To be able to be transformational in that sector we need to work on four essential areas; one is policy, mostly dealing with issues of access to land, and to do that the public sector plays a big role. The second issue we try to tackle in the area of agriculture is access to finance. And like Nigest said for the longest time the women have been confined to microfinance and small loans. So, when we look at access to finance we want to look at the broad spectrum of financial instruments, whether it's a guarantee funds, credit lines, private equity, leasing of, you know, agriculture equipment. And all of that we have to do with the private sector. When we talk about access to market, same thing. How do we make sure that these women that we're going to help produce more tomatoes, more mangos, everything else, have access to market? And that access to market can only be achieved through contractual relationship with private sector. So, once UN Women walk away three or four years later from the program that these women are able to continue. And lastly, skills development, exactly what we've been doing this whole week. How do we make sure that these women are productive, they use technology, they have a better use of water? So, as you can see in all of these four pillars in the area of agriculture we cannot do it alone.
You’ve heard the stats that there are more CEOs named John in the U.S. than there are women CEOs? You don’t want to fall behind the Johns where you work, and that’s what will happen if your company isn’t willing to invest in you. Fortunately, you’re now armed with lots of bragging points and a great sense of the market value of what you do, which will help you seek out the next great opportunity and negotiate your new offers like a pro. 

This plays out in a number of different ways, explains Bast. “Some women save for their children’s college education before their own retirements. Others give generously to loved ones today, helping them to buy cars, houses and other large-ticket items.” However, Bast warns that there may be a high price to putting short-term needs in front of long-term goals.
“Today’s retirees tell us they are experiencing a very different retirement than non-retirees are envisioning,” said Levine. “With continuing savings challenges and potential economic uncertainties ahead, non-retirees should have a plan in place and regularly revisit it to make sure it still aligns with what’s most important to them for their retirement years.”
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So, if you’re eager to make a major job or career change… you guessed it, make a plan. Consider making a list of pros and cons for taking the plunge. If everything in your life is pointing to making a major change, figure out what new goal makes the most sense for you. Take an inventory of your skills and experience, along with your interests and aspirations, and figure out which careers/industries you best align with. Do you have any friends or family who have jobs that sound potentially intriguing to you? If so, ask them more about it. Do your research—the Internet is a great source of information for researching new companies and careers.
Making investing a habit—a bit out of every paycheck—is also smart and may be a means of further reducing risk. That’s because sometimes you may be “buying high,” and sometimes you may be “buying low.” But over time, these may even out…and reduce the time it can take for your portfolio to recover from any market downturn (since during the stock plunge, you’ll be “buying low”).

This is a great goal for most of us and can really help put you in a better position to achieve the other resolutions on this list in the future—getting a promotion or a new job, or even changing industries. And even if none of these goals are in your immediate future, acquiring new skills can be a rewarding and fulfilling enterprise on its own and help us feel more empowered and effective in our current positions.

Your goal, therefore, is to try to keep your emotions in check. Although there’s little direct data to suggest that women are less susceptible to market euphoria, they do seem a bit calmer during panics. The Vanguard Group looked at whether customers of its retirement plans were moving money out of stocks during 2008, when the U.S. market plunged 37%. Overall, the fund giant found, investors were fairly steadfast, but women were more so, proving to be 10% less likely to sell their stock holdings than men.


4. Collaborate on a plan. “The number one piece of advice I give to couples is to make all financial decisions together,” concludes Bast. “Building a financial plan with a partner and/or financial advisor gives you an opportunity to discuss your respective financial goals and helps you identify potential challenges that need to be addressed. It also enables you to sort through any differences and facilitates the creation of a solid roadmap for getting where you want to go. Best of all, joint accountability can be a powerful way to achieve financial success.”
Most families have one person that is in charge of the family’s finances, we want to change that. Together you have worked hard to raise a family, own a home and build a life, making all the big decisions together, though life’s joys and challenges, securing a financial future is a partnership too. Talking about money can be difficult for a variety of reasons mostly because men and women approach money differently. Women have sharp intuition when it comes to money; and by 2020, they are expected to control $22 trillion in assets. Ninety-five percent of women will be their family's primary financial decision maker at some point in their lives. When it comes to investing we want to encourage couples to get involved in the money conversation before a life changing event occurs.
Fidelity research among professional women across the country shows there's no shortage of interest in learning more about financial management and investment choices, with over 90 percent saying they want to learn more about financial planning8. For many, this stems from a need to play ‘catch up,' with a majority reporting a lack of opportunity to learn financial skills earlier in life. 

Since the early 2000s RobecoSAM, a sustainable-investment specialist that assesses thousands of public companies on environmental and social criteria, has included measures of gender equality, such as equitable pay and talent management. After realising that in the decade to 2014 firms that scored well on these measures had better returns than those scoring poorly, it launched a gender-equality fund in 2015. Since then it has outperformed the global large-cap benchmark.
I was partially being sarcastic. However, I think the comment probably holds some merit, as unfair as it may be. In addition, I don't think that it relates only to finance, but in business in general. I think from a hiring standpoint, for whatever reason, appearance absolutely can play a role in the decision-making process. I also think that, again for whatever reason, it probably plays a bigger role when the hiring decision pertains to a female.
2. In a team work, Woman are are worst performer, They are very good pal , sharing tiffin in canteen , going market along , but in case of official hiererchy, woman always want a man boss. I dont know what is the philosophy, but i seen, I felt- so I am writing. decision is in your hands. The result suffers due to poor co operation between the woman , and ultimately they blame to Glass Ceiling - that is not true.
My department is pretty much evenly split, so imbalance between men and women wasn't something I took into account when deciding whether or not to join the bank. Other departments may be slightly weighted one way or the other, but that shouldn't discourage anyone from pursuing a career in investment banking. If anything, it should give women more incentive to join the industry, make it more feminine and challenge the stereotype that investment banking is male-dominated. In my experience at J.P. Morgan, men and women are treated equally. I've never felt that I'm at a disadvantage because I'm a woman.
You also need to work harder sometimes in order to get recognition or get same bonuses. It might also be harder for you to find a mentor at workplace, but again you could solve those problems by working hard, finding mentors outside of workplace or developing mentorships slowly at work through developing your own brand and consistently proving that you are reliable.
I'd have to agree with the above post. Don't act like a man. You're not , and it just looks weird. But that being said if you're super nice then you'd probably get taken advantage of, so for example, in an interview setting just be yourself. If you are super nice then you probably don't fit in the typical banking environment. After all, you don't want to land a job on the notion of you being someone completely different than you are. You will eventually get tired and want to quit becuase you can't stand to act like someone you're not.
“It’s been great,” said Wall, a Seattle native, pointing to the Brown Bag Lunch Series — a series of lunchtime conversations with men and women from across the investment industry, including Notre Dame Vice President and CIO Scott Malpass — as a particular highlight. “I especially appreciated the sheer variety of practitioners across all asset classes that came and discussed their career paths.”
The most important thing you can do to change the investment gap is simple: Educate yourself. People who understand investing are less likely to be intimidated by it and more likely to do it. It’s not hard—you’re not trying to become a derivatives trader. You want to know whether you’re on the right financial track. Check out the articles on Investopedia or anything from Ron Lieber at The New York Times. (The one on how to win at retirement savings is great.)

Investment of capital makes the global economy run, every day. The U.S. would have struggled to create a national economy post World War II without money invested by asset management firms to build its highway infrastructure. Renewable energy sources such as solar and wind would not be a reality today, and in certain parts of the developing world, people would still be without clean drinking water if not for investment in water treatment facilities.
One senior woman at a European bank argued that the push to promote more women is itself problematic. "The senior men have now got a cover for promoting the younger women who flirt with them," she said. "They know they have to promote X number of women each year, so they look around and they promote the women who kiss up to them most instead of the women who are the most competent. It's the same as the old boys' network, with flirtation instead of familiarity."
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Top GWI Takeaway: “I’ve heard of the term junk bond before, but I couldn’t understand why anyone would invest in them. The word has such a negative connotation. I’ve learned that junk bonds are high-yield bonds. They have a high risk of default, but they have a high return and offer higher yields than bonds with higher credit ratings. And they can actually be valuable investments for some investors.”
MS. NELSON: All right. Katerina, I want to, I want to come back to you and some of what you were talking about about the power of mentoring and partnership, and also bring together a strand that Melanne was talking about earlier, the idea of needing networks, and how valuable networks are. And one of the things that we've found at Vital Voices, because ultimately what we are is a network of 15,000 women leaders around the world, across different sectors, as well as mentors and others, and what we've definitely seen is that there's something about women being part of a non-competitive and non-hierarchical network, that it encourages women leaders to take risks that they wouldn't have normally taken. Can you talk about, I mean did you have that experience? I mean I know you're sort of a risk-taker by design, as an entrepreneur you have to be. But I'm curious, I mean what's next for you and what has, what has been unleashed through gaining more support and mentoring?
While a nice portfolio of stocks is bliss, having financial independence is way bigger than picking the right stock, fund or financial advisor. It’s about living in a way that supports your financial goals, having the confidence and knowledge to grow your money (alone or with a well chosen financial advisor), and creating income streams using either your highest skills, your money, or both to fund the lifestyle you desire.
In recent weeks, Knowledge@Wharton High School began noticing young women on the Wharton campus in Philadelphia, Pa., U.S., who were wearing hats and carrying bags inscribed with three simple words: Girls Who Invest. Since we happen to know lots of girls with this interest – thousands from around the world have participated in our annual KWHS Investment Competition for high school students – we decided to look further into this intriguing GWI sorority. Who were they? Why were they here? And were they truly stock market devotees?
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Another reason why women may not be as aggressive as men when it comes to investing is because they are more conservative — they like to hang on to their cash, explains Cary Carbonaro, CFP and Managing Director of United Capital of NY and Author of the "Money Queen's Guide for Women Who Want to Build Wealth and Banish Fear". “When I tell my clients they should have an emergency fund, the men will tell me, ‘But I want my emergency fund in the market,’ and meanwhile the women will have five times the emergency fund they need, sitting in the bank, not doing anything. For some reason, women are afraid of losing money, while men seem to be afraid of losing out by not playing the market.”

Conventional wisdom “blames” women for this gap. We receive messages that we’re not as good at math as men; we’re not as good at investing. Um, no. Studies have found that once women do invest, they outperform men by nearly one percentage point a year. This was confirmed recently by Fidelity, which analyzed the performance of 8 million retail clients in 2016. Typically women outperform because they don’t overtrade, panic in down markets, or pay too much in fees.
The other reason you need to be investing for retirement is that even if you did save every dollar you needed, by the time you got to retirement, the value of money would have fallen and you’ll need more dollars in order to maintain the same standard of living you’d enjoyed previously. The reason for that? Inflation, which raises prices by, on average, 2% or 3% annually. That’s why a gallon of milk might have cost $0.35 when your grandmother was a child and why it now costs $3.50. Here is a visual representation of what inflation does to the value of money over time:
Don't put your investments on long-term autopilot. One of women's strengths as investors is that they are less tempted to buy and sell in the short term, based on classic research by Brad M. Barber and Terrance Odean at the University of California-Berkeley. But at least once a year, you need to become an active investor, checking your asset allocation as you age and your needs change. That means changing your asset allocation when it's required, or hiring an investment advisor or an online investment platform to do it for you. "This was my own mistake in 2008. ... I didn't have cash, and I was fairly close to retirement," said Hounsell.
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Younger men are far more likely to invest according to their values than their fathers were; 81% of millennial men in Morgan Stanley’s survey were interested in sustainable investing. And though fewer American men than women say they want to invest in companies with diverse leadership, the share is still sizeable, at 42%. If gender-lens investing is truly to take off, it will have to appeal to those who control the bulk of wealth—and that is still men.
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MS. TURLINGTON BURNS: It's a huge problem, and it's going to get worse. We have done a series of films called "Giving Birth in America" where we look through state-by-state at maternal healthcare. And one of the first films that we did was in Montana and there, you know, we had a family, a Caucasian family, highly educated, lots of kids, but that lived far away, just lived in a large state in a rural part of the state, and so when an emergency happened they were far away. I mean the woman survived, but it was, it was almost as if you could be in Sub-Saharan Africa and have the same problem. If you have a post-partum hemorrhage, you could bleed to death in under two hours if you don't get to care. So, you can see some of the same challenges as you do anywhere. I think what's most important is really having many levels of trained health providers, so community health workers, doulas, midwives, nurses, and doctors when necessary. Sometimes in the United States we have a tendency to over-medicalize birth, and so you might rush to a doctor who you don't necessarily need to see.
This material is not a recommendation to buy, sell, hold, or rollover any asset, adopt an investment strategy, retain a specific investment manager or use a particular account type. It does not take into account the specific investment objectives, tax and financial condition or particular needs of any specific person. Investors should work with their financial professional to discuss their specific situation.
The organization maintains that women investment managers in the U.S. in the $15 trillion mutual fund marketplace have fallen from 10% of the industry in 2009 to less than 7% today. In alternative asset classes, women represent 6% in private equity, 4% in real estate and 3% in hedge funds. The pipeline of young women moving into these types of careers is not promising, in part because they don’t understand the industry and they don’t have available role models.

MS. TURLINGTON BURNS: Well, they go hand-in-hand. I mean, no matter where I've traveled in the world, you know, that when a woman not only has opportunity, is able to go to school for longer, there is a correlation between, you know, her sexual debut, first child, marriage, all of those things, which impact her freedom. I find that, and you see it, and I think it was in the first film that came up that when a woman has economic independence, she's more likely to put those funds towards her family. She'll be more likely to take care, and seek care earlier than she would otherwise, and so, you just see the thoughtfulness that goes into that. And without it it's a lot harder, you know, If you don't have decision-making power, if you don't have, you know, you're literally waiting for someone else to make a decision whether your life is worth saving. So, no one should be in that position, and I think to have more opportunities and more equality—obviously a woman is going to be better off, and you're going to see the impact in her family and in her community more than you would otherwise.


Americans as a whole are drastically under-saved for retirement. According to a recent report by the Economic Policy Institute, nearly half of all families have no retirement-account savings at all.1 Women are disproportionately impacted by this shortfall for a number of reasons. Consider the socioeconomic factors that are creating obstacles for women in America today:
J.P. Morgan runs a recruitment programme called Winning Women, which gives female students the opportunity to discover the different areas of investment banking and learn about internships and the roles open to graduates. I recently participated in a networking event for the Winning Women programme, where I shared my experiences with students, and they also had the chance to meet female leaders from the bank and ask them questions about their careers.

But many still hesitate to reach out for help. Women across all generations are less likely to reach out to an adviser than men, with six out of 10 saying they have never consulted with a financial professional. Among this group, the top reason why was feeling like they didn't have enough money. Other barriers holding women back from addressing their finances: not knowing where to start and simply not making it a priority11.
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