You also need to work harder sometimes in order to get recognition or get same bonuses. It might also be harder for you to find a mentor at workplace, but again you could solve those problems by working hard, finding mentors outside of workplace or developing mentorships slowly at work through developing your own brand and consistently proving that you are reliable.
Find an advisor you like and/or trust enough to use. One reason that women might be checked out of investing is that they don't like their financial advisors. One sign of this, said Krawcheck, is that if the male half of a couple dies, the women leave their joint financial advisor at a rate of 70 percent. Her advice: Meet as many times with an advisor as you need to — even if that is five or six meetings. But if you don't feel comfortable, move along.
“TFS Scholarships was inspired by my own father’s experience as an inner-city high school principal, and grew out of the realization that more could be done to support students searching for college scholarships,” said Richard Sorensen, president of TFS Scholarships. “For more than 30 years, TFS has helped students achieve their higher education aspirations by making it easier to find essential funding for college.”

Figuring out how much you should invest vs. set aside in a short-term savings account comes down to how much risk you’re willing to undertake. Year over year, the market has been steadily rising, but that doesn’t mean that a return is guaranteed. The golden rule is to never invest more than you’re willing to lose, especially if you’re going after aggressive or volatile markets.
While female bankers with husbands and children to support keep quiet for fear of seeming uncommitted to their roles, she said male bankers are more likely to make their familial responsibilities widely known: "I used to work with a man who would shout about how he had four kids at home every year when it came to making redundancies or allocating bonuses."
Saul M. Simon, a certified financial planner with Simon Financial Group in Edison, N.J., recommends women investors start investing at work in their 401(k) or 403(b) retirement plans. Every dollar that goes into these plans reduces current income taxes. In addition, the money grows tax-deferred, and in many cases the employer matches a portion of your investment.
Coming in, I expected that my colleagues would be ultra-Type A, all work/no play, super serious folks given the nature of our work. But I’ve been pleasantly surprised by the great relationships and friendships I’ve developed at work and the camaraderie on our floor. I also expected the job to be extremely difficult in terms of the learning curve and was worried about my ability to handle it. It certainly is challenging, but with the support of my colleagues and mentors, I can really map out how much I’ve grown and learned over the past year. Everyone wants each other to succeed.
If you’re looking for a way to automate your own investment strategy or want to start investing on a small-scale without using a broker or firm, an investment app might be the right platform for you. If you type in “investment apps” in the app store search tool, hundreds of options will pull up, but not all will help you grow your savings to hit a solid return.
Setting aside popular wisdom to focus on the math, studies of gender differences in investment behavior consistently show that, in the long term, female investors consistently outperform men. This difference in performance is most notable when markets are bad. Why did women fare better? They took less risk; they worried more about losses; they traded less and earned more.
Fidelity research among professional women across the country shows there's no shortage of interest in learning more about financial management and investment choices, with over 90 percent saying they want to learn more about financial planning8. For many, this stems from a need to play ‘catch up,' with a majority reporting a lack of opportunity to learn financial skills earlier in life.
So how do women break the investment barrier in ways that can lead to lifelong financial independence? Sabbia has three key suggestions: learn the basics, define your goals, and invest in yourself. For more advanced investors, Sabbia suggests being a mentor that can help break the silence around talking about money. Doing so could accelerate the close of that wealth gap for all women. Let's examine each recommendation in closer detail.
Our New Year’s resolutions can vary across an endless array of categories—from finding love, making new friends, and moving to a new city to acquiring a new hobby or skill set. Among the most popular resolutions that people make involve job- and career-related goals. However, while making a New Year’s resolution for career change and success can be the beginning of a wonderful new chapter in our lives, it’s really just the first step.

Define your goals: Get to the heart of what's important to you by thinking critically about investment goals. Sabbia mentioned preparing for personal retirement, saving for children's educational needs, or leaving a charitable gift for the next generation as potential goals. She also mentioned a key difference in how women invest. "While women care about performance, they also look for their investments to align with their values, goals and priorities," Sabbia said. "In fact, more than half of women investors are interested in or engaged in impact investing, generating financial returns along with social returns." Sabbia mentions that whether it's for your own family or a meaningful cause to help others, having clear goals that link to a clear strategy is key to success. And the ripple effect from that empowerment could extend far beyond your own backyard. Increased participation in investing could benefit communities overall. "If more women can actively take control of their financial future all along the way, it would not only benefit them, but also their families and our society overall,” said Maddy Dychtwald, co-founder and senior vice president of Age Wave.
Despite the attractiveness of the competitive story pitting men versus women in a contest of investment prowess, the difference in their returns is not dramatic. For example, a study in the The Quarterly Journal of Economics reported that "Trading reduces men's net returns by 2.65 percentage points a year as opposed to 1.72 percentage points for women." Clearly, like beating an index, the difference between success and failure is generally a game of inches, not miles. With that in mind, every penny counts, and pennies paid out in fees are pennies that are not working on your behalf. Over the long-term, lower fees can make the difference between a few extra dollars in your wallet or a few dollars that you do not get to take home.
KWHS set out to meet some of this summer’s Girls Who Invest scholars to find out about their interest in the financial industry and some of their most valuable lessons from the four weeks they spent learning about finance at Wharton. As part of the program, all of the girls are now working in a six-week paid finance-related internships. The hope is that they continue to engage with their Girls Who Invest network as they build their careers and ultimately boost the number of women in top finance positions. “To me, the combination of women and finance and education is just one of the most powerful on the globe,” observed Cowell. “We’ve seen study after study. If women can manage their own money, then families are better, violence is reduced, nutrition goes up…if more women manage money at portfolios, you see greater diversity of hiring, more optimization of portfolio returns. It’s a better outcome with so many collateral benefits. There’s certainly an intellectual understanding that diversity of thought in all its forms, including gender, is a good thing for business. Getting to the result is harder.”
Well, the vision that people in general have about this market is one of a bunch of heartless, greed peolpe seeking more and more proft, in order to get richer. But it’s not like this. Of course, it’s in some e way about “making” money, yet it can be done without damaging people and can be used to generate good for the world. To train the future business leaders to know the imortance of it, and to select people using as a criteria their will to help the world, making it a better place, is a way to reinforce this perspective.
But many still hesitate to reach out for help. Women across all generations are less likely to reach out to an adviser than men, with six out of 10 saying they have never consulted with a financial professional. Among this group, the top reason why was feeling like they didn't have enough money. Other barriers holding women back from addressing their finances: not knowing where to start and simply not making it a priority11.
Don't put your investments on long-term autopilot. One of women's strengths as investors is that they are less tempted to buy and sell in the short term, based on classic research by Brad M. Barber and Terrance Odean at the University of California-Berkeley. But at least once a year, you need to become an active investor, checking your asset allocation as you age and your needs change. That means changing your asset allocation when it's required, or hiring an investment advisor or an online investment platform to do it for you. "This was my own mistake in 2008. ... I didn't have cash, and I was fairly close to retirement," said Hounsell.
Consider the guidance of a professional advisor. If thinking about saving for retirement overwhelms you, consider working with an advisor to help you set goals and make informed investment decisions. Seek recommendations from friends, or gather a group of friends together to interview potential advisors. Meeting with multiple advisors before making a decision will help ensure you find someone who is the right fit for your needs.
Take a step to educate yourself. Countless blogs and websites provide accessible, engaging content to help increase your financial knowledge, including the Financial Freedom Studio, Jackson Charitable Foundation and many more. Just Google "retirement planning" or "financial education" and you'll see my point. I'm probably dating myself, but you could also go to the good ol' fashioned library or a bookstore to get this kind of information. For younger women just getting started, Learnvest.com can be a great resource, too.
But anyway, so I think the first thing is we have to say that is our expectation. It's our expectation that, you know, nearly everybody, 70% of the jobs in this state damn near are going to require post-secondary education, not necessarily a baccalaureate degree, but at least two years of education with a credential after high school, an associate's degree, some kind of stackable credential, a skill. Certainly the jobs at this organization are, certainly the jobs that you all are creating as entrepreneurs and leaders require skill and knowledge.
The reluctance to invest outside of company plans may be related to women’s lack of confidence in their investing abilities, which can make them prone to procrastination. “Women hold back because they think they need to know everything before they invest,” says Alexandra Lebenthal, chief executive of Lebenthal & Co., a New York City money-management company. Krawcheck agrees, saying that wanting to know more before getting started can be a trap. “There’s always a desire to know more. But if you wait, it just gets harder,” she says.
Another consideration that I see as a barrier to the advancement of women in investment banking is the need to balance the strenuous lifestyle with raising a family. I see some senior women go through this and it just seems so tough, with a lot of sacrifices having to be made to make it work. Certainly a personal decision as to whether these trade-offs are worth it, but I can confidently say that my firm is making a positive effort to retaining women.
“I listen to 20 hours of customer calls every month,” says Murphy. “Young people call and they’re trying to figure out what to do with their the money.” The answer – she says – is basic asset allocation often accomplished by putting with the help of a target date fund. “When things get more complicated they probably will want a financial advisor. But [at the start] let’s demystify it and if there is a simple investment solution focus on that. Betterment Data Scientist Sam Swift agrees. “We encourage people to be as passive as possible,” he says.
You should not have any credit card debt. This means you pay off your credit card balances in full every month. Why credit card debt in particular? Because if you aren’t paying that off every month, you aren’t making enough to support your basic living expenses. Once you get a budget that keeps you out of the red on a monthly basis (excluding debt like student or car loans), then you can start thinking about investing. (If you have credit card debt, try our Get Out of Debt Bootcamp.)
For example, take the key values that underpin success at MUFG. Vanessa shed light on them: ‘They are partnership and accountability (working in a team and taking responsibility for your contribution both as an individual and as part of the group), innovation (coming up with and implementing new ideas), integrity (how would you behave if it was your grandmother?), and urgency (taking action in a timely manner).’
Every investor makes mistakes. Sometimes it is an error of commission: You buy a real stinker. Sometimes it is an error of omission: You hang onto a loser, or a winner, for too long. But knowing what and when to sell is at least as important as knowing what to buy. “You have to know when to pull the plug,” says Sarah Ketterer, chief executive of Causeway Capital Management and the longtime comanager of her firm’s flagship fund, Causeway International Value (CIVVX).
To keep from acting impulsively, Kaplan suggests writing a script that outlines how you will react to a plunge or a rapidly rising market. Following that plan—-be it reading from an investment policy statement that you’ve prepared for yourself or simply calling your adviser—-should help you in both booms and busts, tempering the inclination to invest the rent money in stocks during run-ups and to bail out of the market with money you might not need for 30 years.
Do what you can to learn about investing now, because estimates show that women control 51 percent of wealth in the U.S. and are projected to control two-thirds by 2020, according to a Fidelity study. Yet women are more likely to say that "lack of investing knowledge or experience" and "too much information, or complexity of investing" are reasons they feel less confident, according to a Capital One investing survey. Consider taking an online investing course, downloading a podcast or wading through a book. (Warren Buffett's favorite is "The Intelligent Investor.")
“It is important to broaden the students’ awareness of the various career paths to help them understand the magnitude of opportunities beyond investment banking,” Scott said. “Ultimately, we hope that all our students build on the skills they learn in the classroom and in their first destination jobs to find their area of interest. We regularly talk to the students about their careers being a marathon, with many pivots, twists and turns. It is not a sprint.”

MS. CALABRESE BAIN: Well, you know, it's interesting, and listening to Christy and listening to Josefina really struck a chord with me because often times what we see is that necessity is the mother of all invention, and women business owners generally speaking do not open their own businesses for the lure of financial success. That's low down on the totem pole for them, it's really about empowerment. Empowerment means different things to different people, whether it's a business owner is Southern Florida and she's opening indoor pools. And so, if you're from Southern Florida you know that indoor pools is not something that exists, but it's the leading cause of death for children. So, she developed indoor pools. And financing for her was not easy out of the gate, right? I also talked to a business owner, a not-for-profit business owner this week who started her own domestic violence association, and she didn't do it for her, she did it for her granddaughter. And so, when you think about why women create businesses, it's not always about themselves. It is about other people. But I think that there is, it is about community and community is not only local, it's national, it's global. You see what these women are doing. And I think we can do anything. So, it's about putting our voice out there, our resources, our network, our support, and really sponsoring versus mentoring. But really taking a stand and pulling people together, and saying, "You know what? No is not the answer for us."
“My biggest advice to women who want to save more money is to make more money,” said financial expert Nicole Lapin, the winner of GOBankingRates.com’s 2015 Best Money Expert competition. “When you stop looking at your financial life as something of deprivation and more of something as aspiration, that’s when you actually feel comfortable of taking control of your own finances.”
Be judicious about reporting it. If it happens during an on-campus interview, talk to your college career office. They’ll determine how to address it with the company and can anonymize their report. It’s harder to report harassment if it happens at an informal event and you’re not an employee of the firm. As much as I hate to let guys get away with this behavior, you may have to let it go for the time being if that’s the case. Calling the firm to report him runs the risk of branding you as a potential liability – but you can tell other women in your network about it so they know to watch out.
Says Bourke, “In the first part of 2014, we completed four oil and gas deals totaling $350 million. We found, even in the heart of the oil patch, traditionally known as a male dominated industry, it is more the exception than the rule that both the decision to sell as well as the selection of the most appropriate buyer was a joint decision involving a central female stakeholder. It makes business sense to direct deliberate attention to building an investment banking firm that leverages the talent and experience of the female workforce.”

Be judicious about reporting it. If it happens during an on-campus interview, talk to your college career office. They’ll determine how to address it with the company and can anonymize their report. It’s harder to report harassment if it happens at an informal event and you’re not an employee of the firm. As much as I hate to let guys get away with this behavior, you may have to let it go for the time being if that’s the case. Calling the firm to report him runs the risk of branding you as a potential liability – but you can tell other women in your network about it so they know to watch out.
Moreover, the evidence suggests that your team will be stronger if it consists of both men and women. A 2011 Harvard Business Review study discovered that single-gender teams were less effective at problem solving than mixed groups. The Barber-Odean study found that married men performed better than single men in the stock market and concluded that this was likely due to a spouse’s influence. “When you ask if men or women are the better investors, you’re asking the wrong question,” says Suzanne Duncan, global head of research at the State Street Center for Applied Research, a think tank sponsored by the big financial-services firm. “We are better together. Men and women should have an equal voice in the investment process.”
Against this backdrop, countless talented female bankers have emerged in positions of power and influence in the last ten years, and contributed to the region's thriving status. Going by the strong network of up and coming female financiers, women will continue their march on high finance in Asia. finews.asia names the region's top twelve most influential female bankers.
I come from a completely non-traditional background when I was applying but ended up getting in the industry anyways. After you get in, at the junior level, hard work, have a good attitude/personality, motivation, adaptable and being smart at work (like let other ppl know you did the work..) will get you ahead, not if you are a girl or boy or loud mouth or not.
Consider a male slugger who puts $1,000 each into two speculative stocks versus a female lead-off hitter who invests the same amount in two dividend-paying blue-chip stocks. The high-quality stocks each return 10% over the course of the year, leaving the female investor with $2,200. Meanwhile, the male investor hits a home run with one of his picks, which doubles, but strikes out with the other, which loses 90% of its value. His total after a year is $2,100.
At the outset, The Man and Woman has wide difference in structure of their Brain, so their thinking line differs. The Man has two hemisphers and the nerves are concentrated in the hemisphere itself, interconnecting nerve between two is less. On the other hand , in case of Woman has interconnected nerves between the two hemishere are more, virtually it is one brain, and concentrate better, but only in one matter at a time. The Man can think more diverse at a given time.
Whether or not the results are predetermined by biology, the investment approach favored by the fairer gender is a time-tested, traditional approach to investing often referred to as "buy and hold." The strategy is simple: Investors identify a promising investment, purchase it and hold it for a long period of time, regardless of short-term market conditions.
Given how un-fun paying taxes is, you can imagine that everyone would store all their extra money in retirement accounts if they could. But of course, the government doesn’t allow that. It limits the amount of money you can put in retirement accounts. For instance, in 2012, you can only contribute $17,000 to a 401(k) or 403(b) account (though that will be bumped up to $17,500 for 2013). Similarly, you can only put $5,000 into an IRA in 2012 (and $5,500 in 2013).
Investing is not some get-rich-quick scheme and there is always a degree of risk. But those women who are comfortable with that risk should not be deterred by the aggressive macho investor stereotype. The proof of the increasing success of women in the world of investing can be seen in the female-focused investment firms that have sprung up. As Alexander Taussig, the senior vice president for women investors at Fidelity, has said, "The myth that men are better investors is just that -- a myth."
But just having a big shiny goal doesn’t qualify you to open an investment account just yet. After all, if the only thing you needed to have in order to start investing was the desire to have more money, then a lot more people would have investment accounts. (According to the LearnVest and Chase Blueprint study, just 28% of women do, and 40% of men.)
Perhaps you’re just not feeling completely happy or fulfilled in your current industry, and something is telling you that perhaps now is the time to make a major change. This could be a good thing—the truth is, job unhappiness is often a major cause of mental and physical distress and could have a wide range of negative effects on our health and well-being.
MS. CHRISTY TURLINGTON BURNS: Here in Haiti many women have to walk an average of five miles just to receive any kind of maternal healthcare. During my last trip here we were bouncing along the road, and I thought "Hey, why don't we run this? Why don't we run or walk this? Let's see what this really feels like." At Every Mother Counts we run as a way of educating the public about how distance is a barrier for women to access quality maternity care.
Simply put, women don’t invest as much as men do. And they don’t invest as early as men do, either. Of all the assets women control—both inside and outside their portfolios—they keep a full 71% in cash, according to a survey by BlackRock, whereas men hold 60%. Cash may feel like zero risk, but it also has zero potential to grow as stocks do over time. And even with low inflation, the purchasing power of that cash will decline over time. So the price of certainty you get with cash is high. 

Not even close. We ran some projections based on the wage gap, typical asset allocation strategies, and a gender-specific salary curve. The true cost for the average woman at the time she retires may run two to seven times that amount. Depending on your salary and the market’s performance, the real cost of the investing gap over a 35-year career span could be more than $1 million. Yes, I said a million.
FAFSA and taxes. Whether a parent or guardian claims you as a dependent or you file taxes on your own determines whose information is required to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, and who can claim tax credits and deductions. Discuss your financial status before each school year and address any changes, like a raise or job loss.
Not only are these items expensive, but political currents in many industrialized nations are reducing the contribution government makes toward these items. Decisions in corporate America are going the same way, as employers and insurance providers offer more expensive and less comprehensive coverage. All of these trends can result in higher expenses for the elderly, as they are forced to pay increased copayments, higher premiums and increased out-of-pocket expenses.
It’s a phenomenon some money experts call “the female financial paradox”: Women are a growing economic force, expected to add $6 trillion in earned income globally over the next five years, according to new research by The Boston Consulting Group released in 2013. Yet many women lag behind men when it comes to using those assets to plan and build financial security for the future.
If you’re looking to acquire new job skills in the new year, consider the following. Do you want to acquire skills that will make you more effective at your current job or a new one? Your answer to this question will help you determine which skills you should look at. Also, are you looking to invest money towards acquiring new skills? If so, there are a wealth of career and adult education/skill-development programs available across the country; a great place to start is researching the offerings at colleges and universities in your area. You’ll likely come across a wealth of options, both in class and online—you just need to decide which are right for you.
As president of the Atlanta Fed, Bostic leads one of the 12 regional Reserve Banks that, with the Board of Governors, make up the Federal Reserve System, the nation’s central bank. The Atlanta Fed is responsible for the Sixth Federal Reserve District, which encompasses Alabama, Florida, and Georgia and portions of Louisiana, Mississippi, and Tennessee. As its key functions, the Atlanta Fed participates in setting national monetary policy, supervises numerous banking organizations, and provides a variety of payment services to financial institutions and the U.S. government. Bostic has overall responsibility for these functions and represents the Sixth Federal Reserve District at meetings of the Federal Open Market Committee, the policymaking body within the Federal Reserve that sets monetary policy for the nation.
Nothing on this website should be considered an offer, solicitation of an offer, or advice to buy or sell securities. Past performance is no guarantee of future results. Any historical returns, expected returns or probability projections are hypothetical in nature and may not reflect actual future performance. Account holdings are for illustrative purposes only and are not investment recommendations. The content on this website is for informational purposes only and does not constitute a complete description of Stash’s investment advisory services. Certain investments are not suitable for all investors and are not available to all Stash Clients. Stash does not provide comprehensive financial planning services to individual investors. Before investing, consider your investment objectives and Stash’s fees and applicable custodial fees.
Every investor makes mistakes. Sometimes it is an error of commission: You buy a real stinker. Sometimes it is an error of omission: You hang onto a loser, or a winner, for too long. But knowing what and when to sell is at least as important as knowing what to buy. “You have to know when to pull the plug,” says Sarah Ketterer, chief executive of Causeway Capital Management and the longtime comanager of her firm’s flagship fund, Causeway International Value (CIVVX).
Starting early is important. Diversifying is just as important. Here’s a good definition of diversification. If you don’t want to read it, I’ll give you snapshot: Being diversified means that you are have your money in a lot of different types of investments—bonds, stocks, companies in established markets, companies in emerging markets, companies in different sectors, etc. The purpose of being diversified is that when one part of the market goes down—stocks, for instance—others may go up or go down less. The purpose is to protect yourself against catastrophe.
In a sign of their higher risk aversion, 90 percent of female Millennials said they held cash assets, such as money market funds or certificates of deposit (CDs). While these savings vehicles guarantee you'll get your money back, the returns are slight. The average nationwide money market account yields just 0.18 percent, and a one-year CD pays 2.21 percent in interest, according to Bankrate.com. Those modest returns compare with a 4 percent gain for the broad stock market this year and a nearly 20 percent gain in 2017.

The Wells Fargo/Gallup Investor and Retirement Optimism Index was conducted August 5–14, 2016, by telephone. The index includes 1,021 investors randomly selected from across the country with a margin of sampling error of +/- four percentage points. For this study, the American investor is defined as an adult in a household with total savings and investments of $10,000 or more. About two in five American households have at least $10,000 in savings and investments. The sample size is composed of 71 percent nonretirees and 29 percent retirees. Of total respondents, 43 percent reported annual income of less than $90,000; 57 percent reported $90,000 or more.
What I think that Cowell meant by the second part – that “getting to the result is harder” – is that the argument she poses is mostly true in theory; studies have indeed shown that diversity of hiring increases welfare, and specific to the asset management industry, portfolio returns. However, we have not seen enough industries and businesses having taken action towards this- which makes it hard to get to the “result”. Moreover, more diversity means more diverse opinions too, which might make it hard to reach decisions. This obstacle is natural, and its difficulty will depend on the temperaments of the people involved as well as the company’s culture.

Annuities are issued by Jackson National Life Insurance Company (Home Office: Lansing, Michigan) and in New York, annuities are issued by Jackson National Life Insurance Company of New York (Home Office: Purchase, New York). Variable products are distributed by Jackson National Life Distributors LLC. May not be available in all states and state variations may apply. These products have limitations and restrictions. Contact the Company for more information.
It also may make sense to refinance your mortgage, if you can lower the interest rate on your home loan enough for it to be worth the upfront cost and the time suck it can take. Usually it’s only worth exploring if you plan to stay in your house long enough to pay off the fees from the new loan and you can get a rate at least 1% to 2% lower. (Refinancing is something to look into right now, by the way, before interest rates go up again.)
The information in this report was prepared by the Global Investment Strategy (GIS) division of WFII. Opinions represent GIS’ opinion as of the date of this report, are for general informational purposes only, and are not intended to predict or guarantee the future performance of any individual security, market sector, or the markets generally. GIS does not undertake to advise you of any change in its opinions or the information contained in this report. Wells Fargo & Company affiliates may issue reports or have opinions that are inconsistent with, and reach different conclusions from, this report.
Nearly two-thirds of women polled say females are less likely than males to reach leadership roles. Only 56 percent of men and 37 percent of women agree that males and females are equally likely to become leaders in their industry. What's holding women back? Almost no one says the biggest obstacle is women opting out of leadership positions. Rather, it comes down to how quickly employees are promoted. Fewer than half of women (47 percent) felt that “men and women are promoted at an equal rate at their companies," and 26 percent of men also identified this gap.
Free tools designed for women. Fidelity.com/itstime was designed to provide insights and next steps around the life events that matter most to women, whether you're about to get married, changing careers or caring for aging parents. Available here are talks and workshops, articles, checklists, and other guidance targeted to help navigate financial challenges.
Formally known as Billguard, this financial planning app not only helps you create a budget, but they have a swipe-left, swipe-right feature where users can verify which of their expenses are theirs and which aren’t. Their specialty? Protecting their users from identity theft (more on this later). Features also includes helping users track their credit score. They also have Credit Card Optimizer feature, where users can track all of their credit card info, and helps users make better financial decisions with their credit cards. They also have a blog to keep you informed on all Prosper Daily’s updates along with useful financial tips.
MS. CRONSTEDT: So, I, a year after participating in the program, sold my first business and simultaneously, I started a new one based on the knowledge and the tools that were given to me in the Global Ambassadors Program, which was a more successful company, just in short. Which was an online catering company that exists to this day, and that has--

While millennials are taking a goal-oriented approach toward their retirement, they align with Americans overall in thinking they could be more proactive. Nearly half (48 percent) of Americans say they are most insecure about some aspect of their finances (financial future, retirement savings or income), with retirement savings (21 percent) being one of their top insecurities, ahead of their personal relationships (10 percent), judgment of others (6 percent) and career path (4 percent).


Conventional wisdom “blames” women for this gap. We receive messages that we’re not as good at math as men; we’re not as good at investing. Um, no. Studies have found that once women do invest, they outperform men by nearly one percentage point a year. This was confirmed recently by Fidelity, which analyzed the performance of 8 million retail clients in 2016. Typically women outperform because they don’t overtrade, panic in down markets, or pay too much in fees.


Be judicious about reporting it. If it happens during an on-campus interview, talk to your college career office. They’ll determine how to address it with the company and can anonymize their report. It’s harder to report harassment if it happens at an informal event and you’re not an employee of the firm. As much as I hate to let guys get away with this behavior, you may have to let it go for the time being if that’s the case. Calling the firm to report him runs the risk of branding you as a potential liability – but you can tell other women in your network about it so they know to watch out.
MS. SARR: We bring in money in terms of funding as the United Nations, but we expect private sector to play its role. We expect public sector to play its role. In Africa, right now we have two countries that are leading in terms of affirmative procurement. In Kenya for instance 30% of public spend is earmarked for women, youth, and people with disabilities. South Africa also has preferential treatment for women. So, it's those critical partnerships that will allow us to have that critical mass of women that are economically empowered. And as a UN we, especially when women, we have a good understanding of what we call the gender machinery. We play a role of honest broker and that's how we put it together. It's a, it's a holistic comprehensive approach to be able to have impact.

“She was impressed with Notre Dame’s faculty and students, and also our classroom and residential facilities,” Scott said of Dunlap, who retired as CEO earlier this year. “Her time on campus allowed her to visualize how this program could be implemented here at ND and how we could be the host for their second site — increasing the number of students GWI serves through their summer intensive program to 100. Kathleen was thrilled that Carl Ackermann would serve as the lead faculty instructor — especially given that he regularly wins awards for excellence in teaching the sophomore-level introductory finance course. She was also excited to learn that we were planning to have many of our female faculty teach during the program, as these women are exceptional role models for the scholars.”  


Younger men are far more likely to invest according to their values than their fathers were; 81% of millennial men in Morgan Stanley’s survey were interested in sustainable investing. And though fewer American men than women say they want to invest in companies with diverse leadership, the share is still sizeable, at 42%. If gender-lens investing is truly to take off, it will have to appeal to those who control the bulk of wealth—and that is still men.
Learn the basics: Sabbia mentions that the easiest first step is to simply expose yourself to trusted financial resources and education. This approach can be crucial to gradually bridging that confidence gap for women. "Whether it be conducting personal research, enrolling in an online class or consulting with an expert, spend some time learning investing fundamentals," Sabbia suggests.
HR tends to be useless so you should continue following up with the bankers and tell them directly that you know they have the decision-making power in terms of who gets interviews/offers, so you’d prefer to speak with them. Or say that you spoke with HR and that they referred you back to bankers. Either way, HR = useless so keep speaking with bankers and don’t take “no” for an answer.
MS. SMITH: So, you mentioned you went back to school. So, let's just back up a little bit more because I think most people would know you as a model, and on, you know, thousands of covers of magazines. Which is still happening today but in a different way for a different cause. But how did that—tell us about that journey and then how that informed sort of your decisions and your next steps.
Once I asked my dad a question who is an entrepreneur, “Do you think women are treated differently from men in work field?” He said, “No, as an owner of a company, we explore the full potential of every employee and make sure their talent is best used. Otherwise, why should we hire a person and why do we waste our money?” This dialogue between my dad and I partly illustrates the expectations of an employer — it’s not the gender that matters. It’s the capability that matters. Then, we talked about the status of women in China. We both believe that the status of female employee is increasing. But this doesn’t mean inequity has been put to a stop. Instead, more and more people come to speak out about their unfair experience. Even then, it is still a global problem that women are rejected due to stereotypes.
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