It is a very demanding profession as one needs to devote all her time and attention to work alone leaving less time for family. So when people have kids and don't have someone back at home to rear them, it becomes a source of constant guilt and grief for everyone in the system. It becomes extremely competitive and political at the senior management levels as only a few people can be accommodated at that level. If one is not able to give her 100% to work for whatever reasons, it becomes difficult to compete. It finally boils to the candidate's personal rapport with the top management and conscious gender sensitivity on the part of the organisation to get over this hurdle. Most firms are found wanting on this factor though in recent times at least the established ones with a large work force are trying to be conscious about it.

“It is important to broaden the students’ awareness of the various career paths to help them understand the magnitude of opportunities beyond investment banking,” Scott said. “Ultimately, we hope that all our students build on the skills they learn in the classroom and in their first destination jobs to find their area of interest. We regularly talk to the students about their careers being a marathon, with many pivots, twists and turns. It is not a sprint.”


Invest In Women 2019 is the leading forum nationwide to explore, discuss and learn about issues that are meaningful for women financial advisors and female clients. Both male and female advisors are invited to this event that promises insight and networking to help practices grow. The 2019 conference will offer expanded programming that reflects input from prior attendees as well as other industry leaders. Take the opportunity to be inspired — and have fun — at a conference you won’t want to miss. Plan to be there and register now.
Olivia Ott talked about how her perception of the industry does not match the reality. Her expression has two points of view. First, she hates the desire to pursue only money or only to be rich. She thinks it is particularly annoying. I have seen a movie, the Wolf of Wall Street, the whole film pinpoints the importance of money. I’m not sure whether this is the belief of the whole financial market. I’m still in doubt if people who hold other values than money will have to change themselves to fit into the atmosphere. Secondly, Olivia thinks that her peers in Princeton have already made a step ahead of her, and she hasn’t started yet. So she felt the pressure. I feel the same way as she did in my school life, but her experience is inspiring. From her point of view, not every company was making money just for money, and not everyone was born in the finance industry. These two understandings are meaningful for many women who want to dig into this field but fear to do so. Although the finance world has been influenced by those very extreme and monetary supremacy, it is not the whole finance world. Rather, it still has some bright sides. For instance, people can make contributions, such as ESG’s 3 social good orientation investments through money.
There’s just one problem: Despite being aces at investing, women just aren’t doing enough of it. Women overall invest 40 percent less money than men do according to a survey by digital investment platform Wealthsimple. And if given the opportunity to do more, many women wouldn’t step up. In a recent survey by Lexington Law — which asked men and women what they’d do with an extra $1,000 — men were 35 percent more likely than women to say they would invest the money.

These sentiments are certainly understandable, and I believe the way to change these perceptions is through educating people about finance, just as GWI is doing. As you mentioned, experience is the best way to learn about the industry, hence my partner and I are currently working on creating a student investment fund so that students can learn about finance fundamentals by managing a portfolio and making trades in the real world. Like you, we also plan to participate in the KWHS Investment Competition for the first time as well. Furthermore, just after learning about ESG from GWI Scholar Olivia Ott, I am going to research it more and include it in our Investment Policy Statement. I respect what GWI is doing, and I hope by exposing students to the more positive and interesting aspects of finance, I could dispel the incomplete and negative misconceptions. Eventually, I hope students of different genders and races can explore and perhaps commit to the finance industry in the future.

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During my internship, my colleagues were very accessible, friendly, and treated me like a full member of the team, which was key when it came to deciding if I wanted to work here. From the first project I was involved in, my team listened to my opinion and copied me into emails to clients. I felt I was trusted and valued from the outset, which I didn't experience when I did internships at banks in France - it's part of the J.P. Morgan culture.
You should not have any credit card debt. This means you pay off your credit card balances in full every month. Why credit card debt in particular? Because if you aren’t paying that off every month, you aren’t making enough to support your basic living expenses. Once you get a budget that keeps you out of the red on a monthly basis (excluding debt like student or car loans), then you can start thinking about investing. (If you have credit card debt, try our Get Out of Debt Bootcamp.)
Bonus interest is subject to eligibility. ANZ Progress Saver pays bonus interest (in addition to the current variable base interest) in respect of a particular month if the set minimum deposit (currently $10) and no withdrawals, fees or charges are processed to the account on or before the last business day of that calendar month, and after the last business day of the previous calendar month. Bonus and base rates are variable and subject to change.
“The GWI program is one of the programs that the institute is implementing to make more female students aware of the careers in investment management,” Mary Scott, associate director of the Notre Dame Institute for Global Investing (NDIGI), said of the program. “As we broaden awareness of how intellectually stimulating and rewarding these types of careers can be, our hope is that more females will be interested in pursuing this industry.”
Again, thanks for your reply. In fact, I interned in IBD this summer and despite the long hours, now that I reflect on it, I very much enjoyed it, mostly for its very steep learning curve (I don’t recall learning as much in high school or university). I obviously didn’t get the technical exposure that I had wanted (and I guess no brainer there because I don’t come from a financial backdrop).
MS. SMITH: So, you mentioned you went back to school. So, let's just back up a little bit more because I think most people would know you as a model, and on, you know, thousands of covers of magazines. Which is still happening today but in a different way for a different cause. But how did that—tell us about that journey and then how that informed sort of your decisions and your next steps. 

“My biggest advice to women who want to save more money is to make more money,” said financial expert Nicole Lapin, the winner of GOBankingRates.com’s 2015 Best Money Expert competition. “When you stop looking at your financial life as something of deprivation and more of something as aspiration, that’s when you actually feel comfortable of taking control of your own finances.”
MS. TURLINGTON BURNS: Well, I guess, I mean, mainly we started after the film came out. We were a resource. You know, who's doing what where was the way we sort of saw ourselves. And through that, I got to meet a lot of different organizations working in maternal health. Also, as a student of Public Health, you know, the world is fairly small in the maternal child health space. So, I started to get to meet a lot of incredible people who have been working their entire careers, Melanne being one of those people. And so, you know, having access to women who were leaders in these areas was incredibly inspiring. And then in terms of finding partners, I mean we started as a campaign, and then I learned that that wasn't completely fulfilling. I felt like I wanted to do more and I wanted to really connect people who were being moved by learning this information and wanting to do something that it was really hard for them to do that. So, I felt like ultimately starting an organization that I could have more control. Being able to put those pieces together and connect those dots was a lot more gratifying, not only for the community we were trying to bring along but also for the NGOs on the ground. And what I've found over time is that smaller, grassroots, community-led groups are the most exciting to work with because they truly do partner with you. And we have, as an organization, funded some larger initiatives, and you know, it's hard to get the phone picked up, and it's hard to—you know, there's a lot of turnover in the people who run the program, and you just want to, you want to have that human touch, and so, it's something that I really strive for with Every Mother Counts to continue to have that human touch. It's the most human of all issues that I can think of, and for people who have an experience or suffer a loss, or lose a loved one, or the healthcare providers that are trying to, you know, provide services every day, I think it's really important that all of those people feel, you know, respected, and have a voice, and that we can be there for them.
Many women see financial planning as a way to protect against the unexpected, explains Bast. “The problem with concentrating your savings in lower-risk assets, such as cash, is that your money won’t grow fast enough to help fund your retirement and other long-term goals. You should consider investing a portion of your money in assets with the potential for growth. The best way to get started? Understand your tolerance for risk and find an appropriate allocation for your portfolio that allows you to sleep at night.”

I cannot echo this enough. There is a female in a high level position at my firm and whenever she visits we go out for drinks where she spends the entire time trying to be one of the guys. Making stripper jokes, talking about football, etc. I mean not in a natural way either. It is constant during the entire conversation and obviously forced. Maybe some insecure little betas find it endearing. However,I find it annoying and it makes me think I can't trust anything she says since she's always putting on a grotesque facade. The world has changed so much I think it best to just be yourself. Yes there may be some misogynist leftovers from the Madmen days, but their numbers are dwindling and with that their power over your career.
Be judicious about reporting it. If it happens during an on-campus interview, talk to your college career office. They’ll determine how to address it with the company and can anonymize their report. It’s harder to report harassment if it happens at an informal event and you’re not an employee of the firm. As much as I hate to let guys get away with this behavior, you may have to let it go for the time being if that’s the case. Calling the firm to report him runs the risk of branding you as a potential liability – but you can tell other women in your network about it so they know to watch out.
If you qualify for extra savings on out-of-pocket costs OR want more of your costs covered: Silver plans probably offer the best value. If you qualify for extra savings (“cost-sharing reductions”) your deductible will be lower and you’ll pay less each time you get care. But you get these extra savings ONLY if you enroll in Silver plan. This can save you hundreds or even thousands of dollars a year if you use a lot of care. Even if you don’t qualify for extra savings, Silver plans offer good value — moderate premiums and deductibles, and better coverage of your out-of-pocket costs than a Bronze or Catastrophic plan provide.
Younger men are far more likely to invest according to their values than their fathers were; 81% of millennial men in Morgan Stanley’s survey were interested in sustainable investing. And though fewer American men than women say they want to invest in companies with diverse leadership, the share is still sizeable, at 42%. If gender-lens investing is truly to take off, it will have to appeal to those who control the bulk of wealth—and that is still men.
In a sign of their higher risk aversion, 90 percent of female Millennials said they held cash assets, such as money market funds or certificates of deposit (CDs). While these savings vehicles guarantee you'll get your money back, the returns are slight. The average nationwide money market account yields just 0.18 percent, and a one-year CD pays 2.21 percent in interest, according to Bankrate.com. Those modest returns compare with a 4 percent gain for the broad stock market this year and a nearly 20 percent gain in 2017. 

Women control $11.2 trillion of investable assets in the United States, according to a study by Sylvia Ann Hewlett and Turner Moffitt at the Center for Talent Innovation. "Where investing is made accessible and approachable for women, women not only invest more but are better investors," said Sallie Krawcheck, the former top Wall Street executive now working on an online financial advisor called Ellevest, aimed at women, which is set to launch this year.
The lack of confidence carries a big cost. For instance, more young women than young men defer retirement planning in their 20s, according to the Employee Benefits Research Institute. They take Social Security early, cutting their lifetime benefits. And financial advisors have long noted that wives often defer to their husbands, even though research shows that generally speaking, women are better investors than men.

The first bank we had been to reach break-even when we were eight months, the 15th private bank reached a break even in years, and we're the only bank in the country that we were able to give dividend the first year, where the rest of the other banks were able to give dividend after three years. So, we have so many objectives focusing in our unique bank. We were able to develop unique products and services, credit and saving schemes. We also do provide men financial services so that we keep our women boards of finance in the capacity managing the finance.


MS. JOSEFINA URZAIZ: Thank you. First of all, well thank you, I'm very grateful to be here and honored to be part of this as a mentee in this week. Our organizations that lead have the goal to alleviate poverty, and the way we do this is by empowering women in rural communities in Mexico where I'm from. We employ 900 women who hand weave the hammocks from home, so I don't break that family structure. And to give you perspective, each hammock takes about two weeks to weave because they do it in their spare time, and the impact that we have reaches 3,200 people on an everyday basis.
The consensus among most financial professionals is that asset allocation is one of the most important decisions that investors make. In other words, your selection of individual securities is secondary to the way you allocate your investment in stocks, bonds, and cash and equivalents, which will be the principal determinants of your investment results. Figure out your goals and then allocate your assets accordingly.

MS. SPELLINGS: --moderator here. Melanne, the table could be turned on this easily and Melanne and I have worked together for many, many years on these issues with President Clinton, President Bush, President Obama, Michelle Obama, Laura Bush, and on and on and on. And I think that's, as I've listened to Christy and thought about the qualities that we try to engender as women leaders, patience, working with others, listening, being goal oriented, understanding it's for the long-haul, being touched by something personal as Christy was often related to children and women and vulnerable populations. I mean all of those things really are at our core beliefs—as women.
Thank you for your coverage on this important issue. There have been some recent studies that breakout women in investment roles vs. those in what HBS Professor Lietz deems to be the "pink ghetto" or IR/Marketing/Portfolio Operations. Based on data from Professor Lietz and Preqin, it appears that women represent between 0% and 10% of senior investment professional staff at any given PE firm. Preqin came out with a report showing that women represent 9% of investment professionals at the senior level, 15% at the mid-level, and 24% at the junior level. This means that 42% of women fall away at the mid-level which points to the crux of the issue described in your report: women aren't moving past the junior, subordinated role into mid-level "decision-making" roles. This is likely due to bias within the firms' MBA recruiting and promotion panels.
This report is not intended to be a client-specific suitability analysis or recommendation; an offer to participate in any investment; or a recommendation to buy, hold, or sell securities. Do not use this report as the sole basis for investment decisions. Do not select an asset class or investment product based on performance alone. Consider all relevant information, including your existing portfolio, investment objectives, risk tolerance, liquidity needs, and investment time horizon.
In a sign of their higher risk aversion, 90 percent of female Millennials said they held cash assets, such as money market funds or certificates of deposit (CDs). While these savings vehicles guarantee you'll get your money back, the returns are slight. The average nationwide money market account yields just 0.18 percent, and a one-year CD pays 2.21 percent in interest, according to Bankrate.com. Those modest returns compare with a 4 percent gain for the broad stock market this year and a nearly 20 percent gain in 2017.
As an alternative, open a savings account with a high annual percentage yield (APY), which means you’ll earn interest based on how much you deposit into your savings account. According to Bankrate.com, a good APY is between 3 and 5 percent. Make sure when that your direct deposit hits, you’re automating your payments into your savings account that way you won’t forget. However, make sure it is not easily accessible to make withdrawals from your savings. If you feel you don’t have the self-control to not withdraw from your savings, here’s a few reasons why you should keep your checking and savings account at different banks, according to LearnVest.
The consensus among most financial professionals is that asset allocation is one of the most important decisions that investors make. In other words, your selection of individual securities is secondary to the way you allocate your investment in stocks, bonds, and cash and equivalents, which will be the principal determinants of your investment results. Figure out your goals and then allocate your assets accordingly.
While parents remain the top source of financial advice for most women, only 20 percent said they felt well prepared by their parents to manage their finances as an adult. Even fewer said they learned about these topics in school. Only 24 percent learned about budgeting and setting financial goals; 14 percent said they learned about investing. Overall, only nine percent of women said their education through high school left them well prepared to manage personal finances as an adult. A slightly better 10 percent said this of their college education9.

Women live, on average, five to seven years longer than men (depending on when they were born). Their money has to stretch longer, and if they are married, it is important to note that some of the biggest health care costs are incurred in the year prior to death, so if they survive their husbands, it is possible that their financial resources may be reduced by medical expenses. Married women tend to suffer significant losses in income when their spouse dies.


During my internship, my colleagues were very accessible, friendly, and treated me like a full member of the team, which was key when it came to deciding if I wanted to work here. From the first project I was involved in, my team listened to my opinion and copied me into emails to clients. I felt I was trusted and valued from the outset, which I didn't experience when I did internships at banks in France - it's part of the J.P. Morgan culture.
Although making a big career change can be a wonderful moment in your life, acting impulsively could really backfire. There are countless stories of people who made quick decisions to leave their current working worlds for new ones, only to discover that they were ill-informed and really had no idea what they were getting into and wound up being just as unhappy—or even unhappier—as they were before. Don’t become just another unfortunate member of this group. Plan wisely and carefully, and you’ll be setting yourself up for a real shot at positive and lasting change.
Our culture emphasizes teamwork and collaboration. My coworkers are great—really smart, driven, hard workers with whom I’ve developed several friendships (key to surviving those super late nights) and what I expect will be life-long relationships. Many of the senior folks on our floor also make a great effort to get to know their teams and serve as mentors.
Each guest speaker has no fewer than ten years’ experience in the industry, working at at least one well-known organisation. Citi’s Louise, however, has a banking career that pre-dates the euro – spanning two decades. That’s because Louise, who was one of ten students to join Lehman Brothers' graduate scheme in 1995, knew from an early age that she wanted to be a banker.
‘It’s not really relevant whether you are a man or a woman in investment banking,’ said Lorraine. ‘You are one of the team from the beginning.’ Macquarie Capital’s Tara agreed: ‘Men and women face very similar challenges; all employees have to evolve and make a successful transition from an analyst to being able to sell and generate money. It’s the same for men and women in that respect.’
As an analyst, I'm also part of an employee networking group called Junior Women Connect, which organises a range of networking and career events. Last year we organised an event called "Power Dressing 101", which consisted of an evening in an L.K. Bennett store hosted by a professional stylist who advised us on how to dress for work and the impact of our image on people's perceptions of us.
MS. SMITH: So, you mentioned you went back to school. So, let's just back up a little bit more because I think most people would know you as a model, and on, you know, thousands of covers of magazines. Which is still happening today but in a different way for a different cause. But how did that—tell us about that journey and then how that informed sort of your decisions and your next steps.
I think the summer curriculum of this nonprofit organization is very helpful. It mentioned that there are much fewer women professionals than men in the financial market. This may be due to the industry’s prejudice against women. The industry tends to consider women have less advantages than men, or women have more commitments not only to work, but also to their families. Some of these thoughts are true, but some are not. Women need more mentorship and empowerment. As the articles mentioned above, these students brought not much understanding before the camps. After the camps, however, they learned about, and mastered financial knowledge and tools. This learning process will benefit and illuminate their own future.The potential of improving women’s financial knowledge is very big. But the existing problem is that women just are not getting the right guidance and empowerment. For example, these teenagers. They didn’t have much financial knowledge. But through this project, they started to be familiar with finance, and understand finance. With a more positive understanding of money, their life may be improved .
PIMCO’s global Inclusion, Diversity & Culture (IDC) initiative seeks to heighten our employees’ appreciation for diverse perspectives and skills, which in turn will facilitate increased collaboration and enhance our ability to attract, retain, develop, and engage top talent – all of which we believe will lead to better outcomes for our clients and PIMCO.
Like Olivia Ott’s, my perception of asset management and finance is not an extremely positive one. Although I really like economics and do consider going into finance, I feel like it is still a male-dominated industry. Sheryl Sandberg says that we women have to “lean in” in the workplace, but that is easier said than done. Even in school, I feel uneasy to speak up in a class dominated by boys, imagine the same scenario, but in the workplace!
MS. TURLINGTON BURNS: We've trained hundreds of new midwives in Guatemala, Haiti, Syria, and Bangladesh. But access to quality maternal healthcare is not only a problem in the developing world, many American women are struggling to find the support they need throughout their pregnancies. Two women die every day giving birth in the US. So, we're giving grants to community-based programs in the U.S. that are providing pre-natal care, childbirth education, and doula services for low-income women.
Conventional wisdom “blames” women for this gap. We receive messages that we’re not as good at math as men; we’re not as good at investing. Um, no. Studies have found that once women do invest, they outperform men by nearly one percentage point a year. This was confirmed recently by Fidelity, which analyzed the performance of 8 million retail clients in 2016. Typically women outperform because they don’t overtrade, panic in down markets, or pay too much in fees.
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