While female bankers with husbands and children to support keep quiet for fear of seeming uncommitted to their roles, she said male bankers are more likely to make their familial responsibilities widely known: "I used to work with a man who would shout about how he had four kids at home every year when it came to making redundancies or allocating bonuses."

Consider a male slugger who puts $1,000 each into two speculative stocks versus a female lead-off hitter who invests the same amount in two dividend-paying blue-chip stocks. The high-quality stocks each return 10% over the course of the year, leaving the female investor with $2,200. Meanwhile, the male investor hits a home run with one of his picks, which doubles, but strikes out with the other, which loses 90% of its value. His total after a year is $2,100.


It’s real, and at the very least people are beginning to understand that the average woman makes between 78¢ and 80¢ for every $1 a man makes in the same job. To a woman earning $85,000 a year, that translates into lifetime costs of hundreds of thousands of dollars. The gap is not as bad for millennial women (at closer to 90¢), but it’s worse for women with disabilities (72¢), black women (63¢), and Latinas (54¢).
Simply put, women don’t invest as much as men do. And they don’t invest as early as men do, either. Of all the assets women control—both inside and outside their portfolios—they keep a full 71% in cash, according to a survey by BlackRock, whereas men hold 60%. Cash may feel like zero risk, but it also has zero potential to grow as stocks do over time. And even with low inflation, the purchasing power of that cash will decline over time. So the price of certainty you get with cash is high.
The content is developed from sources believed to be providing accurate information. The information in this material is not intended as tax or legal advice. Please consult legal or tax professionals for specific information regarding your individual situation. Some of this material was developed and produced by FMG Suite to provide information on a topic that may be of interest. FMG Suite is not affiliated with the named representative, broker - dealer, state - or SEC - registered investment advisory firm. The opinions expressed and material provided are for general information, and should not be considered a solicitation for the purchase or sale of any security.
Over the past three years, Fidelity has seen the number of women investing their money with the firm grow significantly—by 19 percent, to more than 12 million. "The good news is many women are putting themselves in the financial driver's seat, taking positive steps to save and invest effectively for their future," said Kathleen Murphy, president of personal investing at Fidelity. "But there are still many who need to do more. The reality is that saving alone is not enough to even keep pace with inflation, so if you're not investing, you're likely losing money. Taking the next step to ensure that savings are invested properly and generating growth is critical to helping women progress toward their financial goals and live the lives they deserve."

Women currently live longer than men. According to the World Health Organization, a female born in 2015 can expect to live nearly five years longer than a male born in the same year.2 The possibility that I may live longer means I have a greater chance of needing more income to sustain me through those extra years. And don't forget to factor in the medical expenses that will likely accompany an extended lifespan.
TFS Scholarships (TFS) is an independent service that provides free access to scholarship opportunities for aspiring and current undergraduate, graduate, and professional students. Founded in 1987, TFS began as a passion project to help students and has grown into the most comprehensive online resource for higher education funding. Today, TFS is a trusted place where students and families enjoy free access to more than 7 million scholarships representing more than $41 billion in college funding. In addition to its vast database that’s refreshed with 5,000 new scholarships every month, TFS also offers information about career planning, financial aid, and federal and private student loan programs as part of its commitment to helping students fund their future. Learn more at .tuitionfundingsources.com.
Some more interesting results have been released, in case you're interested in adding it to the list. A recently released PwC article highlights some of the issues women face in breaking into the financial services industry, the basic finding is while involving diverse groups improves business performance - so irrespective of an ethical case there is a business one - many women for instance, still find themselves sidelined with 60% saying financial services firms are not doing enough to encourage diversity.
“She was impressed with Notre Dame’s faculty and students, and also our classroom and residential facilities,” Scott said of Dunlap, who retired as CEO earlier this year. “Her time on campus allowed her to visualize how this program could be implemented here at ND and how we could be the host for their second site — increasing the number of students GWI serves through their summer intensive program to 100. Kathleen was thrilled that Carl Ackermann would serve as the lead faculty instructor — especially given that he regularly wins awards for excellence in teaching the sophomore-level introductory finance course. She was also excited to learn that we were planning to have many of our female faculty teach during the program, as these women are exceptional role models for the scholars.”  
Textbooks and school supplies. Course materials could eat up a large chunk of your budget. The average estimated cost of books and supplies for in-state students living on campus at public four-year institutions in 2016-2017 was $1,250, according to the College Board. Also plan for purchases like notebooks, a laptop, a printer and a backpack, and read the do’s and don’ts of back-to-school shopping for money-saving tips.
11. Statistics Canada, “Occupation - National Occupational Classification (NOC) 2016 (693A), Highest Certificate, Diploma or Degree (15), Labour Force Status (3), Age (13A) and Sex (3) for the Labour Force Aged 15 Years and Over in Private Households of Canada, Provinces and Territories, Census Metropolitan Areas and Census Agglomerations, 2016 Census - 25% Sample Data,” 2016 Census (2017).
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I was in ECM, not currently pursuing it. If you want a personal life, do S&T/AM/PB. Life in ECM might be better than M&A but hours are still very long when you’re working on deals(and you want to be working on as many deals as you can if you are really interested in ECM). You also need to fly around and originate deals as you progress in your career. You can learn a lot in ECM too though the exit opp in M&A is probably broader given the solid modeling skills you gain. In ECM, you work on a lot of pitch books and presentations but might not necessarily learn how to value companies properly. Work life balance? I think its tough in ECM
One senior woman at a European bank argued that the push to promote more women is itself problematic. "The senior men have now got a cover for promoting the younger women who flirt with them," she said. "They know they have to promote X number of women each year, so they look around and they promote the women who kiss up to them most instead of the women who are the most competent. It's the same as the old boys' network, with flirtation instead of familiarity."

MS. CALABRESE BAIN: Well, you know, it's interesting, and listening to Christy and listening to Josefina really struck a chord with me because often times what we see is that necessity is the mother of all invention, and women business owners generally speaking do not open their own businesses for the lure of financial success. That's low down on the totem pole for them, it's really about empowerment. Empowerment means different things to different people, whether it's a business owner is Southern Florida and she's opening indoor pools. And so, if you're from Southern Florida you know that indoor pools is not something that exists, but it's the leading cause of death for children. So, she developed indoor pools. And financing for her was not easy out of the gate, right? I also talked to a business owner, a not-for-profit business owner this week who started her own domestic violence association, and she didn't do it for her, she did it for her granddaughter. And so, when you think about why women create businesses, it's not always about themselves. It is about other people. But I think that there is, it is about community and community is not only local, it's national, it's global. You see what these women are doing. And I think we can do anything. So, it's about putting our voice out there, our resources, our network, our support, and really sponsoring versus mentoring. But really taking a stand and pulling people together, and saying, "You know what? No is not the answer for us."
Positive intent can be a powerful motivating force for change and growth in our lives, but the truth is that it’s often not enough—this is the reason why the majority of us fail to completely commit and follow through on the resolutions we make each year. The truth is, most resolutions flounder in the starting gate without any real forward progress ever being made, and many others are met with a feeble, half-hearted effort that eventually goes nowhere. We need more than a positive attitude and hope—we need a plan.
i am not too sure what red flags really mean here, but glad to see your mention of "vast majority", which means that there are still some fields out there that are more men dominant and that loops back to my original question. i did not, mind you, say, it is men dominant or both sexes being equal in IB. I simply asked the question to get some feedbacks.

“The GWI program is one of the programs that the institute is implementing to make more female students aware of the careers in investment management,” Mary Scott, associate director of the Notre Dame Institute for Global Investing (NDIGI), said of the program. “As we broaden awareness of how intellectually stimulating and rewarding these types of careers can be, our hope is that more females will be interested in pursuing this industry.”
Not even close. We ran some projections based on the wage gap, typical asset allocation strategies, and a gender-specific salary curve. The true cost for the average woman at the time she retires may run two to seven times that amount. Depending on your salary and the market’s performance, the real cost of the investing gap over a 35-year career span could be more than $1 million. Yes, I said a million.

Fidelity research among professional women across the country shows there's no shortage of interest in learning more about financial management and investment choices, with over 90 percent saying they want to learn more about financial planning8. For many, this stems from a need to play ‘catch up,' with a majority reporting a lack of opportunity to learn financial skills earlier in life.
Looking beyond investment banking, it is also worth pointing out that two of the most influential positions in the financial world are currently held by women, namely Christine Lagarde, head of the International Monetary Fund, and Janet Yellen, who in 2014 succeeded Ben Bernanke at the helm of the US Federal Reserve. These examples only go to prove that when women set their minds to a career in finance, absolutely no heights are unattainable.
Conventional wisdom “blames” women for this gap. We receive messages that we’re not as good at math as men; we’re not as good at investing. Um, no. Studies have found that once women do invest, they outperform men by nearly one percentage point a year. This was confirmed recently by Fidelity, which analyzed the performance of 8 million retail clients in 2016. Typically women outperform because they don’t overtrade, panic in down markets, or pay too much in fees.
The solution for this problem is exactly what you said, Diane: “Women need to see themselves in these roles, know they can develop the necessary skills…” and it applies not just to finances but to sciences in general. But, fortunately, brave girls navigated in this not-known sea, breaking into it and them showing the way to the others. Here in Brazil there is a community called Meninas Olimpicas (Olympic Girls) which tries to correct this boys majority in the Scientific Olympiads by incentivizing girls to participate “head on” of them. In order of accomplishing this mission, they post depositions of girls who achieved great success in these competitions.
i simply asked a question inviting others with more experiences to share theirs, and i must say, if one day i supervise this bunch, most will be fired. why? if bother to write, write something that is representative of you and your being. if that is the case, i must say, this IB field if represented here is really not that competitive in the positive sense. rather, quite trivial. no offense, but if one can read, one shall understand.
The stubborn refusal of the gender pay gap to close, or even narrow, is a constant source of frustration for anyone who cares about equality between the sexes. That’s to say nothing of the void separating women and men when it comes to, for example, the number holding senior positions, the rates of promotion or representation in industries like tech. There is, however, one gap that is steadily closing. Women are getting richer.
Thankfully, things have changed — but not everyone has gotten the message. Today you can invest online, from the comfort of your home, and if you do meet with an advisor, you’re going to see that everyone is trying to make things more accessible, Katchen says. “People know that women control more money than men, and are often the financial decision makers in their household.”

Most women don’t think they know enough about investing to properly grow their savings; therefore, they wait to start investing until they feel they’re more financially stable and believe they can risk the possibility of losing money. A common misconception around investing is that you have to be an expert in the industry to succeed when the reality is that there are so many tools and resources that make easy to start investing with as little as your pocket change.
“TFS Scholarships was inspired by my own father’s experience as an inner-city high school principal, and grew out of the realization that more could be done to support students searching for college scholarships,” said Richard Sorensen, president of TFS Scholarships. “For more than 30 years, TFS has helped students achieve their higher education aspirations by making it easier to find essential funding for college.”

By Meghan Flaherty Women did not feel comfortable transacting with JazzCash’ mostly-male agent network, leading to lower product uptake. Women’s World Banking worked with Jazz to partner with Unilever’s women entrepreneur training program to leverage each companies core competencies to increase value for their products and drive financial inclusion for low-income women in Pakistan. At first […]


From what I've seen as a dude, the women who are most successful are the ones who are competent, confident, and drama-free. The biggest mistake I've seen is women trying to imitate men. It's a mistake, because what a lot of people think "men" act like is usually not how the most successful men act. You've almost certainly got a massively better ability to read people than your male peers, better soft persuasion skills, and you look better. Be pleasant, be professional, and most of the younger guys wont' care. Can't speak for the older ones.

Ment Make Management

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