So, we decided that we needed something else to really complement what we were doing from generating this stream of income to then educate them in how to improve their living conditions. Especially my hope is that I can change—and I think we are changing—the lives of the next generation that is their children. So, with the foundation we're working, bringing students from universities in the U.S. and Europe to work with these families on literacy, on preventive health. We run a mentorship program as well—that's my way of paying back what I'm receiving here this week—where we motivate these teenagers to study an undergrad degree, to understand importance of education, to lift them out of poverty and generate opportunities not only for themselves but for their communities.
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Be judicious about reporting it. If it happens during an on-campus interview, talk to your college career office. They’ll determine how to address it with the company and can anonymize their report. It’s harder to report harassment if it happens at an informal event and you’re not an employee of the firm. As much as I hate to let guys get away with this behavior, you may have to let it go for the time being if that’s the case. Calling the firm to report him runs the risk of branding you as a potential liability – but you can tell other women in your network about it so they know to watch out.
To be successful, business development VP Marissa Meiter says, “You can’t be afraid to put yourself out there, the worst thing someone can do is tell you the timing isn’t right.” Meiter taps into her experience working at a family-owned bank equipment business and appreciates the company’s focus on relationship building. She enjoys hearing the business owner’s stories and educating them on their M&A options.

I write contracts that are a little bit more involved in terms of tax and accounting stuff but also it’s a contract that helps the company raise money with certain objectives. So if you borrow money from the bank for a mortgage your credit rating goes down, same with the company’s. I do something with bonds that make them have ‘equity like; features, it’s called a hybrid. Basically what I do is create very funky bonds. [Laughs] That’s what I say in my Instagram profile because no one understands. It’s bonds, but it’s very funky.
There’s also a concept I think you should be familiar with. It’s called passive investing. The idea is that it’s smarter to invest across the entire market and then not pay attention to it, than it is to pick stocks or pay someone else to pick stocks. It’s easier and less expensive, and historically it’s been more successful. In fact, Warren Buffett made a $1 million wager that passive investing would beat hedge funds—and he was right. It’s why he advises his heirs to invest passively with their money.
The reluctance to invest outside of company plans may be related to women’s lack of confidence in their investing abilities, which can make them prone to procrastination. “Women hold back because they think they need to know everything before they invest,” says Alexandra Lebenthal, chief executive of Lebenthal & Co., a New York City money-management company. Krawcheck agrees, saying that wanting to know more before getting started can be a trap. “There’s always a desire to know more. But if you wait, it just gets harder,” she says.
Stocks. They represent a part ownership in a company or corporation, also known as business equity. Basically, when a company performs well, the stock tends to increase in value. Stocks tend to be more volatile investments, meaning they can give you a high return on your investment long-term but tend to have larger swings in value in the short-term.

There are some interestings measures that were taken by some scientific competitions in Brazil, in order to attract more girls. A nice one that I saw is what the Brazilian Physics Olympiad proposed to do: give graphene rings to the medalist girls. It’s a good incentive, without any facilitation. But sometimes I think that they do it wrongly, by helping to much the girls, like if they were saying “come and participate, it will be easier for you!” and well, I don’t like it. Girls are as capable as boys, they do not need to be assisted, they do not need to have facilitations. Doing this is not correcting the problems, but instead it’s similar to “sweep it to under the rug”. The competitions are supposed to select the best ones and so they must incentivize the women until all of them that they can be the best and stand on the top, and not blind them telling that they reached the top when they did not yet.
#1... biggest advice to any female looking to break into finance... drop the feminista thing, it won't get you anywhere. It's ok to be bitchy, and in fact may help you in certain instances, but don't ever, ever pull the feminist card. There's nothing worse than a person who chalks up their own personal failings to an "anti-me" thing. It's nothing more than an excuse for being a slacker.
Ellevest’s “What The Elle” Newsletter. The Ellevest site as a whole is my favorite resource for women-specific investment research and advice. They have content about the gender pay gap, how to invest responsibly, how to negotiate for a raise, and every financial topic in between. Their co-founder and CEO Sallie Krawcheck has a monthly newsletter called “What The Elle” that gives insights into everyday investing and financial advice for women.
Younger men are far more likely to invest according to their values than their fathers were; 81% of millennial men in Morgan Stanley’s survey were interested in sustainable investing. And though fewer American men than women say they want to invest in companies with diverse leadership, the share is still sizeable, at 42%. If gender-lens investing is truly to take off, it will have to appeal to those who control the bulk of wealth—and that is still men.

Fidelity research among professional women across the country shows there's no shortage of interest in learning more about financial management and investment choices, with over 90 percent saying they want to learn more about financial planning8. For many, this stems from a need to play ‘catch up,' with a majority reporting a lack of opportunity to learn financial skills earlier in life.
Once I asked my dad a question who is an entrepreneur, “Do you think women are treated differently from men in work field?” He said, “No, as an owner of a company, we explore the full potential of every employee and make sure their talent is best used. Otherwise, why should we hire a person and why do we waste our money?” This dialogue between my dad and I partly illustrates the expectations of an employer — it’s not the gender that matters. It’s the capability that matters. Then, we talked about the status of women in China. We both believe that the status of female employee is increasing. But this doesn’t mean inequity has been put to a stop. Instead, more and more people come to speak out about their unfair experience. Even then, it is still a global problem that women are rejected due to stereotypes.
Thanks for your reply Nicole. I know you are currently pursuing ECM if I’m not mistaken. What are the pros/cons of ECM vs. M&A? In terms of exit opps and learning curve, M&A is definitely the best route, but in terms of personal life, ECM…Only disadvantage to ECM, I take it, is the less technical/more narrow content…Your input would be appreciated!
To kick off FUND Conference in Chicago this Fall, it is our honor to host the second Women Investing in Women (WiW) event. This exclusive event will feature keynotes, fireside discussions, and panels that focus on advancing women-led companies and bridging the unacceptable gender gap in business. A working lunch will match attendees with the resources they need to grow their business. This is an opportunity to create powerful relationships and networks to generate deal-flow for women-owned companies and the investors, service providers and communities who support them.

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I am recruiting, but I have a problem. We have reviewed over 40 CVs for a senior analyst position, and only 2 have been from women. I asked my head of HR to talk to the recruiter and make it clear that we wanted/expected to see more female applicants, but what he said shocked us. He said that at entry level in investment banking, 1 in 4 positions are filled by women. But by the time they get to associate level (year 4), the numbers have plummeted to just 1 in 18.
Stocks. They represent a part ownership in a company or corporation, also known as business equity. Basically, when a company performs well, the stock tends to increase in value. Stocks tend to be more volatile investments, meaning they can give you a high return on your investment long-term but tend to have larger swings in value in the short-term.
I am often amazed by how many intelligent, well-educated women have little knowledge and/or interest in investing and retirement planning. As a gender, we have to do something about this. Oh, that’s interesting, is a common response when women ask my friend, a female financial advisor, what she does for a living. And it is often delivered in a tone of voice that conveys just how interesting it is to have one’s teeth extracted or to find a piece of roadkill on one’s doorstep. The subtle cringe that shadows many women’s brows when a financial advisor mentions retirement planning or investment management has become a familiar sight.
Do you need to hear that again? Nothing will make as big a difference in your retirement account balance as the amount you save. Even just adding an additional 1% can tip the scales significantly. A 35-year old earning $60,000 a year who puts an extra 1% (roughly $50 per month) into her retirement account will have an extra $3200 per year to live on in retirement (assuming a 7% rate of return and 1.5% raises.)
Once I asked my dad a question who is an entrepreneur, “Do you think women are treated differently from men in work field?” He said, “No, as an owner of a company, we explore the full potential of every employee and make sure their talent is best used. Otherwise, why should we hire a person and why do we waste our money?” This dialogue between my dad and I partly illustrates the expectations of an employer — it’s not the gender that matters. It’s the capability that matters. Then, we talked about the status of women in China. We both believe that the status of female employee is increasing. But this doesn’t mean inequity has been put to a stop. Instead, more and more people come to speak out about their unfair experience. Even then, it is still a global problem that women are rejected due to stereotypes.
MS. TURLINGTON BURNS: Well, the causes of death are the same. Post-partum hemorrhage is the leading cause, but—and you have sepsis, and different infections that might arise. You have hypertensive disorders, which you might see here in a different way than in other countries. We have a rising sort of chronic disease problem here in the United States, and so obesity, diabetes, those are our conditions that certainly impact the health and wellbeing of mom and her birth, and the child's birth as well. I think you would think that in our country where we spend more on healthcare than any other industrialized country per capita that we would have not the same lack of care, that access wouldn't be the problem and yet—
No. In your early 20s, you’re just happy to have a job. I loved the markets and the trading floor atmosphere. As you get more senior, the pay disparity, the accounts being unequally distributed becomes more apparent. It bothered me. The little frat boy jokes stuff was a constant drumbeat. It didn’t get to me that much. As I got into my 30s, I was bothered more by seeing young women come who were talented and leave because of the environment.
MS. KATZIFF: Well thank you, we do appreciate the feedback and agree that there's a lot of talented women in our organization. But we have had women's programs, women's development programs for years, decades now. One of the things that we did realize though is there was so many around the globe, in the United States and around the globe that last year we realized that there would be some significant power in pulling that all together. So, we have made significant progress but if we came up with a common core mission. And so we formed an umbrella organization, the Investing in Women's Council, at the beginning of 2016 and I am very lucky to be the Executive Sponsor and Leader of that. And we came up with four additional kind of core common goals for us. One is attracting, hiring, retaining women. One is in addition to broad women we realized we really needed to focus on ethnic diversity as it relates to female leadership, and pulling up ethnic diversity in women to higher levels in our organization. Also, just development programs in general. We had tons of them, probably almost too many, and how to depict the few that were extraordinarily impactful, and then track women along the way after they went through the programs. And the last thing we called out as a focus, Margaret mentioned, which was the advocacy, and how do you bring men and women into the fold to being very strong advocates every single day, and how do you bring that to work? So, those are just some new things we have been doing in the last year, year and a half to push it forward.
Hi Diana! Well, it’s sad to know that so few girls come to participate of this incredible event. And a, even more sad thing is to notice that, actually, this few is a surprisingly “high” percentage… When you look upon girls percentage in STEAM, or at least in Scientific Olympiads, in my country, and I believe that in most countries too, it’s much smaller than 27%. There are those who say that it’s due to some kind of tendency of boys having more facility in this areas when compared to girls. Well, personally, I don’t believe in such a thing, principally because different kinds of intelligence (and ways of thinking and perceiving things) can be used to achieve success, even more if we’re talking about finances, an area that is very versatile. Other argument for this problem that I once heard was that girls have less time to study e put efforts in those things due the obligation that many of them have of taking care of the house. Again, I don’t think that this is the cause, at least not the big one. Of course it’s a problem, any kid should have the studies damaged due to any kind of work, even in home. But see, there are many girls who are top students in their class, this “lack of time” due to work now a days is not so comum, and some boys also have it because they need to help their fathers if some tasks on even in the job itself (I some times did it; two days ago I helped my father covering some merchandise to protect it from the rain). The real villain, I think, are the scar left by a past much more patriarchal than the actual society. A past in which girls were really considered as inferiors and suffered a hard discrimination. Unfortunately, there are people who keeps this archaic thinking, but it’s not the general society. And those scars made the representation os women in these areas be much smaller and now many girls look upon it and feel like if that did not fit them, and also it basically give birth to the wrong separation of “boy things” and “girl things”. Now, THIS is the real problem.
You will find that the majority of older women in the industry are more on the b**chy side. It may have a lot to do with the fact that when they started out, there were almost zero women, so they felt pressured to be a certain way, and they're personalities may have rubbed off on the women below them... etc. But just remember that you can do a GREAT job and still have fun on the job. It doesn't have to be miserable.
MS. URZAIZ: For sure. I think trying to set up the business that I have before e-commerce was a thing—I don't even know how I would have, you know, reached as many places that I reach. We ship to every continent in the world, to places as remote as Ulaanbaatar in Mongolia, that you wouldn't think we can reach. But everything—it's online. They reach me online and we're excited to say that my hammocks are used everywhere in the world.
Positive intent can be a powerful motivating force for change and growth in our lives, but the truth is that it’s often not enough—this is the reason why the majority of us fail to completely commit and follow through on the resolutions we make each year. The truth is, most resolutions flounder in the starting gate without any real forward progress ever being made, and many others are met with a feeble, half-hearted effort that eventually goes nowhere. We need more than a positive attitude and hope—we need a plan.
Many companies in the financial sector are also guilty of perpetuating a male focus, Mr Tsivrikos adds. “The language and visual aspects of investing are still very male-dominated – even things such as bank notes, which have more images of men on them. The more we have female figures on money and as visual components in the world of finance, the more they will be engaged.

It can be a very hard line to walk, and you're constantly searching for balance in literally every aspect of your personality (be fun, but don't be TOO fun; don't get easily offended, but don't internalize the shit that really does upset you; be assertive and don't let people talk over you or dismiss your ideas, but don't come off as bitch so make sure you modify everything you say by making it seem like a question or a suggestion, etc etc etc). It's not so bad at the junior levels, but I think you can definitely see and feel it more as you get older.
As a female Baby Boomer, I'll admit that this realization was a little scary. We all see the statistics on the number of Baby Boomers retiring every day – shouldn't I be ready to join that movement any day now? But I quickly discovered I was not alone in my fears. Talking with my close friends, I was amazed to find that many of us were in the same boat. Of course, when you consider the many unique challenges women face in retirement planning, it's not surprising that my female friends shared my same fears and difficulties.
Most families have one person that is in charge of the family’s finances, we want to change that. Together you have worked hard to raise a family, own a home and build a life, making all the big decisions together, though life’s joys and challenges, securing a financial future is a partnership too. Talking about money can be difficult for a variety of reasons mostly because men and women approach money differently. Women have sharp intuition when it comes to money; and by 2020, they are expected to control $22 trillion in assets. Ninety-five percent of women will be their family's primary financial decision maker at some point in their lives. When it comes to investing we want to encourage couples to get involved in the money conversation before a life changing event occurs.
First up, a woman in one of the most male-dominated industries of them all: investment banking. Sure, we've heard the horror stories of 100+ hour workweeks, fraternity-esque hazing of entry-level employees, and of course, rampant sexual harassment. But it's probably not all The Wolf of Wall Street. To get the record straight, we're talking to an entry-level investment banking analyst. 
The lesson, says Ramona Persaud, manager of Fidelity Global Equity Income Fund (FGILX), is that it’s important to manage risk and avoid huge losses. If you invest in individual stocks, says Persaud, look for strong companies that are willing and able to pay generous dividends. “Your investment return is a combination of dividends and price appreciation,” she says. “If you have enough dividend yield, it dampens the downside.”
“The GWI program is one of the programs that the institute is implementing to make more female students aware of the careers in investment management,” Mary Scott, associate director of the Notre Dame Institute for Global Investing (NDIGI), said of the program. “As we broaden awareness of how intellectually stimulating and rewarding these types of careers can be, our hope is that more females will be interested in pursuing this industry.”
So why don't the women stick around? I don't have any research to back up my theories, but I think it's this: investment banks in general are not very nice places for women to work. It's a culture problem; male dominated, aggressive and not much fun. In my opinion, until the (largely male) leadership teams start to actively address their culture, the women will continue to leave in droves.
You should have a six-month emergency fund. Investing is a great way to grow money but the key to making it grow is time. Why? Because investing is a risky venture. When you put money in the market, you are saying, “I don’t need this money for a few years.” First of all, you could invest and see that money decrease immediately. But the short-term fluctuations aren’t important. What is important is that over the long term the money will likely grow. So, while that money is tied up, you’ll need an emergency fund to tide you over during any rough spells—unemployment, bad health, etc. (We’ve got more reasons here.) And besides, when you sell your investments, you have to pay taxes on that—making a savings account a much more attractive place to store some extra cash. (Follow our checklist to build up your savings.)
Be judicious about reporting it. If it happens during an on-campus interview, talk to your college career office. They’ll determine how to address it with the company and can anonymize their report. It’s harder to report harassment if it happens at an informal event and you’re not an employee of the firm. As much as I hate to let guys get away with this behavior, you may have to let it go for the time being if that’s the case. Calling the firm to report him runs the risk of branding you as a potential liability – but you can tell other women in your network about it so they know to watch out.
Top priorities of retirees also seem to differ from those of non-retirees. The retirees’ top priorities include maintaining their standard of living (29 percent), followed by spending time with loved ones (27 percent) and maintaining their health (23 percent). Despite that nearly one in five non-retirees hope to make traveling the world their top retirement priority, only 5 percent of retirees have prioritized traveling.
One of my favorite African proverbs says that if you want to go fast go it alone, but if you want to go far go together. And that's certainly what we're going to be talking about on this panel today. I'm thrilled to be joined by first Oulimata Sarr. She is a Regional Advisor for economic empowerment of women with UN Women. UN Women is the UN agency responsible for women's, responsible for women's empowerment, economic, political, and otherwise. Next to her is Katerina Cronstedt. She is a serial entrepreneur from Russia. She in my opinion, reading her bio, has led many lives, fit so much in, and she is currently the founder of Bankatering, and we'll hear a little bit more about that in a minute. And finally, you've already met Christine Katziff from Bank of America. She is the Global General Auditor. It's great that you have time to join us, that sounds like a really big job.  

At Ellevest, we’ve found (and research confirms) that women are not so much risk-averse but risk-aware—meaning that they want to thoroughly understand a risk before they take it on. And once they do? A study from the University of California at Berkeley describes women as “rational” investors, meaning that they take on smart risks, and the women in the study outperformed the men, whose overtrading due to overconfidence was a less successful move in the long run.

As an alternative, open a savings account with a high annual percentage yield (APY), which means you’ll earn interest based on how much you deposit into your savings account. According to Bankrate.com, a good APY is between 3 and 5 percent. Make sure when that your direct deposit hits, you’re automating your payments into your savings account that way you won’t forget. However, make sure it is not easily accessible to make withdrawals from your savings. If you feel you don’t have the self-control to not withdraw from your savings, here’s a few reasons why you should keep your checking and savings account at different banks, according to LearnVest.


My dad doesn’t even understand what I do. Within finance there are different departments and what I do is help companies raise money. Companies can raise money by issuing stock. I don’t do stock but I do bonds, which is kind of like a contract, like a mortgage. It’s a contract between the companies and the investors basically helping the company to borrow money from investors.
By Mansi Gupta, Design Specialist, Women’s World Banking  “If a hospital isn’t involved, I’m healthy enough.” Women’s World Banking spoke with women in India to better understand their views on health, health emergencies and the role of insurance. By understanding their attitudes on health issues, Women’s World Banking will work to increase uptake and usage […]
Phil Town is an investment advisor, hedge fund manager, 3x NY Times best-selling author, ex-Grand Canyon river guide and a former Lieutenant in the US Army Special Forces. He and his wife, Melissa, share a passion for horses, polo, and eventing. Phil’s goal is to help you learn how to invest and achieve financial independence. You can follow him on google+, facebook, and twitter.
Imagine how much easier it would be to manage your finances if change were not an ever-present dynamic. Of course, change is a fact of life – and life would be pretty boring without it! But change can certainly make long-term financial management difficult. Without insight into the future and what might transpire, planning presents plenty of challenges.
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