) felt that “men and women are promoted at an equal rate at their companies," and 26 percent of men also identified this gap.
MS. MELANNE VERVEER: Well, good afternoon everybody. It's a real personal pleasure for me to be here today. I can't tell you how inspired I was listening to Christy, and if she has proven anything it's that one person can make a difference. So, I think that's the lesson to take out of that. And thank you to Bank of America for all that you do in making not just this possible but so much more.
At the outset, The Man and Woman has wide difference in structure of their Brain, so their thinking line differs. The Man has two hemisphers and the nerves are concentrated in the hemisphere itself, interconnecting nerve between two is less. On the other hand , in case of Woman has interconnected nerves between the two hemishere are more, virtually it is one brain, and concentrate better, but only in one matter at a time. The Man can think more diverse at a given time.
Things will only change if senior male bankers start promoting women on the basis of their competency, said senior female banker on Wall Street. "Women lose the will to fight against the tide and get tired of putting in the hours and sacrificing family time." But women also need to ask for what they deserve: "I believe I am paid equal to men in the past few roles I have had, but that is because I have been proactive in finding out how much my peers make, and demanded that I be paid the same, if not more," she concluded.
No. In your early 20s, you’re just happy to have a job. I loved the markets and the trading floor atmosphere. As you get more senior, the pay disparity, the accounts being unequally distributed becomes more apparent. It bothered me. The little frat boy jokes stuff was a constant drumbeat. It didn’t get to me that much. As I got into my 30s, I was bothered more by seeing young women come who were talented and leave because of the environment.
Top GWI Takeaway: “In investment banking, they’re always making DCF models. I’ve always wondered, ‘What does this stand for? What are they doing?’ While we were here we worked in Excel and found out about DCF. DCF stands for Discounted Cash Flow [and is a valuation method used to evaluate the attractiveness of an investment opportunity.] I saw [company] income statement, balance sheet, working capital, cash flows; these are all different sheets within Excel that you bring together to create the DCF. I also saw how it intertwined with finding the value of a company, because you have to account for inflation and how much a company would be worth in five years.”
MS. TURLINGTON BURNS: It's a huge problem, and it's going to get worse. We have done a series of films called "Giving Birth in America" where we look through state-by-state at maternal healthcare. And one of the first films that we did was in Montana and there, you know, we had a family, a Caucasian family, highly educated, lots of kids, but that lived far away, just lived in a large state in a rural part of the state, and so when an emergency happened they were far away. I mean the woman survived, but it was, it was almost as if you could be in Sub-Saharan Africa and have the same problem. If you have a post-partum hemorrhage, you could bleed to death in under two hours if you don't get to care. So, you can see some of the same challenges as you do anywhere. I think what's most important is really having many levels of trained health providers, so community health workers, doulas, midwives, nurses, and doctors when necessary. Sometimes in the United States we have a tendency to over-medicalize birth, and so you might rush to a doctor who you don't necessarily need to see.
Anyone who wishes to invest in firms that benefit women who are not employees will quickly find that there is as yet no systematic way to measure broader “gender impact”. Even inside firms, data are lacking. “We need to move beyond just counting women and start taking into account culture,” says Barbara Krumsiek of Arabesque, an asset manager that uses data on “ESG”: environmental, social and governance issues. It is urging firms to provide more gender-related data, such as on attrition rates and pay gaps. Just as its “S-Ray” algorithm meant it dropped Volkswagen because the carmaker scored poorly on corporate governance well before its value was hit by the revelation that it was cheating on emissions tests, in future it hopes information about problems such as sexual harassment could help it spot firms with a “toxic” management culture before a scandal hits the share price.

Here, we have a ways to go. Maybe you’ve heard of the gender pay gap. Frustrating, right? And costly. But there are more gaps at play: Women pay more for the debt they carry than men, and they don’t invest as much as men do. As a result, women retire with two-thirds the money of men…even though we tend to live years longer. Don’t believe me? Check the gender mix at your local nursing home: 80% of women die single, and they’re also 80% more likely to be impoverished in retirement than men. Yuck.
When users sign up for Stash, they’re asked whether they identify as low, medium, or high risk when it comes to investing their money. Among the sample group, nearly 90% of female Stash users identified a low or medium risk tolerance when they opened their account, as compared to 75% of men. “This means that female Stash users perceive themselves as less willing to make riskier investments, opting for less volatile stocks and ETFs—they want safer investments, in other words,” Alexandra Phelan, the Stash data scientist who led this study, tells Quartz.

Americans as a whole are drastically under-saved for retirement. According to a recent report by the Economic Policy Institute, nearly half of all families have no retirement-account savings at all.1 Women are disproportionately impacted by this shortfall for a number of reasons. Consider the socioeconomic factors that are creating obstacles for women in America today:

In the survey, 79 percent of Hispanic and African American respondents said it is in the best interest of the firms to focus on hiring minority advisors to better reflect their overall client base and the population at large. Seventy-three percent of Hispanics and 79 percent of African Americans believe it’s in the best interest of clients to have a more diverse advisor force.
MS. SPELLINGS: Well, in Charlotte you can't say that too much because we have people like Andrea Smith who are leading the Chamber of Commerce, and of course a woman that is the mayor, and the superintendent here is a woman, and one of my board of governors' members I think is here, Anna Nelson, and on and on and on, Ophelia Garmon-Brown who has been so instrumental in the economic mobility work here. But that notwithstanding, there are gaps and, you know, when you, and when you're in a place like Washington there is such a public service mentality and so many opportunities for women, we'll get into some of that, but I am puzzled by that, particularly when most, I mean women are going to college and getting out of college at rates that far exceed, and we need to work on our men obviously, but that exceed women. So, what happens between the time that we're getting out of college, attaining at high levels, and being in those leadership roles? We get lost. Right? Which is why programs like this are so important.  

Bostic also serves as a board member of Freddie Mac, the Lincoln Institute of Land Policy and Abode Communities. He is a fellow of the National Association of Public Administration, vice president of the Association of Public Policy and Management, a member of the board of trustees of Enterprise Community Partners, and a research advisory board member of the Reinvestment Fund.

MS. NELSON: So, Oulimata, I know that you are a Global Ambassador in this program, but you've also participated as a mentor for another program supported by Bank of America, the Cherie Blair Foundation's work with mentoring, particularly online mentoring. Can you talk a little bit about your experiences with both of those programs, first with the Cherie Blair Foundation?
Olivia Ott talked about how her perception of the industry does not match the reality. Her expression has two points of view. First, she hates the desire to pursue only money or only to be rich. She thinks it is particularly annoying. I have seen a movie, the Wolf of Wall Street, the whole film pinpoints the importance of money. I’m not sure whether this is the belief of the whole financial market. I’m still in doubt if people who hold other values than money will have to change themselves to fit into the atmosphere. Secondly, Olivia thinks that her peers in Princeton have already made a step ahead of her, and she hasn’t started yet. So she felt the pressure. I feel the same way as she did in my school life, but her experience is inspiring. From her point of view, not every company was making money just for money, and not everyone was born in the finance industry. These two understandings are meaningful for many women who want to dig into this field but fear to do so. Although the finance world has been influenced by those very extreme and monetary supremacy, it is not the whole finance world. Rather, it still has some bright sides. For instance, people can make contributions, such as ESG’s 3 social good orientation investments through money.
Whether your funds come from family, student loans, scholarships or your own wallet, you’ll need to budget for expenses like textbooks, housing and, yes, a social life. Knowing who’s footing the bill, what costs to expect and which ones you can live without — ideally before school starts — can reduce stress and help you form healthy financial habits for the future.
As  banks' claims to diversity are blown apart by the figures emerging from the UK's gender pay gap reporting requirements, how does it feel to be a woman in finance? Do you buy the Goldman story that men and women are paid equally for equal work and it's just a question of getting more women into senior slots, or do you get angry and point to more insidious issues?
I come from a completely non-traditional background when I was applying but ended up getting in the industry anyways. After you get in, at the junior level, hard work, have a good attitude/personality, motivation, adaptable and being smart at work (like let other ppl know you did the work..) will get you ahead, not if you are a girl or boy or loud mouth or not.
Wells Fargo Advisors is registered with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission and the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority but is not licensed or registered with any financial services regulatory authority outside of the U.S. Non-U.S. residents who maintain U.S.-based financial services accounts with Wells Fargo Advisors may not be afforded certain protections conferred by legislation and regulations in their country of residence in respect to any investments, investment transactions, or communications made with Wells Fargo Advisors.
A number of members have approached us about how they could become more involved with WIN.  There are many ways to become involved including volunteering for a WIN Committee.  We are actively seeking volunteers for the Membership Sponsorship Committee.  Volunteering for a Committee is a great way to expand your professional profile and personal branding in the investment community. We encourage anyone who is interested in volunteering for a Committee to contact the WIN Administrator at ([email protected]) for more information.
“The Reserve Banks are vital contributors to our nation’s economic and financial success. I’m excited about the opportunity to work with the Bank’s well-respected staff in advancing the excellent reputation this organization has built over many years,” Bostic said. “In my role as president of the Atlanta Reserve Bank, I also look forward to confronting the challenges the Federal Reserve faces in today’s increasingly global and rapidly changing economy.”
MS. SPELLINGS: You know, I would certainly not want to say something un-PC about men, but my observation is that I think we are. I think that's why you see women show up to say, "Put me in coach," or "I'm going to lead an effort on maternal health. I'm going to run for the school board, I'm going to be the president of a university, or the mayor of Charlotte," or whatever it is. And I do think we're motivated by that, often at some sacrifice.
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That’s why I went to London. I did a Masters in finance for a year because I wanted to switch to something that was more in the private sector. Back then I thought I wanted to do consulting. They called it Litigation Consulting. There’s a lot of data analysis so it was very similar to what I did before in research but it’s still the private sector.
All of the top banks are run by men. A Catalyst study reports that women account for less than 17 percent of senior leaders in investment banking. In private equity, women comprise only 9 percent of senior executives and only 18 percent of total employees, according to a 2017 report by Preqin. At hedge funds and private debt firms, the numbers are similarly low — women hold just 11 percent of leadership roles.
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So, if you’re eager to make a major job or career change… you guessed it, make a plan. Consider making a list of pros and cons for taking the plunge. If everything in your life is pointing to making a major change, figure out what new goal makes the most sense for you. Take an inventory of your skills and experience, along with your interests and aspirations, and figure out which careers/industries you best align with. Do you have any friends or family who have jobs that sound potentially intriguing to you? If so, ask them more about it. Do your research—the Internet is a great source of information for researching new companies and careers. 

Less than half of female respondents (46 percent) said they were socking away 6 percent or more of their salaries, which means more than half are not taking advantage of the full employer-matching contribution. In general, employers match up to 6 percent of worker wages in 401(k) plans. In contrast, nearly six out of 10 Millennial males (57 percent) saved 6 percent or more of their pay in these tax-sheltered retirement accounts, the survey found.
VP Nancy Wilson worked in a variety of marketing and business development roles in the I.T. and telecom industries before joining the business development team at Allegiance Capital. Her life as an Air Force brat, in a family where she was the only girl with four brothers, helped shape her “extroverted, super-high-energy personality. I jump in feet first a lot.”
Figuring out how much you should invest vs. set aside in a short-term savings account comes down to how much risk you’re willing to undertake. Year over year, the market has been steadily rising, but that doesn’t mean that a return is guaranteed. The golden rule is to never invest more than you’re willing to lose, especially if you’re going after aggressive or volatile markets.
Communicate. If you have questions, your friends and family probably do too. Not only is it time for money to stop being a taboo conversation topic, but ensuring you're on the same page with your loved ones about financial goals and responsibilities can be critical. Fidelity has numerous resources to help have these conversations with parents, partners and kids.
How would you deal with a situation where a bank expressed interest in you but made it clear that they did not want you to be networking with other banks or anyone else for that matter, for the sake of “not wanting to make an offer that might get turned down” – If you want to join the firm, tell them they are your first choice and if they make such request you would like to know when they’d be giving you this offer. ;)
In the survey, 79 percent of Hispanic and African American respondents said it is in the best interest of the firms to focus on hiring minority advisors to better reflect their overall client base and the population at large. Seventy-three percent of Hispanics and 79 percent of African Americans believe it’s in the best interest of clients to have a more diverse advisor force.
MS. TURLINGTON BURNS: You're further ahead than I was. I ran my first marathon in 2011 and we were given ten spots for a very new charitable organization as part of the New York City Marathon. And I thought, "Well, I know some runners, and I can't not run it as the head of this organization." So, I signed up, and immediately when I started training I saw the connection between what we're trying to do, where there is need, and where there is really an intense barrier, which is distance, and how we can connect the dots there. So, I ran the first one and then I thought, "Oh yeah, I have two kids. I think I could do that two times." And then it just started to grow, and it's turned out that there are a lot of runners out there, or people who are just—I think people who are taking care of themselves and are active, healthy people, are more likely to care about the health and wellbeing of others, than your average person. So, we found that it's been a very connective, very community-building type of event, and people go couch to marathon, or they walk, cycle, you know, anything that you do already there's a way that you can contribute that effort towards other people.
MS. VERVEER: But she's really brought extraordinary leadership, certainly to the United States Cabinet as the Secretary of Education, to now be here in North Carolina running the university system in terms of what this state represents in the full-flowering of the university system, which is well-known. But also, the work you've done with President George Bush both in terms of policy work, political work, etc. So, by any definition Margaret is a leader, and that's what we're going to discuss—leadership. And I think today more than ever women are in a pivotal position. Just look at all of you, the kinds of positions we probably wouldn't have been in ten years ago. The difference we can make, the data that shows that we're growing economies, it's critical. Driving social progress. Why is it so crucial in your eyes that we push this forward as best as we can?
You’ve heard the stats that there are more CEOs named John in the U.S. than there are women CEOs? You don’t want to fall behind the Johns where you work, and that’s what will happen if your company isn’t willing to invest in you. Fortunately, you’re now armed with lots of bragging points and a great sense of the market value of what you do, which will help you seek out the next great opportunity and negotiate your new offers like a pro.
To keep from acting impulsively, Kaplan suggests writing a script that outlines how you will react to a plunge or a rapidly rising market. Following that plan—-be it reading from an investment policy statement that you’ve prepared for yourself or simply calling your adviser—-should help you in both booms and busts, tempering the inclination to invest the rent money in stocks during run-ups and to bail out of the market with money you might not need for 30 years.
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