As mentioned, this has been answered many times. From investment bankers I know, most of the media's portrayal is exaggerated. Yes hours are long and you have to be driven to win. But that doesn't mean you go around swearing and yelling in people's faces - usually IBankers do the opposite. You need to have a competitive drive and be a people's person. The industry has many females nowadays just like engineering. You are far from alone if you choose to do IB. If you are acquiescent and fear being a in a tough, competitive environment, then you shouldn't go into IB whether you are boy or girl. Stop assuming girls are somehow weaker than males and therefore are unfit in IB. There are guys and girls who do well and don't do well in IB.
MS. KATZIFF: So, to exactly that, the many, I would just add there is no one perfect mentor, so surround yourself with many people because you can pick and choose strengths. Everyone has different strengths. And so, think of it as you are the CEO of your business, of your career, and you get to select your Board of Directors, and that is how you should think about mentorship, where similar to any company who looks for a strong Board of Directors you pick multiple skills. You would never pick one person with one skill. So, diversify and have mentors that you tap into and rely on, depending on the situation, and you get diversity of thought.
Although making a big career change can be a wonderful moment in your life, acting impulsively could really backfire. There are countless stories of people who made quick decisions to leave their current working worlds for new ones, only to discover that they were ill-informed and really had no idea what they were getting into and wound up being just as unhappy—or even unhappier—as they were before. Don’t become just another unfortunate member of this group. Plan wisely and carefully, and you’ll be setting yourself up for a real shot at positive and lasting change.
An increasing number of women are having children later in life, having spent their younger years establishing careers. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, in 2015, birth rates declined for women in their 20s but increased for women in their 30s and early 40s.4 I personally had my son in my 30s, which meant my husband and I had to save for his college and our own retirement simultaneously. For those of us who had children on the later side, how many of us really thought about saving for retirement early in our careers? Yet we were likely more able to afford to save before we had families to provide for.
In a sign of their higher risk aversion, 90 percent of female Millennials said they held cash assets, such as money market funds or certificates of deposit (CDs). While these savings vehicles guarantee you'll get your money back, the returns are slight. The average nationwide money market account yields just 0.18 percent, and a one-year CD pays 2.21 percent in interest, according to Bankrate.com. Those modest returns compare with a 4 percent gain for the broad stock market this year and a nearly 20 percent gain in 2017.
What I think that Cowell meant by the second part – that “getting to the result is harder” – is that the argument she poses is mostly true in theory; studies have indeed shown that diversity of hiring increases welfare, and specific to the asset management industry, portfolio returns. However, we have not seen enough industries and businesses having taken action towards this- which makes it hard to get to the “result”. Moreover, more diversity means more diverse opinions too, which might make it hard to reach decisions. This obstacle is natural, and its difficulty will depend on the temperaments of the people involved as well as the company’s culture.
Don’t give up if you get a no. Ask for non-money perks: flextime, a new title, pay reevaluation next quarter, or mentorship by or a project with a senior exec. They’re valuable in themselves, but they also get your boss in the habit of saying yes to you, and that will help you get that raise next time. Remember, this is a lifetime gap you’re working to close!
“The more women manage funds, the more funds get channeled into issues women care about,” says Nathalie Molina Niño, CEO of Brava Investments. “When someone brings on one female fund manager, we’re talking about potentially billions of dollars that get moved in a different direction.” She says that questions like “How many of your fund managers are women?” used to be rare in the industry, but now that more and more people are asking, large institutions are getting nervous—mostly because the answer is often “none” or “few.”
Fidelity Personal Investing does not give advice based on personal circumstances so you are responsible for deciding whether an investment is suitable for you. In doing so, please remember that past performance is not necessarily a guide to future performance, the performance of funds is not guaranteed and the value of your investments can go down as well as up, so you may get back less than you invest. When investments have particular tax features, these will depend on your personal circumstances and tax rules may change in the future. Before investing into a fund, please read the relevant key information document and ‘Doing Business with Fidelity’, a document that incorporates our Client Terms. If you are investing via the Fidelity SIPP you should also read the Fidelity SIPP Key Features Document incorporating the Fidelity SIPP Terms and Conditions. You should regularly review your investment objectives and choices and if you are unsure whether an investment is suitable for you, you should contact an authorised financial adviser.
Hi Diana! Well, it’s sad to know that so few girls come to participate of this incredible event. And a, even more sad thing is to notice that, actually, this few is a surprisingly “high” percentage… When you look upon girls percentage in STEAM, or at least in Scientific Olympiads, in my country, and I believe that in most countries too, it’s much smaller than 27%. There are those who say that it’s due to some kind of tendency of boys having more facility in this areas when compared to girls. Well, personally, I don’t believe in such a thing, principally because different kinds of intelligence (and ways of thinking and perceiving things) can be used to achieve success, even more if we’re talking about finances, an area that is very versatile. Other argument for this problem that I once heard was that girls have less time to study e put efforts in those things due the obligation that many of them have of taking care of the house. Again, I don’t think that this is the cause, at least not the big one. Of course it’s a problem, any kid should have the studies damaged due to any kind of work, even in home. But see, there are many girls who are top students in their class, this “lack of time” due to work now a days is not so comum, and some boys also have it because they need to help their fathers if some tasks on even in the job itself (I some times did it; two days ago I helped my father covering some merchandise to protect it from the rain). The real villain, I think, are the scar left by a past much more patriarchal than the actual society. A past in which girls were really considered as inferiors and suffered a hard discrimination. Unfortunately, there are people who keeps this archaic thinking, but it’s not the general society. And those scars made the representation os women in these areas be much smaller and now many girls look upon it and feel like if that did not fit them, and also it basically give birth to the wrong separation of “boy things” and “girl things”. Now, THIS is the real problem.
Conventional wisdom “blames” women for this gap. We receive messages that we’re not as good at math as men; we’re not as good at investing. Um, no. Studies have found that once women do invest, they outperform men by nearly one percentage point a year. This was confirmed recently by Fidelity, which analyzed the performance of 8 million retail clients in 2016. Typically women outperform because they don’t overtrade, panic in down markets, or pay too much in fees.

As we say in my country "you weren't crying when you were eating the meatballs". Why is she bringing it up now and not when it actually happened? Because it's a convenient time to come out of the woodwork and get some publicity and possibly financial rewards. Welcome to the pussification of the Western world. Being a professional victim is becoming more and more widespread.
Opinions represent WFII’s opinion and are for general informational purposes only and are not intended to predict or guarantee the future performance of any individual security, market sector or the markets generally. WFII does not undertake to advise you of any change in its opinions or the information contained on this website. Wells Fargo & Company affiliates may issue reports or have opinions that are inconsistent with, and reach different conclusions from, this report.

By contrast, wealth management was long in the shadows – and women quickly made inroads. After all, women frequently control the household purse strings in Asia. Strong ties between generations as well as reliable access to childcare have made it easier for Asia's women to re-enter the workforce after starting a family than for their U.S. and European counterparts.
October 14, 2018, JAKARTA –  An important editorial on widening women’s access to financial services by Taimur Baig, Chief Economist of DBS Bank and member of Women’s World Banking’s Southeast Advisory Council, has been published in a special IMF edition of The Jakarta Post. The 2016 Financial Inclusion Survey, carried out by the Financial Service […]
I'm a third-year analyst in Investment Grade Finance (IGF) in the UK Financial Institutions team and I'll soon be starting a one-year rotation in our New York office. In London I work in a small team of four people, and we're responsible for helping our clients - organisations in the financial services industry - raise money by accessing debt capital markets.
I write contracts that are a little bit more involved in terms of tax and accounting stuff but also it’s a contract that helps the company raise money with certain objectives. So if you borrow money from the bank for a mortgage your credit rating goes down, same with the company’s. I do something with bonds that make them have ‘equity like; features, it’s called a hybrid. Basically what I do is create very funky bonds. [Laughs] That’s what I say in my Instagram profile because no one understands. It’s bonds, but it’s very funky.
I shared this experience with other female colleagues in the office, who agreed that it was totally inappropriate and assured me I’d have their full support if I wanted to report this incident to my manager. My manager (who is a male) was also extremely supportive, reaffirming that this is not the kind of behavior we’d want to espouse with future managers and leaders of the firm. He escalated the situation to HR, who has noted this on this employee’s record. While I’m not sure if any further steps will be taken, I’m glad there was an open communication channel between me and my manager where my opinion was respected and handled with sensitivity. 

Networking isn't just about meeting people to get career help. It's also about meeting others that you can help. We always remember those who have gone out of their way to be helpful. Also, people move around and you never know where they will land. So make an impression that you are a 'go to' person who can be relied on for help, and you’ll find your kindness repaid in a million ways.

×