You will find that the majority of older women in the industry are more on the b**chy side. It may have a lot to do with the fact that when they started out, there were almost zero women, so they felt pressured to be a certain way, and they're personalities may have rubbed off on the women below them... etc. But just remember that you can do a GREAT job and still have fun on the job. It doesn't have to be miserable.
MS. SPELLINGS: Well, in Charlotte you can't say that too much because we have people like Andrea Smith who are leading the Chamber of Commerce, and of course a woman that is the mayor, and the superintendent here is a woman, and one of my board of governors' members I think is here, Anna Nelson, and on and on and on, Ophelia Garmon-Brown who has been so instrumental in the economic mobility work here. But that notwithstanding, there are gaps and, you know, when you, and when you're in a place like Washington there is such a public service mentality and so many opportunities for women, we'll get into some of that, but I am puzzled by that, particularly when most, I mean women are going to college and getting out of college at rates that far exceed, and we need to work on our men obviously, but that exceed women. So, what happens between the time that we're getting out of college, attaining at high levels, and being in those leadership roles? We get lost. Right? Which is why programs like this are so important.
My dad doesn’t even understand what I do. Within finance there are different departments and what I do is help companies raise money. Companies can raise money by issuing stock. I don’t do stock but I do bonds, which is kind of like a contract, like a mortgage. It’s a contract between the companies and the investors basically helping the company to borrow money from investors.
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I was in ECM, not currently pursuing it. If you want a personal life, do S&T/AM/PB. Life in ECM might be better than M&A but hours are still very long when you’re working on deals(and you want to be working on as many deals as you can if you are really interested in ECM). You also need to fly around and originate deals as you progress in your career. You can learn a lot in ECM too though the exit opp in M&A is probably broader given the solid modeling skills you gain. In ECM, you work on a lot of pitch books and presentations but might not necessarily learn how to value companies properly. Work life balance? I think its tough in ECM

JPMorgan, for instance, holds ‘Winning Women’ events which offer networking opportunities and guidance for prospective female investment bankers. Morgan Stanley has several diversity initiatives, including a leadership program for newly promoted female managing directors, a six-month leadership program for women vice presidents, as well as a women’s business exchange within the bank’s wealth management unit. On the more practical side, Goldman Sachs for example is accommodating mothers with on-site child care at its New York and New Jersey offices, as well as on-site lactation rooms.

Money Motivation: “Coming from a liberal arts background, I wanted real-world knowledge about finance. My parents aren’t in finance and I don’t have much of a background in finance. With econ as my major and learning theoretical things, it was worrisome to me. Am I going to be way behind everyone else? But [the guest speakers we have met during the program] told us that you learn everything on the job.”
Now, the down of it is because often those jobs don't pay as well as those in the private sector. So, I think women have been drawn into those roles, but the good of it is get yourself in there, manage, lead, learn, and translate those skills either upward in the, in the public sphere or externally in the private sector. And when I used to work on appointments for President Bush and when he was governor in Texas we used to try to sell people like Andrea that we were going to go from success to significance. And so-- MS. SMITH: And you did.

Olivia Ott talked about how her perception of the industry does not match the reality. Her expression has two points of view. First, she hates the desire to pursue only money or only to be rich. She thinks it is particularly annoying. I have seen a movie, the Wolf of Wall Street, the whole film pinpoints the importance of money. I’m not sure whether this is the belief of the whole financial market. I’m still in doubt if people who hold other values than money will have to change themselves to fit into the atmosphere. Secondly, Olivia thinks that her peers in Princeton have already made a step ahead of her, and she hasn’t started yet. So she felt the pressure. I feel the same way as she did in my school life, but her experience is inspiring. From her point of view, not every company was making money just for money, and not everyone was born in the finance industry. These two understandings are meaningful for many women who want to dig into this field but fear to do so. Although the finance world has been influenced by those very extreme and monetary supremacy, it is not the whole finance world. Rather, it still has some bright sides. For instance, people can make contributions, such as ESG’s 3 social good orientation investments through money.

Saul M. Simon, a certified financial planner with Simon Financial Group in Edison, N.J., recommends women investors start investing at work in their 401(k) or 403(b) retirement plans. Every dollar that goes into these plans reduces current income taxes. In addition, the money grows tax-deferred, and in many cases the employer matches a portion of your investment.
MS. SPELLINGS: Yeah, I think often, we dwell on kind of the half empty, "omen are not on tenure track, women are not on corporate boards" and all those sorts of things. And we need to pay attention to it. But I do think there are enormous assets to be in public service and to be a woman in public service. One, we all are motivated by, as Christy Turlington Burns was doing something for someone else. We all know friends who are like man I've been a lawyer all my life and I just, is that all there is? Well, if you're in working to close the achievement gap or improve maternal health you've got that mission, that fire in your belly to leave something behind that's bigger than yourself number one, and number two, and you and I have both enjoyed these experiences, when you're in public life and public service you'll be stunned at the kind of reach you can have as a woman, managing large amounts of money, managing large numbers of people, just an incredible opportunity for careers in public service and public life.
But rather than pitch men and women and their typical respective styles against each other, we might look to the success of diverse teams across the business world for a far more productive use of this information. A widely circulated study undertaken by McKinsey & Company found that companies in the top quartile for gender diversity on their executive teams were 21 percent more likely to experience above-average profitability. And in February this year, it was discovered that funds managed by mixed gender teams attracted 6 percent more inflows than those run solely by men or women over three years. Diversity, it’s clear, is good for business.
Not even close. We ran some projections based on the wage gap, typical asset allocation strategies, and a gender-specific salary curve. The true cost for the average woman at the time she retires may run two to seven times that amount. Depending on your salary and the market’s performance, the real cost of the investing gap over a 35-year career span could be more than $1 million. Yes, I said a million.

Sensing an opportunity and knowing that the industry had a need for greater diversity, Kevin Burke, managing director of NDIGI, invited Kathleen Dunlap, then CEO of GWI, to visit Notre Dame last summer and meet with Faculty Director Shane Corwin, finance professor Carl Ackermann and Roger Huang, then the Martin J. Gillen Dean of the Mendoza College of Business.
Do you need to hear that again? Nothing will make as big a difference in your retirement account balance as the amount you save. Even just adding an additional 1% can tip the scales significantly. A 35-year old earning $60,000 a year who puts an extra 1% (roughly $50 per month) into her retirement account will have an extra $3200 per year to live on in retirement (assuming a 7% rate of return and 1.5% raises.)
All of the top banks are run by men. A Catalyst study reports that women account for less than 17 percent of senior leaders in investment banking. In private equity, women comprise only 9 percent of senior executives and only 18 percent of total employees, according to a 2017 report by Preqin. At hedge funds and private debt firms, the numbers are similarly low — women hold just 11 percent of leadership roles.
MS. CALABRESE BAIN: So, I can talk about a few of the ways that Bank of America has made some progress on this front because I think that there's always more that we can do around education. So, you know, we have a partnership with the National Association of Women Business Owners in 60 cities across the U.S. where we partner Bank of America/Merrill Lynch women chapter leaders in these local cities to really bring thought leadership, to bring education, sometimes to bring financing. But it is our way of understanding what is it that makes women business owners tick? So that how can we be more supportive? So, you saw a couple of things earlier on the screen. We've got a partnership with the Tory Burch Foundation Capital Program, which we started in 2014. We've been able to finance over 1,100 women, small business owners, and commit $25 million worth of capital, and we hope to see that program grow. We also work with our Community Development Financial Institutions. It's always a mouthful, but for those who are not familiar they really provide technical assistance and affordable loans across the U.S., and Bank of America is the largest investor of CDFIs. So, we're really thrilled with our participation with 240 lenders across the United States. So, thank you for all of the support and the partnership. Lastly speaking about one more program, through Andrea's support in supplier diversity and development, again this is another program where we can work directly with women and diverse owned businesses, and in 2016 actually invested over $2.6 billion in procurement spending.

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The only reason I would say no is b/c finance is by far the major white-collar industry of NYC. In the manhattan neighborhood I lived in, I was intrigued whenever I met a person who didn't work in finance. I mean there's finance, real estate (which might also be considered finance) and law. However there's also random consulting companies and some large corporate HQ that are still in NYC. In the end though finance can be pretty broad pay-wise and workweek-wise.

Our New Year’s resolutions can vary across an endless array of categories—from finding love, making new friends, and moving to a new city to acquiring a new hobby or skill set. Among the most popular resolutions that people make involve job- and career-related goals. However, while making a New Year’s resolution for career change and success can be the beginning of a wonderful new chapter in our lives, it’s really just the first step.
The information provided herein is not directed at any investor or category of investors and is provided solely as general information about our products and services and to otherwise provide general investment education. No information contained herein should be regarded as a suggestion to engage in or refrain from any investment-related course of action as none of PIMCO nor any of its affiliates is undertaking to provide investment advice, act as an adviser to any plan or entity subject to the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974, as amended, individual retirement account or individual retirement annuity, or give advice in a fiduciary capacity with respect to the materials presented herein. If you are an individual retirement investor, contact your financial advisor or other fiduciary unrelated to PIMCO about whether any given investment idea, strategy, product or service described herein may be appropriate for your circumstances.
Here’s the bottom line—many folks who are unhappy with their work lives or who are just eager for a fresh start or new challenge take the new year as an opportunity to make a change, and it’s a great time to do so! Because so many people are focused on career changes at the beginning of a new year, many companies and industries ramp up their hiring during this time—and those among us who are serious and dedicated can take full advantage of this reality. If this sounds like you, perhaps now is a great time to move forward—but do so wisely and plan accordingly. Good luck and Happy New Year!

Move over millennials, here comes the IGen! Born between 1995 and 2005 this group of tech savvy natives is the next cohort and are just now entering the workforce. IGen, or Gen Z as they are often referred, have grown up in a world of social media where Youtube, Instagram, and Twitter reign supreme. These kids are a force to be reckoned with and require access to information in ways that are familiar, immediate, and actionable. Our success depends on them because as the IGen goes, so goes the manufacturing industry, the nation, and the world.


As president of the Atlanta Fed, Bostic leads one of the 12 regional Reserve Banks that, with the Board of Governors, make up the Federal Reserve System, the nation’s central bank. The Atlanta Fed is responsible for the Sixth Federal Reserve District, which encompasses Alabama, Florida, and Georgia and portions of Louisiana, Mississippi, and Tennessee. As its key functions, the Atlanta Fed participates in setting national monetary policy, supervises numerous banking organizations, and provides a variety of payment services to financial institutions and the U.S. government. Bostic has overall responsibility for these functions and represents the Sixth Federal Reserve District at meetings of the Federal Open Market Committee, the policymaking body within the Federal Reserve that sets monetary policy for the nation.
Sensing an opportunity and knowing that the industry had a need for greater diversity, Kevin Burke, managing director of NDIGI, invited Kathleen Dunlap, then CEO of GWI, to visit Notre Dame last summer and meet with Faculty Director Shane Corwin, finance professor Carl Ackermann and Roger Huang, then the Martin J. Gillen Dean of the Mendoza College of Business.
So how do women break the investment barrier in ways that can lead to lifelong financial independence? Sabbia has three key suggestions: learn the basics, define your goals, and invest in yourself. For more advanced investors, Sabbia suggests being a mentor that can help break the silence around talking about money. Doing so could accelerate the close of that wealth gap for all women. Let's examine each recommendation in closer detail.
MS. TURLINGTON BURNS: Well, I guess, I mean, mainly we started after the film came out. We were a resource. You know, who's doing what where was the way we sort of saw ourselves. And through that, I got to meet a lot of different organizations working in maternal health. Also, as a student of Public Health, you know, the world is fairly small in the maternal child health space. So, I started to get to meet a lot of incredible people who have been working their entire careers, Melanne being one of those people. And so, you know, having access to women who were leaders in these areas was incredibly inspiring. And then in terms of finding partners, I mean we started as a campaign, and then I learned that that wasn't completely fulfilling. I felt like I wanted to do more and I wanted to really connect people who were being moved by learning this information and wanting to do something that it was really hard for them to do that. So, I felt like ultimately starting an organization that I could have more control. Being able to put those pieces together and connect those dots was a lot more gratifying, not only for the community we were trying to bring along but also for the NGOs on the ground. And what I've found over time is that smaller, grassroots, community-led groups are the most exciting to work with because they truly do partner with you. And we have, as an organization, funded some larger initiatives, and you know, it's hard to get the phone picked up, and it's hard to—you know, there's a lot of turnover in the people who run the program, and you just want to, you want to have that human touch, and so, it's something that I really strive for with Every Mother Counts to continue to have that human touch. It's the most human of all issues that I can think of, and for people who have an experience or suffer a loss, or lose a loved one, or the healthcare providers that are trying to, you know, provide services every day, I think it's really important that all of those people feel, you know, respected, and have a voice, and that we can be there for them.  

I am often amazed by how many intelligent, well-educated women have little knowledge and/or interest in investing and retirement planning. As a gender, we have to do something about this. Oh, that’s interesting, is a common response when women ask my friend, a female financial advisor, what she does for a living. And it is often delivered in a tone of voice that conveys just how interesting it is to have one’s teeth extracted or to find a piece of roadkill on one’s doorstep. The subtle cringe that shadows many women’s brows when a financial advisor mentions retirement planning or investment management has become a familiar sight.
“It is important to broaden the students’ awareness of the various career paths to help them understand the magnitude of opportunities beyond investment banking,” Scott said. “Ultimately, we hope that all our students build on the skills they learn in the classroom and in their first destination jobs to find their area of interest. We regularly talk to the students about their careers being a marathon, with many pivots, twists and turns. It is not a sprint.”
Through its website, TFS connects students to more than 7 million scholarships representing more than $41 billion in aid. Continual increases in tuition fees and other college expenses are critical issues impacting students and families across the United States – particularly those who can’t afford to finance higher education on their own. According to the College Board’s 2016 Trends in College Planning, the average published tuition and fee price in the private nonprofit four-year sector is about 2.3 times higher than it was in 1986-87, after adjusting for inflation. It is 3.1 times higher in the public four-year sector and 2.4 times higher in the public two-year sector. As a result of these trends, an increasing number of students must rely on scholarships to attend college or graduate school.
From a male perspective, very interesting to read. Never thought about these issues women face in networking, and I’ve never had any such problem (that I know of!) in networking I’ve done with women or they with me. Still though, good to keep in mind when networking with women to prevent any misinterpretations or problems. Thanks for this article; this subject should be talked about a lot more.

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Similar to Raise, Cardpool works as a platform for users to buy and sell gift cards. Buyers can get up to 92 percent of a gift card’s value. Sellers may have to wait a bit longer for their money because, unlike Raise, Cardpool doesn’t post the funds directly to the seller’s bank account. Instead, the payment comes in the form of an Amazon eGift Card or a bank check sent via snail mail.
Moreover, the evidence suggests that your team will be stronger if it consists of both men and women. A 2011 Harvard Business Review study discovered that single-gender teams were less effective at problem solving than mixed groups. The Barber-Odean study found that married men performed better than single men in the stock market and concluded that this was likely due to a spouse’s influence. “When you ask if men or women are the better investors, you’re asking the wrong question,” says Suzanne Duncan, global head of research at the State Street Center for Applied Research, a think tank sponsored by the big financial-services firm. “We are better together. Men and women should have an equal voice in the investment process.”

My dad doesn’t even understand what I do. Within finance there are different departments and what I do is help companies raise money. Companies can raise money by issuing stock. I don’t do stock but I do bonds, which is kind of like a contract, like a mortgage. It’s a contract between the companies and the investors basically helping the company to borrow money from investors.
For those who doubt that women can be successful investment bankers, there are a few examples such as Marisa Drew, a co-head of Global Markets at Credit Suisse, who has worked in investment banking for over twenty-five years, starting her career as an analyst back in 1986. Another good example is Mary Callahan Erdoes, who has been serving as the chief executive of JPMorgan Asset Management since 2009 where she oversees more than $2 trillion. Ruth Porat also deserves a mention, having worked as chief financial officer and executive vice president of Morgan Stanley between 2010 and 2015, when she decided to leave the bank for Google where she became the tech giant’s first female CFO.
Shelly Bell has lived many lives. She’s a computer scientist, a former high school teacher, a performance poet, a community organizer, a founder, and a CEO. She has two successful apparel printing businesses: MsPrint USA—through which she creates swag for clients like Amazon and Google with a team of women designers and printers—and Made By A Black Woman, which celebrates products made by Black women.

Investing money in the stock market is not a complicated process, but it requires making decisions. Will you buy funds, exchange traded funds or equities? If so, which ones — and in what proportion? And on which platform will you choose to hold your investments? These are the practical barriers, but bigger decisions are needed to guide these choices — namely, what am I saving for, and how can I do so in the most tax-efficient way?

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excellent post, thanks. even if this topic has been addressed and discussed however many times prior to my getting here asking the questions, i still ask it one more time ;) simply because it is important to get a personal feel to things, and not take things for granted third hand. imo, it increases the chance of making a better decision. things change, you know, day by day. i will kick the tires 100 times with my own shoes if that is what it takes for me to get a good feel when some others feel perfectly comfortable taking just a glance. to each his or her own.
Anyone who wishes to invest in firms that benefit women who are not employees will quickly find that there is as yet no systematic way to measure broader “gender impact”. Even inside firms, data are lacking. “We need to move beyond just counting women and start taking into account culture,” says Barbara Krumsiek of Arabesque, an asset manager that uses data on “ESG”: environmental, social and governance issues. It is urging firms to provide more gender-related data, such as on attrition rates and pay gaps. Just as its “S-Ray” algorithm meant it dropped Volkswagen because the carmaker scored poorly on corporate governance well before its value was hit by the revelation that it was cheating on emissions tests, in future it hopes information about problems such as sexual harassment could help it spot firms with a “toxic” management culture before a scandal hits the share price.
Nearly two-thirds of women polled say females are less likely than males to reach leadership roles. Only 56 percent of men and 37 percent of women agree that males and females are equally likely to become leaders in their industry. What's holding women back? Almost no one says the biggest obstacle is women opting out of leadership positions. Rather, it comes down to how quickly employees are promoted. Fewer than half of women (47 percent) felt that “men and women are promoted at an equal rate at their companies," and 26 percent of men also identified this gap.
I don't know. Average starting salary for a T10 MBA in a variety of fields is very high. I doubt non finance Wharton graduates are making 65K a year or something like that. Suppose this woman has 5 years of serious brand management or marketing experience behind her at a huge company. She gets an MBA in finance from Columbia or something and goes into a non banking role. I would assume her salary would be 80-90ish with a bonus.
The unique BGV Pitch Competition, of which there are 10 per year, is described on the website as “a crowdfunding meets pitch competition.” Attendees pay admission at the door, selected founders pitch for three minutes, and the audience votes. Winners receive the money raised from admission fees, in addition to other perks like a free consultation with both a lawyer and an accountant and a meeting with an investor.
The first thing I want to make clear is that women really are missing out right now. Investing is a huge wealth generator, and women, for one reason or another, tend to do it less. Seventy-one percent of the money women have is in cash, and any financial advisor will tell you, cash not only doesn’t earn a return; it actually depreciates over time thanks to inflation. The stock market, on the other hand, has returned an average of 9.5 percent for the past ninety years, even including the horrific downturn in 2007. The good news is a lot of companies are trying to figure out how to change that. Partly because it’s the right thing to do, partly because it’s good business.
Krawcheck, long known as the most powerful woman on Wall Street, was CEO of wealth management firm Merrill Lynch during its acquisition by Bank of America; she left in 2011. Ellevest is backed by $10 million in funding from some of the biggest names in the investment business, including Chicago-based research firm Morningstar and Mohamed El-Erian, chief economic adviser at Allianz.
The men in the survey expressed a greater willingness to bet on exotic investments such as bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies to boost returns in their retirement savings accounts, such as 401(k)s and IRAs. Their cash was more likely to be funneled into investments with greater return potential, such as stocks, mutual funds and exchange traded funds (ETFs).
A bigger presence of women in the area of business management if essential. I personaly don’t know if it’s correct to assume that woman have a different way of thinking when compared with man in waht concerns this area, but to be too restricted to any specific “kind” of people (specific gender, ethnicity, whatever) is archaic and not beneficial at all to any sector. So there is a considerable importance in correcting this concentration of men.

As  banks' claims to diversity are blown apart by the figures emerging from the UK's gender pay gap reporting requirements, how does it feel to be a woman in finance? Do you buy the Goldman story that men and women are paid equally for equal work and it's just a question of getting more women into senior slots, or do you get angry and point to more insidious issues?
While it is naïve to think that complete gender equality on Wall Street would happen overnight, the bottom line is that women, who have largely stood at the sidelines of investment banking, have potential for being successful in the field and investment banks are increasingly looking to tap that potential. Or to quote the great Bob Dylan, the times, they are a-changin’. 

OP, I'm not saying this to be rude, but arguably the most important trait of a successful analyst is being resourceful. This question has been asked hundreds of times on WSO and always is answered the same way: if you work hard, no one cares if you're male, female, black, white, or a martian. Again, not trying to be rude, but this has been asked and answered ad-nauseum.

“TFS Scholarships was inspired by my own father’s experience as an inner-city high school principal, and grew out of the realization that more could be done to support students searching for college scholarships,” said Richard Sorensen, president of TFS Scholarships. “For more than 30 years, TFS has helped students achieve their higher education aspirations by making it easier to find essential funding for college.”
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