Move over millennials, here comes the IGen! Born between 1995 and 2005 this group of tech savvy natives is the next cohort and are just now entering the workforce. IGen, or Gen Z as they are often referred, have grown up in a world of social media where Youtube, Instagram, and Twitter reign supreme. These kids are a force to be reckoned with and require access to information in ways that are familiar, immediate, and actionable. Our success depends on them because as the IGen goes, so goes the manufacturing industry, the nation, and the world.
When users sign up for Stash, they’re asked whether they identify as low, medium, or high risk when it comes to investing their money. Among the sample group, nearly 90% of female Stash users identified a low or medium risk tolerance when they opened their account, as compared to 75% of men. “This means that female Stash users perceive themselves as less willing to make riskier investments, opting for less volatile stocks and ETFs—they want safer investments, in other words,” Alexandra Phelan, the Stash data scientist who led this study, tells Quartz.

It can be a very hard line to walk, and you're constantly searching for balance in literally every aspect of your personality (be fun, but don't be TOO fun; don't get easily offended, but don't internalize the shit that really does upset you; be assertive and don't let people talk over you or dismiss your ideas, but don't come off as bitch so make sure you modify everything you say by making it seem like a question or a suggestion, etc etc etc). It's not so bad at the junior levels, but I think you can definitely see and feel it more as you get older.
2. "Do I look like a handout? I am independent woman and I expect men to pay for dates and I also want someone who can take care of me, if I choose to be a full-time housewife." This is one of the most common lines that I have heard. I am always confused what does this actually mean. Do you want to be a full time housewife or not? How can you claim to be independent while expecting men to pay? No, I am not kidding.
The WII Summit seeks to bring together HBS alumni, industry professionals, and current MBAs for a day of open discussion about the current topics affecting the buy-side community. It is an unparalleled opportunity to meet and network with industry peers and senior women in an open forum and exchange perspectives on how to drive a successful career in investing.

MS. SMITH: No, thank you. And thank you to this panel, thank you to all of you. Thank you to all of our panelists and our amazing speakers. I'm inspired. I'm inspired by everyone, and I wrote down a few things. I mean hammocks, the 5,000 Lowe's hammocks, or the bank in Ethiopia, the small loan is 1.8 million. I mean I think we've got some things we can learn here. I mean the dinner kit to the, sold already and now online catering. I mean the stories are amazing. So, Alyse, thank you for the partnership for the last five years, and thank you to all of our mentees and mentors for being here. we're so excited to be able to do the program in the United States, in our corporate headquarters, which is fantastic. And as Margaret reminded me I'm the only thing standing between all of you and the reception. So, my last comment though is please come to the reception because our mentees will have wears from their businesses, and they'll be able to talk to you about all of the things that they're doing. So--


According to Veris Wealth Partners and Catalyst At Large, investment-advice firms, by last June $910m was invested with a gender-lens mandate across 22 publicly traded products, up from $100m and eight products in 2014. Private markets are hard to track, but according to Project Sage, which scans private-equity, venture and debt funds, $1.3bn had been raised by mid-2017 for investing with a gender lens.
October 14, 2018, JAKARTA –  An important editorial on widening women’s access to financial services by Taimur Baig, Chief Economist of DBS Bank and member of Women’s World Banking’s Southeast Advisory Council, has been published in a special IMF edition of The Jakarta Post. The 2016 Financial Inclusion Survey, carried out by the Financial Service […]

In fact, looking at actual data is one of the best ways to counteract the fear of investing. For example, are you afraid to invest in stocks because you remember the painful declines of the financial crisis? Well, in spite of the 36.55 percent plunge in the S&P 500 stock market index in 2008, this index gained an average of 7.25 percent annually between 2006 and 2015.


Top GWI Takeaway: “In investment banking, they’re always making DCF models. I’ve always wondered, ‘What does this stand for? What are they doing?’ While we were here we worked in Excel and found out about DCF. DCF stands for Discounted Cash Flow [and is a valuation method used to evaluate the attractiveness of an investment opportunity.] I saw [company] income statement, balance sheet, working capital, cash flows; these are all different sheets within Excel that you bring together to create the DCF. I also saw how it intertwined with finding the value of a company, because you have to account for inflation and how much a company would be worth in five years.”
Imagine how much easier it would be to manage your finances if change were not an ever-present dynamic. Of course, change is a fact of life – and life would be pretty boring without it! But change can certainly make long-term financial management difficult. Without insight into the future and what might transpire, planning presents plenty of challenges.
Money Motivation: “I had always thought about finance before this program with not such a positive lens. There are a lot of people who are focused on the money. That was one reason why I was intimidated by getting into finance to begin with. A lot of times those people can be very loud and overwhelming. It can give a negative perception of the industry. The people at Princeton pursuing finance are very intense. I was meeting kids who had been on a finance track for years and I wasn’t. I now realize that was a very skewed perspective of the industry. A lot of the asset managers and portfolio managers that we’ve met in this program came from a liberal arts background.”
And I'm thrilled to be joined by some of our past mentees and current mentors for a discussion really about the power of partnership. You know, I think that there's something really profound going on in our world today, and I think that if you look around the world, and it was echoed in all these discussions that we just had, that women are really reaching the highest levels of leadership. And I think they're getting there and they're realizing that, you know, they came a lot further than they anticipated. They have a lot more power, they have a lot more reach than they ever thought would be possible for them in their lives. And the first thing they think is, "How am I going to give back? How am I going to pay this opportunity forward? Engage more people?" And they don't just want to write a check, they really want to give of their time and their resources. They want to open up their networks.

3. Create an investment plan. Once you have set your goals, you need to create a solid investment plan. First, determine how much money you have to invest, and start thinking about how to make your money work for you to achieve your financial goals. Rather than a set of rules, an investment plan provides guidelines that can help you organize and direct your energies. Financial plans should have continuity and a solid foundation, but at the same time be adaptable to changes that invariably happen in life. For more on financial planning, read Developing a Personal Financial Plan.
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For example, take the key values that underpin success at MUFG. Vanessa shed light on them: ‘They are partnership and accountability (working in a team and taking responsibility for your contribution both as an individual and as part of the group), innovation (coming up with and implementing new ideas), integrity (how would you behave if it was your grandmother?), and urgency (taking action in a timely manner).’
It is definitely doable. I am acquainted with one female at Barclays(some of you might know who I'm talking about) who has managed to wield a massive amount of influence over the company as an associate to where she is more or less a gatekeeper for MBA recruiting. She's very direct, very professional, and very people smart...and she didn't get to where she is by trying to by imitating someone else. She crafted and managed her own unique brand.

It’s incredibly beneficial to your career to broaden your network outside your immediate team. If you build relationships with colleagues in other teams or divisions, it’ll give you a support network you can turn to for career advice. I think that having a good network can also help you do your job better, because you are better connected to the wider business.
There’s also a concept I think you should be familiar with. It’s called passive investing. The idea is that it’s smarter to invest across the entire market and then not pay attention to it, than it is to pick stocks or pay someone else to pick stocks. It’s easier and less expensive, and historically it’s been more successful. In fact, Warren Buffett made a $1 million wager that passive investing would beat hedge funds—and he was right. It’s why he advises his heirs to invest passively with their money.
Our culture emphasizes teamwork and collaboration. My coworkers are great—really smart, driven, hard workers with whom I’ve developed several friendships (key to surviving those super late nights) and what I expect will be life-long relationships. Many of the senior folks on our floor also make a great effort to get to know their teams and serve as mentors.
My days are pretty unpredictable—unless I’ve got early morning calls or meetings or a ton of work to do urgently, I’ll usually get into work around 10am and could leave anywhere between 8pm to past midnight. There have been several times where I’ve woken up to tons of emails that need to be addressed immediately, so I’ll log in from home and keep working until I get to a stopping point where I can transition to the office. Best parts of my day are when the client acknowledges how helpful our work has been. Worst parts would be the really late nights and days when you’re just stretched way too thin across multiple teams.
The reluctance to invest outside of company plans may be related to women’s lack of confidence in their investing abilities, which can make them prone to procrastination. “Women hold back because they think they need to know everything before they invest,” says Alexandra Lebenthal, chief executive of Lebenthal & Co., a New York City money-management company. Krawcheck agrees, saying that wanting to know more before getting started can be a trap. “There’s always a desire to know more. But if you wait, it just gets harder,” she says.

In some cases, educated, independent, breadwinning women seem to have an aversion to the idea of being an investor. About five years ago the Washington, D.C.-based Women's Institute for a Secure Retirement was running a series of investment seminars to help a group of nurses prepare for retirement. The institute was interested in part for research purposes, because nurses would be highly educated and, presumably, interested in investing. 

Perhaps you’re just not feeling completely happy or fulfilled in your current industry, and something is telling you that perhaps now is the time to make a major change. This could be a good thing—the truth is, job unhappiness is often a major cause of mental and physical distress and could have a wide range of negative effects on our health and well-being.
Women are, however, very confident in other forms of financial wellness. Nearly all (90%) reported ease in activities like paying off bills and creating budgets (84%). While these financial maintenance activities are important, they don't prevent the two big interruptions that exacerbate the looming million dollar gap in wealth. The study found that temporary interruption in employment had a permanent impact on their income, with 21% reporting that they were payed less for the same work after returning to work. The other cost driver was healthcare. Another study from 2013 found that women are now paying $195,000 more, on average, for healthcare and extended care due to living longer than men.
Break the silence on money. " Our study found that 61% of women would rather discuss details of their own death over money topics ," Sabbia said. "This is impeding women’s financial empowerment and preventing them from taking needed action to build up wealth." Sabbia suggest that women with more advanced knowledge should encourage and lead open discussions with other women about financial and investing goals, concerns and fears.  Discussions could be in and outside of the workplace, by holding "investing 101" events or even more casual and intimate small group coffees or dinners. That sort of venue could help encourage women to share investing success stories, advice and actionable tips for getting started.

Our culture emphasizes teamwork and collaboration. My coworkers are great—really smart, driven, hard workers with whom I’ve developed several friendships (key to surviving those super late nights) and what I expect will be life-long relationships. Many of the senior folks on our floor also make a great effort to get to know their teams and serve as mentors.

Chelsea Middleton served 8 years as a crew chief on an Army Blackhawk helicopter before Allegiance hired her as a business development VP. She says she “had to grow up fast” and learned you “can’t allow yourself to feel intimidated” in the military. This experience, along with her self-discipline and strong motivation to succeed, come in handy when she talks with people about selling their businesses.
And the hot thing. First girls need to judge their "hot level" before they want try to leverage it. I've meet plenty of girls that think they're gorgeous because their friends tell them so. Girls will say other girls are attractive (in a straight way) by their personality, how "cute" they dress, how much weight they've lost, etc. Guys equate "hot'ness" to legs, tits, ass, & attractiveness of facial features (generally speaking). In all sincerity, if you haven't been known for those (the latter) things most of your life or haven't had a ton of the more desirable men in your social circles blowing you up all the time, then you probably won't have that type of power over the guys in your office. If those things do apply, just don't be a stone cold bitch, like the coupon cunt from from above, be nice, and you've got pretty good get out of jail card. IMO.
How would you deal with a situation where a bank expressed interest in you but made it clear that they did not want you to be networking with other banks or anyone else for that matter, for the sake of “not wanting to make an offer that might get turned down” – If you want to join the firm, tell them they are your first choice and if they make such request you would like to know when they’d be giving you this offer. ;)
MS. VERVEER: But I do think as we talk about leadership this is one of those spaces, and one where you can have tremendous impact at the local level, even when you're doing many other things. One of the things Kim and I noticed when we were writing Fast Forward was that women today tend to look at whatever they do, whether it's starting a business, they want a real purpose for that business, whether it's trying to address some kind of a local challenge, that there's this sense of purpose. I really want to make a difference. Are we peculiar that way?
Partly because of this dynamic, she said there's often a career premium for women who are young and beautiful. "You get a lot of beautiful young women in banking who find themselves replaced by a new generation as they get older. - I've seen older women being made to hand their accounts to 22 year-olds. They complain, but they were in that position once - they were the 22 year-old who took another woman's clients. Women don't help each other."
Define your goals: Get to the heart of what's important to you by thinking critically about investment goals. Sabbia mentioned preparing for personal retirement, saving for children's educational needs, or leaving a charitable gift for the next generation as potential goals. She also mentioned a key difference in how women invest. "While women care about performance, they also look for their investments to align with their values, goals and priorities," Sabbia said. "In fact, more than half of women investors are interested in or engaged in impact investing, generating financial returns along with social returns." Sabbia mentions that whether it's for your own family or a meaningful cause to help others, having clear goals that link to a clear strategy is key to success. And the ripple effect from that empowerment could extend far beyond your own backyard. Increased participation in investing could benefit communities overall. "If more women can actively take control of their financial future all along the way, it would not only benefit them, but also their families and our society overall,” said Maddy Dychtwald, co-founder and senior vice president of Age Wave.

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