“It’s refreshing to see the mindset around retirement evolve, particularly a strong optimism and a goal-oriented approach from younger generations,” said Aron Levine, head of Merrill Edge at Bank of America. “This focus is a great start, but one of the keys to a successful retirement is to ensure savings are prioritized early and often. Year over year, we continue to see today’s non-retirees struggle with the impact short-term spending has on their long-term financial future.”
VP Nancy Wilson worked in a variety of marketing and business development roles in the I.T. and telecom industries before joining the business development team at Allegiance Capital. Her life as an Air Force brat, in a family where she was the only girl with four brothers, helped shape her “extroverted, super-high-energy personality. I jump in feet first a lot.”
My department is pretty much evenly split, so imbalance between men and women wasn't something I took into account when deciding whether or not to join the bank. Other departments may be slightly weighted one way or the other, but that shouldn't discourage anyone from pursuing a career in investment banking. If anything, it should give women more incentive to join the industry, make it more feminine and challenge the stereotype that investment banking is male-dominated. In my experience at J.P. Morgan, men and women are treated equally. I've never felt that I'm at a disadvantage because I'm a woman.
MS. TURLINGTON BURNS: Yeah, I mean I feel into my first career. I was very young. I think I started modeling when I was about the age of my daughter now, which is shocking in a different way. But because my mother is from Central America and I spent my early years traveling a lot around the world, but particularly to Central America I just was really aware of disparities. And coming back and forth from communities abroad and then communities back home because there are also populations with a lot of need here in the U.S. And I think as a young person being able to travel a lot and take that information in I think, you know, it's sort of led me on a path of not knowing exactly what but wanting to be a purpose of use. And so, it took time and I wouldn't have thought my career would take me there, but I certainly got to see a lot of the world through that industry in my work as a model. And then, you know, as soon as I was only a model and I wasn't a student and a model I wanted to go back to school. I knew that like okay this is great and I'm getting a lot of freedom and I have a lot of opportunity but I want to go back to school. So, I think I— things didn't really slow down for me in my career but I made a conscious effort to go back to undergrad in my mid-20s.

“It is important to broaden the students’ awareness of the various career paths to help them understand the magnitude of opportunities beyond investment banking,” Scott said. “Ultimately, we hope that all our students build on the skills they learn in the classroom and in their first destination jobs to find their area of interest. We regularly talk to the students about their careers being a marathon, with many pivots, twists and turns. It is not a sprint.”


One of my favorite African proverbs says that if you want to go fast go it alone, but if you want to go far go together. And that's certainly what we're going to be talking about on this panel today. I'm thrilled to be joined by first Oulimata Sarr. She is a Regional Advisor for economic empowerment of women with UN Women. UN Women is the UN agency responsible for women's, responsible for women's empowerment, economic, political, and otherwise. Next to her is Katerina Cronstedt. She is a serial entrepreneur from Russia. She in my opinion, reading her bio, has led many lives, fit so much in, and she is currently the founder of Bankatering, and we'll hear a little bit more about that in a minute. And finally, you've already met Christine Katziff from Bank of America. She is the Global General Auditor. It's great that you have time to join us, that sounds like a really big job.


I'm an analyst, and female, and find that the majority of women in this industry are complete bchs. Sorry to say but it's true! I've met a few that are exceptions, but it's almost as if they're trying to prove something - something like "I'm tough, I can handle these crazy men, etc." And it just seems so phony. It's ok to be feminine and a woman AND still be great at what you do.
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So, if you’re eager to make a major job or career change… you guessed it, make a plan. Consider making a list of pros and cons for taking the plunge. If everything in your life is pointing to making a major change, figure out what new goal makes the most sense for you. Take an inventory of your skills and experience, along with your interests and aspirations, and figure out which careers/industries you best align with. Do you have any friends or family who have jobs that sound potentially intriguing to you? If so, ask them more about it. Do your research—the Internet is a great source of information for researching new companies and careers.

So how do women break the investment barrier in ways that can lead to lifelong financial independence? Sabbia has three key suggestions: learn the basics, define your goals, and invest in yourself. For more advanced investors, Sabbia suggests being a mentor that can help break the silence around talking about money. Doing so could accelerate the close of that wealth gap for all women. Let's examine each recommendation in closer detail.
Because women are more inclined to do research and more likely to exhibit patience than men, they’re well equipped to take the same disciplined approach to selling as they do to buying and are less prone to unloading their stocks during a market panic. Ketterer suggests establishing triggers that prompt the reevaluation of each holding. A trigger could be a set date (say, at the end of a quarter or the end of a year), or it could be a specific rise or fall in the share price. Ketterer sets a target price for each stock she buys and reevaluates it when the price approaches that level. A falling stock price is not a reason to sell, she says. But it may indicate that your initial analysis was flawed and requires review. “The greater the frequency of review of a company, its industry and the economic environment, the better,” she adds.

The majority of the scholarship opportunities featured on the TFS Scholarships website come directly from colleges and universities, rather than solely from competitive national pools – thereby increasing the chances of finding scholarships that are the best fit for aspiring and current undergraduate, graduate and professional students. Each month TFS adds more than 5,000 new scholarships to its database in an effort to stay current with national scholarship growth rates – maximizing the number of opportunities students have to earn funding for their education.

thank you for your comment. i have been making some peripheral observations based on my older sibling's friends and classmates who are considering IB related works after college. based on my non representative samplings, those who are going into IB --at least the applying stage-- are typical alpha male loud mouth who try to get ahead by stepping on others. others are turned off by this. thus i want to assess on my own if IB community is actually looking for competitive folks that are competitive in that manner. i want to hear the facts or real experiences, instead of PC talk.
Formally known as Billguard, this financial planning app not only helps you create a budget, but they have a swipe-left, swipe-right feature where users can verify which of their expenses are theirs and which aren’t. Their specialty? Protecting their users from identity theft (more on this later). Features also includes helping users track their credit score. They also have Credit Card Optimizer feature, where users can track all of their credit card info, and helps users make better financial decisions with their credit cards. They also have a blog to keep you informed on all Prosper Daily’s updates along with useful financial tips.
My role involves providing pricing updates, writing market reports, assisting with the execution of transactions and some direct work with clients. It's a busy and demanding environment and I get asked to do plenty of different things during the day. My job involves a lot of multi-tasking, but I have to pay close attention to detail and be able to prioritise urgent requests.

Olivia Ott talked about how her perception of the industry does not match the reality. Her expression has two points of view. First, she hates the desire to pursue only money or only to be rich. She thinks it is particularly annoying. I have seen a movie, the Wolf of Wall Street, the whole film pinpoints the importance of money. I’m not sure whether this is the belief of the whole financial market. I’m still in doubt if people who hold other values than money will have to change themselves to fit into the atmosphere. Secondly, Olivia thinks that her peers in Princeton have already made a step ahead of her, and she hasn’t started yet. So she felt the pressure. I feel the same way as she did in my school life, but her experience is inspiring. From her point of view, not every company was making money just for money, and not everyone was born in the finance industry. These two understandings are meaningful for many women who want to dig into this field but fear to do so. Although the finance world has been influenced by those very extreme and monetary supremacy, it is not the whole finance world. Rather, it still has some bright sides. For instance, people can make contributions, such as ESG’s 3 social good orientation investments through money.

From a male perspective, very interesting to read. Never thought about these issues women face in networking, and I’ve never had any such problem (that I know of!) in networking I’ve done with women or they with me. Still though, good to keep in mind when networking with women to prevent any misinterpretations or problems. Thanks for this article; this subject should be talked about a lot more.
i am not too sure what red flags really mean here, but glad to see your mention of "vast majority", which means that there are still some fields out there that are more men dominant and that loops back to my original question. i did not, mind you, say, it is men dominant or both sexes being equal in IB. I simply asked the question to get some feedbacks.
Being a diverse and inclusive company is essential to our ability to meet the needs of our clients, communities and employees. As a part of this, we empower women to make meaningful contributions within our company and in our communities. We have strong representation of women at all levels and we are focused on attracting, retaining and developing our diverse talent. We also recognize that women play a vital role in driving economic growth, and we have many partnerships to connect women entrepreneurs to mentoring, capital and other tools that will advance their businesses and make significant contributions to our global economy.
MS. VERVEER: It's been part of our journeys. But I often think that women may not think about this being a place for them, not just running for office, elective office, which is probably the hardest challenge of all if one looks at any of the data out there today, but certainly service at the national level, at the local level, school boards, town collectives that come together to solve problems. This has obviously been a huge reward in your life. You've demonstrated exceptional leadership skills. Help us understand why this is a real opportunity for women and the rewards of this.

Simply put, women don’t invest as much as men do. And they don’t invest as early as men do, either. Of all the assets women control—both inside and outside their portfolios—they keep a full 71% in cash, according to a survey by BlackRock, whereas men hold 60%. Cash may feel like zero risk, but it also has zero potential to grow as stocks do over time. And even with low inflation, the purchasing power of that cash will decline over time. So the price of certainty you get with cash is high.


I really believe in passive investing and using technology to build really smart portfolios for people who don’t have the time, interest, or expertise to do the research (to figure out risk tolerance and asset allocation and diversification). There’s a new type of investment service that does this—but it has a terrible name: robo-advisor. The way it works is incredibly simple: You sign up, answer a bunch of questions about how old you are, your financial situation, what you’re saving for, and then the company, like Wealthsimple, will instantly build you a portfolio.
It’s incredibly beneficial to your career to broaden your network outside your immediate team. If you build relationships with colleagues in other teams or divisions, it’ll give you a support network you can turn to for career advice. I think that having a good network can also help you do your job better, because you are better connected to the wider business.
The only reason I would say no is b/c finance is by far the major white-collar industry of NYC. In the manhattan neighborhood I lived in, I was intrigued whenever I met a person who didn't work in finance. I mean there's finance, real estate (which might also be considered finance) and law. However there's also random consulting companies and some large corporate HQ that are still in NYC. In the end though finance can be pretty broad pay-wise and workweek-wise.
Who among us doesn’t want a loftier position with a more impressive sounding title and a higher salary, regardless of where we currently work? The truth is, this isn’t always an immediately attainable reality for everyone—maybe you’re just getting started at your current job and it’s too soon to start thinking about a promotion, or maybe the place you work at is small and there’s no clear upward trajectory. Whatever the reason, if you’re seeking a promotion and there’s no obvious path for growth for you in your current job, perhaps this means you should make a more drastic change as part of your New Year’s resolution planning.
By Mansi Gupta, Design Specialist, Women’s World Banking  “If a hospital isn’t involved, I’m healthy enough.” Women’s World Banking spoke with women in India to better understand their views on health, health emergencies and the role of insurance. By understanding their attitudes on health issues, Women’s World Banking will work to increase uptake and usage […]

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From a male perspective, very interesting to read. Never thought about these issues women face in networking, and I’ve never had any such problem (that I know of!) in networking I’ve done with women or they with me. Still though, good to keep in mind when networking with women to prevent any misinterpretations or problems. Thanks for this article; this subject should be talked about a lot more.
MS. HAILE: We finance startups, again small and medium enterprises, also expand businesses. So, most of them are involved in agriculture, manufacturing, export/import, transport, communications, etcetera. Coming to the size of the loans, we have two loans, which we do like any other conventional commercial bank. We give loans because the bank is for both women and men because we don't exclude me, even though the bank is for women. Quite a good number of women are banking honestly with us because they love our objectives and what we're doing. So, in this respect the government of Ethiopia has set its own policy on collateral requirements, which is 100% plus. But for us, we have eased the collateral for women for this conventional part of the loan from 51 to 70. So, in this process out of, you know, we're a young bank, it's only three years, so out of the 942 borrowers 309, 33% are women, which we are very glad because we have waived that from 100% plus to 51 to 70. So, the loan size on average is 1.8 million U.S. dollars. Again, we have another loan, which we call the risk fund, the grantee fund, which voluntarily we have set aside a certain amount of money for those small and medium enterprises, mainly growth-oriented businesses, who need money but they don't have the collateral. So, this is the side of the loan which we provide, and so far we were able to give 610 businesses, women's businesses in this part of the loan. We have thousands of women on the line on that because of the problem of collateral. But lucky we were, a few months back we were able to sign grant fund from U.S. - - ten million U.S. dollars from the grantee fund. You know, when you improve working everybody comes to support you. So, now we are now ready to expand our loan on the risk fund side again, also working more on the conventional part. 

"As more women invest, we will demonstrate through a show of force that we believe in each other enough to invest in each other — whether we can invest $1 or millions. We will do this by choosing investments that advance women and help improve our world. We will commit 25% of our investment portfolios to “impact investments” by 2025." — Let’s Disrupt Money
although it sounds great---i am not being argumentative--that more females are getting into fields previously dominated by males, i think it is still an uphill battle thus important to get a feel to the environment and culture. there may be unwarranted traditions, but there may also be some practical considerations, that is, some fields are better suited for one sex vs the other for understandable reasons. say, most top surgeons are males. heck, most top OB GYNs are males!
In a recent survey by Morgan Stanley 84% of women said they were interested in “sustainable” investing, that is, targeting not just financial returns but social or environmental goals. The figure for men was 67%. Matthew Patsky of Trillium Asset Management, a sustainable-investment firm, estimates that two-thirds of the firm’s direct clients who are investing as individuals are women. Among the couples who are joint clients, investing sustainably has typically been the wife’s idea. Julia Balandina Jaquier, an impact-investment adviser in Zurich, says that though women who inherit wealth are often less confident than men about how to invest it, when it comes to investing with a social impact “women are more often prepared to be the risk-takers and trailblazers.”
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