It is a very demanding profession as one needs to devote all her time and attention to work alone leaving less time for family. So when people have kids and don't have someone back at home to rear them, it becomes a source of constant guilt and grief for everyone in the system. It becomes extremely competitive and political at the senior management levels as only a few people can be accommodated at that level. If one is not able to give her 100% to work for whatever reasons, it becomes difficult to compete. It finally boils to the candidate's personal rapport with the top management and conscious gender sensitivity on the part of the organisation to get over this hurdle. Most firms are found wanting on this factor though in recent times at least the established ones with a large work force are trying to be conscious about it.
Conventional wisdom “blames” women for this gap. We receive messages that we’re not as good at math as men; we’re not as good at investing. Um, no. Studies have found that once women do invest, they outperform men by nearly one percentage point a year. This was confirmed recently by Fidelity, which analyzed the performance of 8 million retail clients in 2016. Typically women outperform because they don’t overtrade, panic in down markets, or pay too much in fees.

But anyway, so I think the first thing is we have to say that is our expectation. It's our expectation that, you know, nearly everybody, 70% of the jobs in this state damn near are going to require post-secondary education, not necessarily a baccalaureate degree, but at least two years of education with a credential after high school, an associate's degree, some kind of stackable credential, a skill. Certainly the jobs at this organization are, certainly the jobs that you all are creating as entrepreneurs and leaders require skill and knowledge.

But anyway, so I think the first thing is we have to say that is our expectation. It's our expectation that, you know, nearly everybody, 70% of the jobs in this state damn near are going to require post-secondary education, not necessarily a baccalaureate degree, but at least two years of education with a credential after high school, an associate's degree, some kind of stackable credential, a skill. Certainly the jobs at this organization are, certainly the jobs that you all are creating as entrepreneurs and leaders require skill and knowledge.
BOSTON — When it comes to saving and investing one's hard earned money, who has greater overall success: men or women? If your immediate reaction was "men," then a new study from Fidelity Investments® may come as something of a surprise—and you wouldn't be alone. In fact, when asked who they believed made the better investor this past year, a mere nine percent of women thought they would outperform men1. And yet, a growing body of evidence, including an analysis of more than eight million clients from Fidelity2, shows that women actually tend to outperform men when it comes to generating a return on their investments.
Every time I was in an awarding of an Scientific Olympiad in my country (Brazil), I found strange that there were much more boys than girls, and it was a truth since 6th grade until High School. Well, I could not accept that there were nothing wrong with it because I knew some very intelligent girls. Before I get into High School, I studied in a regular class and some of the best grades were from girls, they potential was tremendous but they simply did not want to dedicate to this side. When I moved from my school to another and entered in a class focused in Sciences (Math, Physics and Chemistry) I realized that the majority of boys were a problem not just in the Olympiads, but in this area (STEM) itself (ant least in my country, but I believe that it unfortunately extends to other places as well). For me, it’s impossible to assume that this situation is due to a kind of “difficult” that girls would have in this subjects, as some supposes, even because some woman that I know are more than excellent at them. I believe that it’s a result of cultural scars left by a past in which girls were destined to stay in home and take care of things, a work that does not necessarily require much study. Than boys mass-dominated the STEM area. And now, due to the lack of representativity, the young girls don’t see themselves in this areas as much boys do. They do not look and imagine they being successful at it because very few were. They basically judge themselves as incapable and the shore as impossible. Of course, it’s not true, but some of them think it is. And so, the lack of women in this area causes a lack of women entering in this area… a loop. A sad loop…
MS. HAILE: Finance being the major constraint, I don't think it's the only one. Of course, we'd have to design strategies that women have access to finance. But again, women entrepeneurs being community caretakers, there's so many obligations in place with playing multiple roles. I believe that the business environment has to be women- friendly, starting from the policy. So, everything has to be there for them to start and to expand their business for those—particularly the young ones, who also want to start new businesses. So, equally important as finance, I believe there are so many constraints that hamper women to expand in business or start a business. The cultural barriers when it comes to my country and in our continent and elsewhere. The access to markets, the information available, disposable at their facilities close to them because of the particular role they're playing. So, I believe we have lots of things to do. And at the moment I'm here now being part of the Global Ambassadors Program I sincerely would like to thank Bank of America. I don't think many do it like this, partnering with institutions like Vital Voices .
MS. TURLINGTON BURNS: We've trained hundreds of new midwives in Guatemala, Haiti, Syria, and Bangladesh. But access to quality maternal healthcare is not only a problem in the developing world, many American women are struggling to find the support they need throughout their pregnancies. Two women die every day giving birth in the US. So, we're giving grants to community-based programs in the U.S. that are providing pre-natal care, childbirth education, and doula services for low-income women.
Again, thanks for your reply. In fact, I interned in IBD this summer and despite the long hours, now that I reflect on it, I very much enjoyed it, mostly for its very steep learning curve (I don’t recall learning as much in high school or university). I obviously didn’t get the technical exposure that I had wanted (and I guess no brainer there because I don’t come from a financial backdrop).
Most women don’t think they know enough about investing to properly grow their savings; therefore, they wait to start investing until they feel they’re more financially stable and believe they can risk the possibility of losing money. A common misconception around investing is that you have to be an expert in the industry to succeed when the reality is that there are so many tools and resources that make easy to start investing with as little as your pocket change.
In a recent survey by Morgan Stanley 84% of women said they were interested in “sustainable” investing, that is, targeting not just financial returns but social or environmental goals. The figure for men was 67%. Matthew Patsky of Trillium Asset Management, a sustainable-investment firm, estimates that two-thirds of the firm’s direct clients who are investing as individuals are women. Among the couples who are joint clients, investing sustainably has typically been the wife’s idea. Julia Balandina Jaquier, an impact-investment adviser in Zurich, says that though women who inherit wealth are often less confident than men about how to invest it, when it comes to investing with a social impact “women are more often prepared to be the risk-takers and trailblazers.”
That’s why it’s important for women to invest in companies that support other women. One example? Pax Ellevate Global Women’s Index Fund (PXWEX). It’s a mutual fund with Sallie Krawcheck, the leader of women’s digital financial advisor Ellevest, serving as chair. Here’s the scoop: It rates companies based on how well they advance gender diversity—like how many women serve on the board or as executive managers—and puts your money towards the ones that come out on top. It’s based on global research that shows having more women at the helm can increase return and lower costs, says Blayney. As for the results? The fund outperformed the MSCI World Index for the three-year period ending September 30, 2017. 

Kiva Microfunds is a nonprofit organization and microloan tool allowing people to lend money to others in need around the world, starting at $25. It focuses on low-income entrepreneurs and students in over 80 countries, making it easy to seek out women and invest in their futures. The organization has a 97 percent loan repayment rate and a four-star rating from Charity Navigator. A higher-cost option is SheEO, a company that takes donations in the amount of $1,100 to support early women entrepreneurs and grow their businesses.
But just having a big shiny goal doesn’t qualify you to open an investment account just yet. After all, if the only thing you needed to have in order to start investing was the desire to have more money, then a lot more people would have investment accounts. (According to the LearnVest and Chase Blueprint study, just 28% of women do, and 40% of men.)
Our New Year’s resolutions can vary across an endless array of categories—from finding love, making new friends, and moving to a new city to acquiring a new hobby or skill set. Among the most popular resolutions that people make involve job- and career-related goals. However, while making a New Year’s resolution for career change and success can be the beginning of a wonderful new chapter in our lives, it’s really just the first step.
From what I've seen as a dude, the women who are most successful are the ones who are competent, confident, and drama-free. The biggest mistake I've seen is women trying to imitate men. It's a mistake, because what a lot of people think "men" act like is usually not how the most successful men act. You've almost certainly got a massively better ability to read people than your male peers, better soft persuasion skills, and you look better. Be pleasant, be professional, and most of the younger guys wont' care. Can't speak for the older ones.
I'd have to agree with the above post. Don't act like a man. You're not , and it just looks weird. But that being said if you're super nice then you'd probably get taken advantage of, so for example, in an interview setting just be yourself. If you are super nice then you probably don't fit in the typical banking environment. After all, you don't want to land a job on the notion of you being someone completely different than you are. You will eventually get tired and want to quit becuase you can't stand to act like someone you're not.

Best Advice: “When I was younger finance sounded scary, but it really isn’t. You can have an interest in health care or technology and that translates into finance in some way. Consider your interest in one thing and see how it connects to finance. I was interested in technology and then saw how it connected to finance. That made it less scary. Fintech or financial technology is actually really exciting right now.”
The WII Summit seeks to bring together HBS alumni, industry professionals, and current MBAs for a day of open discussion about the current topics affecting the buy-side community. It is an unparalleled opportunity to meet and network with industry peers and senior women in an open forum and exchange perspectives on how to drive a successful career in investing.
One reason for women’s growing wealth is that far more of them are in well-paid work than before. In America, women’s rate of participation in the labour market rose from 34% in 1950 to 57% in 2016. Another is that women are inheriting wealth from husbands, who tend to be older and to have shorter lives, or from parents, who are more likely than previous generations to treat sons and daughters equally. As baby-boomers reach their sunset years, this transfer will speed up.

Do you need to hear that again? Nothing will make as big a difference in your retirement account balance as the amount you save. Even just adding an additional 1% can tip the scales significantly. A 35-year old earning $60,000 a year who puts an extra 1% (roughly $50 per month) into her retirement account will have an extra $3200 per year to live on in retirement (assuming a 7% rate of return and 1.5% raises.)
MS. KATZIFF: So, first and foremost, and we've covered this a lot, if you strengthen and support and enable women then what you're doing is strengthening communities and impacting positively the global economy. So, it all comes together, and you know, it's great because some of the efforts just have been great examples, even here the, you know, the last panel who talked about some of our efforts around, you know, Jill talked about the support we provide in via small business loans, our partnership with Tory Burch Foundation, which is providing affordable loans to women-owned businesses, our partnership with Vital Voices of course, and Cherie Blair Foundation, as well as again Jill and Josefina talked about the Supplier Diversity Program, which not only supports women but also supports businesses that are owned by minorities, individuals with disabilities, veterans, and the LGBT community. So, and we also, there's a whole host of things we do, but you know, another great example is we partner with the Institute for Economic Empowerment of Women and it's pieced through business training and mentoring program. And that is a program that helps and supports women entrepreneurs in Rwanda and Afghanistan to support and strengthen their businesses.
Who among us doesn’t want a loftier position with a more impressive sounding title and a higher salary, regardless of where we currently work? The truth is, this isn’t always an immediately attainable reality for everyone—maybe you’re just getting started at your current job and it’s too soon to start thinking about a promotion, or maybe the place you work at is small and there’s no clear upward trajectory. Whatever the reason, if you’re seeking a promotion and there’s no obvious path for growth for you in your current job, perhaps this means you should make a more drastic change as part of your New Year’s resolution planning.

Become a mentor. The study found that 45% of women report not having a financial role model. Closing the wealth gap could deeply benefit from inter-generational collaboration. While Millennials expressed the least amount of confidence in investing, members of the Boomer and Silent Generation cite higher confidence in investing. That knowledge could be a vital resource for Gen-Xers and Millennial women. Being able to learn from other women's experiences around financial planning and planning time out from the workforce can play a key role in creating effective strategies that keep family obligations from reducing earning potential and investment opportunities. The study found that 77% of women see money in terms of what it can do for themselves and their families. Women in the study stated that understanding their finances is key to greater career flexibility (84%). That flexibility, and sharing the wisdom around how to get smart on investing, can be key to closing the wealth and pay gap permanently.
In the meantime, FirstCapital is looking for an analyst. We have a very open, inclusive, collaborative culture, which I and my fellow directors have worked hard to establish and to foster. See the video here from some of my colleagues. Male or female, if you like what you do, but not the environment you are in, don't leave the industry, send me your CV!
In recent weeks, Knowledge@Wharton High School began noticing young women on the Wharton campus in Philadelphia, Pa., U.S., who were wearing hats and carrying bags inscribed with three simple words: Girls Who Invest. Since we happen to know lots of girls with this interest – thousands from around the world have participated in our annual KWHS Investment Competition for high school students – we decided to look further into this intriguing GWI sorority. Who were they? Why were they here? And were they truly stock market devotees?
Women continue to earn less than men. On average, full-time female workers in the U.S.make only 80 cents for every dollar earned by men in 2015, a gender wage gap of 20 percent. And the gap is even larger for women of color: Hispanic and Latina women were paid only 54 percent of what white men were paid in 2015, while African American women earned 63 percent that of their male counterparts.3 Consider the impact of that disparity over the course of 20 years. This wage gap becomes even more detrimental if you're a woman who happens to be the primary breadwinner in a male-dominated industry. You'll need to work quite a bit longer than your male co-workers to make up for the wage gap and generate adequate retirement savings.
Well, I think that it summarizes what I think about this topic. Maybe Wharton’s Investment Competition will have more girls participating if it adopt some measures, like maybe a “runner up prize”, with symbolic values, to the best girls team, or maybe a rule that teams with more than six participants need to have at least one girl (it won’t stop anyone to participate but would make the incentive between students for a higher participation of girls). But as I said, 27% is a number that makes me ate least optimistic, because it reveals that girls are interested in this field and are fighting for it too. Now we have to try to increase this percentage, and movements like Girls Who Invest take a key role on it.

Simply put, women don’t invest as much as men do. And they don’t invest as early as men do, either. Of all the assets women control—both inside and outside their portfolios—they keep a full 71% in cash, according to a survey by BlackRock, whereas men hold 60%. Cash may feel like zero risk, but it also has zero potential to grow as stocks do over time. And even with low inflation, the purchasing power of that cash will decline over time. So the price of certainty you get with cash is high.
Kiva Microfunds is a nonprofit organization and microloan tool allowing people to lend money to others in need around the world, starting at $25. It focuses on low-income entrepreneurs and students in over 80 countries, making it easy to seek out women and invest in their futures. The organization has a 97 percent loan repayment rate and a four-star rating from Charity Navigator. A higher-cost option is SheEO, a company that takes donations in the amount of $1,100 to support early women entrepreneurs and grow their businesses.
However, if you’re looking to save for retirement over the course of 20 or 30 years, an aggressive strategy is going to get you the best return possible. While aggressive markets tend to fluctuate widely in the short term, the overall market trends upward an average of 10% each year. When you can afford to be patient in the market (something women are proven to be better at than men), an aggressive strategy can definitely pay off in your favor.

VP Nancy Wilson worked in a variety of marketing and business development roles in the I.T. and telecom industries before joining the business development team at Allegiance Capital. Her life as an Air Force brat, in a family where she was the only girl with four brothers, helped shape her “extroverted, super-high-energy personality. I jump in feet first a lot.”

MS. TURLINGTON BURNS: Sixty percent of women here give birth at home without a skilled provider by their side. And one in 83 women die in childbirth. That's a staggering number. Every time I hear these statistics I realize how lucky I was when I gave birth to my daughter. After giving birth I started to hemorrhage. Without the skilled care of my midwife and nurses I could have died. I had no idea that women still die in childbirth. Once I knew, I had to do something about it. Just imagine, you're about to give birth and you have no ride to the hospital. So, you have to walk five, 10, even 20 miles to reach care. Then when you finally arrive you find there's no electricity, no doctor, no midwife, no nurse. More than 300 thousand women die in childbirth every year. That's one woman every two minutes, and almost all of them, 98%, are preventable. For these mothers, we can be a light in the darkness.
Move over millennials, here comes the IGen! Born between 1995 and 2005 this group of tech savvy natives is the next cohort and are just now entering the workforce. IGen, or Gen Z as they are often referred, have grown up in a world of social media where Youtube, Instagram, and Twitter reign supreme. These kids are a force to be reckoned with and require access to information in ways that are familiar, immediate, and actionable. Our success depends on them because as the IGen goes, so goes the manufacturing industry, the nation, and the world.
2. Most banker chicks I have met are hardcore nerds. They went to the best high schools in their respective countries. They are top 10% of their class. If they were here for their MBA, they went to top notch undergraduates either in the US or in their home countries. I haven't forgotten about American born Chinese (ABC). All of these banker chicks went to Ivy League.
No. In your early 20s, you’re just happy to have a job. I loved the markets and the trading floor atmosphere. As you get more senior, the pay disparity, the accounts being unequally distributed becomes more apparent. It bothered me. The little frat boy jokes stuff was a constant drumbeat. It didn’t get to me that much. As I got into my 30s, I was bothered more by seeing young women come who were talented and leave because of the environment.
The Wells Fargo/Gallup Investor and Retirement Optimism Index was conducted August 5–14, 2016, by telephone. The index includes 1,021 investors randomly selected from across the country with a margin of sampling error of +/- four percentage points. For this study, the American investor is defined as an adult in a household with total savings and investments of $10,000 or more. About two in five American households have at least $10,000 in savings and investments. The sample size is composed of 71 percent nonretirees and 29 percent retirees. Of total respondents, 43 percent reported annual income of less than $90,000; 57 percent reported $90,000 or more.
Investing money in the stock market is not a complicated process, but it requires making decisions. Will you buy funds, exchange traded funds or equities? If so, which ones — and in what proportion? And on which platform will you choose to hold your investments? These are the practical barriers, but bigger decisions are needed to guide these choices — namely, what am I saving for, and how can I do so in the most tax-efficient way?
From what I've seen as a dude, the women who are most successful are the ones who are competent, confident, and drama-free. The biggest mistake I've seen is women trying to imitate men. It's a mistake, because what a lot of people think "men" act like is usually not how the most successful men act. You've almost certainly got a massively better ability to read people than your male peers, better soft persuasion skills, and you look better. Be pleasant, be professional, and most of the younger guys wont' care. Can't speak for the older ones.
While anyone can attend the pitch competitions, only women of color can do the pitching. Bell is proud, she says, of “the women we serve and their reaction to the space created for them.” She is also proud of the success many of the entrepreneurs have found after working with BGV. Founders who have participated in pitch competitions have gone on to be accepted into accelerators, receive fellowships, and raise more capital from other resources.
#1... biggest advice to any female looking to break into finance... drop the feminista thing, it won't get you anywhere. It's ok to be bitchy, and in fact may help you in certain instances, but don't ever, ever pull the feminist card. There's nothing worse than a person who chalks up their own personal failings to an "anti-me" thing. It's nothing more than an excuse for being a slacker.

Thankfully, things have changed — but not everyone has gotten the message. Today you can invest online, from the comfort of your home, and if you do meet with an advisor, you’re going to see that everyone is trying to make things more accessible, Katchen says. “People know that women control more money than men, and are often the financial decision makers in their household.”


This material is not a recommendation to buy, sell, hold, or rollover any asset, adopt an investment strategy, retain a specific investment manager or use a particular account type. It does not take into account the specific investment objectives, tax and financial condition or particular needs of any specific person. Investors should work with their financial professional to discuss their specific situation.
Take on less risk. Women are more likely to have their savings allocated in a more age-based allocation of investments than their male counterparts. In fact, looking specifically at Fidelity retirement savings accounts over the last three years, the percentage of women allocated appropriately for their age has increased by approximately 40 percent. Furthermore, fewer women have their savings fully invested in equities than men (which could represent too much risk and not enough diversification); and women are more likely to invest in target date funds, ensuring they are well diversified.
3. Make communication a priority. Some women shut down when it comes to talking about investing because they find the jargon too confusing to understand. But Bast believes that’s your cue to talk more about the life and family issues that drive your investment decisions, not less. “Knowledge really is power, especially when it comes to investing. If your financial advisor isn’t speaking clearly and answering your questions in the way you need, let him or her know. The more you know about your money, the more confident you may feel about your future."

In a recent survey by Morgan Stanley 84% of women said they were interested in “sustainable” investing, that is, targeting not just financial returns but social or environmental goals. The figure for men was 67%. Matthew Patsky of Trillium Asset Management, a sustainable-investment firm, estimates that two-thirds of the firm’s direct clients who are investing as individuals are women. Among the couples who are joint clients, investing sustainably has typically been the wife’s idea. Julia Balandina Jaquier, an impact-investment adviser in Zurich, says that though women who inherit wealth are often less confident than men about how to invest it, when it comes to investing with a social impact “women are more often prepared to be the risk-takers and trailblazers.” 

The area where you might run into some issues is once you move up a bit. Not every guy reacts well by being told what to do by a woman. The best way to mitigate that isn't to do what some of my military peers did and react by trying to bark out harsh orders, since that usually comes across as being fairly obnoxious. A more pleasant and collaborative tone can go a long way...for most dudes as well.
Women make roughly 70% of household purchases, putting them in a great position to benefit from the strategy that once made Peter Lynch the best-known mutual fund manager on the planet. Lynch, who ran Fidelity Magellan (symbol FMAGX) from 1977 through 1990, said in his book One Up on Wall Street that investors’ best research tools are their own eyes and ears; he got many of his best investment ideas while walking around shopping malls and talking with his friends and family. In fact, Lynch wrote, his wife was responsible for turning him on to what turned out to be one of his best picks ever, Hanes Co., when she told him how much she liked L’eggs panty hose, which Hanes makes.
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